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ElsieD

Newfoundland Re-Visited

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Some of you may recall that in 2016 I had a blog about our trip to Newfoundland.  We are going there again tomorrow for a week, returning July 1 and I thought that since we are going to, and eating at, places different from that year, I would do another blog.  When I booked our flights and accommodations (7 places in 8 nights) last February, June 23rd seemed like a long ways away.  Yet here we are, about to leave.   I hope some of you will follow along as we travel through the province.
 
 
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Excellent. We want to go there soon too. Don’t forget to pack the translation tool.😁

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Can tell us more about the needed translations?

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@lindag  Sure, here are some:

 

Scuff = dance, as in, "Would you like to get out on the floor for a scuff?"

Proper t'ing = the right thing to be doing

Pissquicks = slippers, especially slippers made by cutting the tops off old rubber boots

Ourn = ours.  From the contraction of "our one".

Nog head = one who is thick-headed

Burning weather = being cold enough to cause frostbite

Togged down = dressed up

Streel = Untidy person

 

So there's a few.  They also have a tendency to add "s" to words, particularly verbs.  "If you comes along the bay...."

 

 

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That's the one.  Also need an audio version for regular language! :-))

Have fun.

We have a couple of Newfie friends out here in the West....such nice people.  And hilarious.

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

@lindag  Sure, here are some:

 

Scuff = dance, as in, "Would you like to get out on the floor for a scuff?"

Proper t'ing = the right thing to be doing

Pissquicks = slippers, especially slippers made by cutting the tops off old rubber boots

Ourn = ours.  From the contraction of "our one".

Nog head = one who is thick-headed

Burning weather = being cold enough to cause frostbite

Togged down = dressed up

Streel = Untidy person

 

So there's a few.  They also have a tendency to add "s" to words, particularly verbs.  "If you comes along the bay...."

 

 

Sounds like  great time!

 

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Would love to go there.  Have several friends from Newfoundland and heavens knows, all our best comics hail from there.   The topography looks amazing.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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We are on our way.  Just landed in Halifax where we are offloading a bunch of people and picking some up.  We remain on board.   :D

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Oooooooh, I'm excited!!!!

 

Our neighbors helped their friends move to Newfoundland a couple years ago (they are Mennonite and would go to the ends of the earth to help someone :) )  and they brought me back the most wonderful blueberry jam.

 

I can't wait to see your food and adventures!  Anything good to eat on the plane?

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Yay! Loved last year. Looking forward to this one!

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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We have landed, gotten our car and made the first, most important stop.

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A little more info.....

 

We flew into Stephenville, on the west coast, a town of about 6,700 people.  We are headed west, to Cape St. George, which is where we are staying tonight.  We are driving on highway 460, turning right on to highway 463 at a place called Jerry's Nose and then proceeding to go around the cape.  More later.

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2 hours ago, ElsieD said:

A little more info.....

 

We flew into Stephenville, on the west coast, a town of about 6,700 people.  We are headed west, to Cape St. George, which is where we are staying tonight.  We are driving on highway 460, turning right on to highway 463 at a place called Jerry's Nose and then proceeding to go around the cape.  More later.

Interesting.  Following you on the map.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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We went around the cape and saw some interesting folk art.  Below is a picture of one such place.  We saw the gentleman owner outside so we drove in to ask the 1) what it was, 2) where it came from and 3) could we take a picture.  He was a typical older Newfoundland man, with a very thick accent not helped by not having many teeth.  But also very typical, he was very friendly.  It turned out that these were nothing more than rocks which had been painted and gussied up some and came from a quarry a couple of miles up the road and yes, of course we could take a picture.  He also said "thar's a big blow today" which of course meant that it was very windy.  Which it was.  As we were leaving, I said "it was nice to have met you". He responded, "nice to meet you too, b'y". B'y being a typical Newfoundland term.

