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You've got time on your side, so you could also just refrigerate the drippings and lift off the cake of congealed fat before dinner. Given my druthers, that's always my Plan A.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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On 7/12/2018 at 2:29 PM, Anna N said:

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So this photograph will prove beyond a shadow of a doubt just how much influence I have over Kerry Beal. None. 

 

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 Some herbs that we should have no trouble killing.

 

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And a fun puzzle. What is in the box from Amazon? Here’s a hint — it’s not food related. 

 

 

 

 

 

A little late to be asking but I'm just getting caught up.  What are those onion petals?  I don't think I've ever seen them.

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On 7/16/2018 at 8:46 AM, Anna N said:

Good morning. It’s a sticky and somewhat cloudy morning here in Little Current. The temperature is 21°C with an expected high of 26°.  

 

Kerry is on call for the next 24 hours. 

 

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I started my day with two cups of coffee and one of these incredible mangoes that Kerry bought from Costco. 

 

 

Those look amazing.  Were there 8 mangos in the box?  (Going to costco tomorrow.)  Do you store them in the fridge?  

Edited by ElsieD
Fixed a typo (log)
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58 minutes ago, chromedome said:

You've got time on your side, so you could also just refrigerate the drippings and lift off the cake of congealed fat before dinner. Given my druthers, that's always my Plan A.

 Mine too. I chilled it off in the sink and stuck it in the fridge and it looks like it’s going to make it before dinner time to be able to just lift off the fat.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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29 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

A little late to be asking but I'm just getting caught up.  What are those onion petals?  I don't think I've ever seen them.

Ha ha! Forgot all about them. Had you not brought them up they might’ve gone stale in the cupboard. No idea what they are they caught my eye and they ended up in our shopping basket!  I shall remove them from the cupboard put them where we might actually see them. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The recipe.

 

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The mise.  No thyme  as it is not Kerry‘s favourite herb. I did zest the lemon in case we can’t live without gremolata. 

 

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 Pretty much ready for a final finishing with some lemon juice. Decided to use the Dutch oven which has a lid rather than the sauté pan which doesn’t. Wasn’t prepared to build dams today!  

 

The only thing left to worry about is the sauce/gravy for the beef.  And sauces are not necessarily my forte.  

 

This is the devilish route my mind is going. Heat up a small sauté pan and add a little butter. Into the butter scrape the solids that I have precipitated from the osmazome and produce some fond.   Deglaze with the liquid from the osmazone and some of the braising liquid once I have reduced it. Thicken with a beurre manié. 

 

 I will stand back while those of you who know better throw things at me!  It’s all good. We learn more by our mistakes than with our successes. 

 

The only trouble is up here you can’t just pick up the phone and order in pizza or Chinese when everything falls apart. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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14 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Those look amazing.  Were there 8 mangos in the box?  (Going to costco to borrow.)  Do you store them in the fridge?  

 They are amazing. So amazing that when Kerry had finished prepping one for Kira and was about to drop the pit into the garbage can, I took it from her, leaned over the sink and scraped itvclean with my very few teeth. :D

 

Not sure if there were eight or nine in the box but they appear to be packed by weight and this was 1.75 kg.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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2A45251E-B27B-4CF4-8EFB-AB179751EBC3.thumb.jpeg.407d7dbf9bf78482e9ff40c521f31d35.jpeg

 

Impromptu dessert idea.  Mango topped with ginger snap crumbs. I liked the flavour but the crumbs were a bit too fine and quickly softened. Needs more work. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 minute ago, Anna N said:

2A45251E-B27B-4CF4-8EFB-AB179751EBC3.thumb.jpeg.407d7dbf9bf78482e9ff40c521f31d35.jpeg

 

Impromptu dessert idea.  Mango topped with ginger snap crumbs. I liked the flavour but the crumbs were a bit too fine and quickly softened. Needs more work. 

Maybe make what amounts to a crust - a little melted butter added and pressed into a dish and baked until solid.  Then crumbled.  Might hold up better.