 

We arrived at the Inn at the Cape st 5:45 and it turned out that supper was at 6:00, not 6:30 as advertised.  There are only 5 of us here, so the food was put out at 6:00 and you served yourself although the owner/chef was always around.  The offerings were fish chowder, deep fried cod, meatloaf, French fries, coleslaw, and salad.  Dessert was sugar or lemon meringue pie or ice cream with rhubarb sauce.  I had a bit of everything and I failed in my duty to take pictures as my battery in my tablet had died.  The food was reasonably good, the fish excellent.  The battery recharged while we were having dinner so starting tomorrow, there will be pictures of food. 

 

It turns out the owner of the inn is also the mayor of this town which made for some interesting conversation.  We shared a table with a couple from Welland, another city in Ontario.  It turned out that this couple's house sitter, a next door neighbour, is the brother of John's former best friend's wife.  I say former because his friend passed away 4 years ago.  It can be a small world sometimes.

 

As far as food on the plane goes, the flight has two legs.  On the first one, I had some almonds.  On the second leg I had a bag of chips and a little package of Walker's shortbread cookies.  And that was it for food until we got here.  We were ravenous.

 

Tomorrow we are going south, to Port-aux-Basques and going east from there as far as the road takes us, which is to a restored lighthouse.  We have a place in mind for lunch which apparently serves very good fish. 

 

Until tomorrow.  Time for a glass of wine.

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Edited by ElsieD Deleted a line (log)
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The view from our balcony.  Whales were sighted earlier today but alas,  we have not yet seen any.

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We are currently just outside of Deer Lake in a new place.

We had spme very good fish... salt fish cakes fr John...sauteed halibut with scuncions for me.  Carrots and turnips for veg for both of us.  Yellow pea soup for dinner last night.  Can't wait to hear how you like the west coast. 

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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We have had breakfast and are about to leave for Port-aux-Basques.  For breakfast I had waffles with fresh fruit and cream and a couple of slices of bacon, john had waffles, bacon and sausages.  Also on offer were eggs, however you wanted them, various cereals, home fries and baked beans.  There were also freshly baked strawberry rhubarb muffins.  We are not big breakfast eaters but we did take a couple of muffins, bananas, and coffee with us to have a bit later.  So on with the day.

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So you are now one hour and a half ahead of Eastern Daylight Time?  I don't know if NL does Daylight. 


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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13 minutes ago, Darienne said:

So you are now one hour and a half ahead of Eastern Daylight Time?  I don't know if NL does Daylight. 

 

They prefer darkness, but every 12 hours or so the sun appears; for a time....

 

;)

 

 

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Moose alert! Just passed a lit-up sign warning us to be on the lookout for moose.  A couple at last night's inn told us they saw one on the way to and another on the way back yesterday from Port-aux-Basques on this same stretch of road.

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A dreary day, but we are almost at our destination, and that means food!

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3 hours ago, Darienne said:

So you are now one hour and a half ahead of Eastern Daylight Time?  I don't know if NL does Daylight. 

 

Yes, we are 1 1/2 hours ahead.  According to the song "Half an Hour Later" the  half hour is because God wanted extra time to make Newfoundland.  Good job, too!

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that very interesting.   I didn't know there was a 1/2 anywhere

 

found this map :

 

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@rotuts  Did you happen to look up the lyrics?

 

 We have just had lunch at the Sea Shore Restaurant in Margaree, east of Channel-Port Aux Basques.  We started with cod cakes, and had one each.  They were maybe the best cod cakes we have ever had.  Light, hot, delicious.  I had cod au gratin,  which is very common in the restaurants here and it too was very good.  John had fish and chips which came with two huge pieces of fish.  If the fries look dark to you it is because they are - he orders them that way.  I saw bakeapple crepe on the menu and whenever I see bakeapples, I'm all over it.  So, I finished with that.  Yummy.  The hot dishes were so hot that the initial bite of the cod cakes darn near burned my  mouth and the cod su gratin when it arrived, was still bubbling.  Very satisfied, we are.  Should hold us til dinner.

 

We were told that downtown Port-aux-Basques is an interesting place so we will check that out before we head back to our accommodation tonight in York Harbour.

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