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Good morning. I am looking out over the marina at another gorgeous Manitoulin day. It was 17°C last time I looked. I was chatting with my son this morning and he was telling me it was only 13°C in Oakville. That’s cool for July but who’s complaining!

 

 Kerry is working in town today in the clinic. She has a lovely PA (Physician’s Assistant)  so she should have a civilized time of it. 

 

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My breakfast: mushrooms, tomato, scallions and scrambled egg. 

 

Not committing to very much today. May just bury my head in a Kindle book after taking care of a few chores.

 

It did occur to me that had I cored the cabbage  and thrown it into the freezer when it first came home it would now be waiting for me instead of the other way around!  

 

 

 

 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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In an effort to make some useful contribution to our existence today, in spite of my lassitude, I have thrown a strip loin and two lamb chops into the sous vide bath.   It may not amount to anything like a true mixed grill, but it will at least keep us from the ravages of hunger at dinner time. Peas and some mint sauce might be all it takes to turn it into something reasonable. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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 Kerry brought her lovely PA home for lunch. No she wasn’t going to be lunch,  she was going to eat lunch. Fortunately she had packed a lunch for herself not knowing she would be invited. This worked out very well and gave us a lovely chance to chat. 

 

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My lunch was a well-buttered cream scone and coffee. 

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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22 hours ago, ElsieD said:

A little late to be asking but I'm just getting caught up.  What are those onion petals?  I don't think I've ever seen them.

 So we finally did get around to trying the onion petals. I would describe them as onion-flavoured, beige Cheezies or as simply another salt delivery system. But because they are all salty and seemingly nothing more than air, I suspect one could soon become addicted to them.  I shall try to avoid falling into that trap.   Need a bigger bang for my calorie bucks. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The recipe.

 

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 The modified mise.  No celery for starters.   But if Thomas Keller  can turn his nose up at celery I feel no real regret that there’s none here. 

 

When we emigrated to the US, my parents opted to travel by ship. The inclusion of V8 in the breakfast menu intrigued me so I drank it daily. By the end of the week,  I began to break out in hives and no one could determine the cause. Celery has been my nemesis ever since as this foul smelling fiber stick seems to be ubiquitous in American cooking. It's easy to detect in salads because, as a cheap filler, it's used with abandon. Everything else, I need to ask about it's inclusion before ordering.

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2 hours ago, Anna N said:

 So we finally did get around to trying the onion petals. I would describe them as onion-flavoured, beige Cheezies or as simply another salt delivery system. But because they are all salty and seemingly nothing more than air, I suspect one could soon become addicted to them.  I shall try to avoid falling into that trap.   Need a bigger bang for my calorie bucks. 

Sounds like upscale Funyuns.  So, yes, addicting.

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11 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Sounds like upscale Funyuns.  So, yes, addicting.

 I think that is how Kerry was trying to describe them.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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29 minutes ago, weinoo said:

I love celery.  Braised celery is, perhaps, the apotheosis of its existence.

 I quite like celery raw and cooked but when it’s not in the house then I can manage without it quite well. V8 juice, however, is an unwelcome diuretic and deprives me of much-needed sleep. 😫

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I think for some (females especially) celery brings up nightmarish flashbacks to diets in the 70's. I don't use it in any kind of foundational "trinity", but I do enjoy the more intense vegetal taste of Chinese celery. Tt is green! I'll pick some up on occasion but a leafy bundle is a bit much for a singleton who relishes variety to use in its prime.  Ah!- relish - those nasty dried out relish trays of the past....

Edited by heidih (log)
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I vaguely recall my snooty grandmother having a cut glass dish just for celery on her table.  Don't recall anyone ever eating a single

stalk of the stuff.  Maybe the dish was real but the celery stalks were fake?  

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4 minutes ago, heidih said:

Well alot of those celery dishes had a raised image of celery sticks in them. With the pale celery that was favored - hard to tell the diff!

 

Stuffed with cheese whiz.

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