Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

gulfporter

Remembering Anthony Bourdain, 1956–2018

Recommended Posts

Kitchen Confidental got me into food, and The Les Halles Cookbook was my first cookbook. You see, I was a just-moved-out-of-home student with pretty much same autistic kid's palate I'd had since forever, and something about his writing convinced me it was okay to try anything. There might be a dozen cookbooks I have a deep love for, but Bourdain's wriitng holds a place in my heart that the Joe Beef book and etc never will.


When I was out the other night there was a special on offer -- pig's trotter stuffed with cotechino. It seemed fitting.

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's interesting how we each react differently.

I don't feel I'll be able to open one of his books, re-watch one of his shows or watch him being interviewed, for quite some time.

But I will, eventually. :(


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had been rereading a kindle version of Kitchen Confidential, a bit at a time, over the last month and am about half-way through it. Don’t know when I will be able to continue.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched a lot of The Travel Channel marathon and some on CNN yesterday.  Had to make myself stop, it was heartbreaking.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

A few hours ago, I went to Les Halles (15 John Street, NYC) with friends to see if it's still in business for lunchbourdain.thumb.JPG.eedb53c60e5607662a613df27832826d.JPG.

 

dcarch

 


Edited by dcarch (log)
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Les Halles hasn't been in business in a long time - at least a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, Les Halles closed over two years ago. I’m a bit surprised they still have their signage up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a photo of Les Halles in Tokyo. I wanted to take pictures of our dinner but the people I was with were uncomfortable about it, so, it's the only photo I have. Sorry, not incredibly exciting.

 

LesHallesJP.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/11/2018 at 3:16 PM, ChrisTaylor said:

Kitchen Confidental got me into food, and The Les Halles Cookbook was my first cookbook. You see, I was a just-moved-out-of-home student with pretty much same autistic kid's palate I'd had since forever, and something about his writing convinced me it was okay to try anything. There might be a dozen cookbooks I have a deep love for, but Bourdain's wriitng holds a place in my heart that the Joe Beef book and etc never will.


When I was out the other night there was a special on offer -- pig's trotter stuffed with cotechino. It seemed fitting.

 

You have certainly made up for lost time. :P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@dcarch you said you’ve eaten at Bourdain’s restaurants. I missing something? AFAIK his only true executive chef job was Les Halles decades ago and the restaurant in NYC closed in March 2016. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

@dcarch you said you’ve eaten at Bourdain’s restaurants. I missing something? AFAIK his only true executive chef job was Les Halles decades ago and the restaurant in NYC closed in March 2016. 

 

Sometime ago, I had business meetings at One Seaport plaza, 100 William St and and 116 John St. Every time going from the subway to the buildings, I passed by Les Halles (15 John St.). A few times had lunch and dinner with clients and friends there.

 

dcarch

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This evening I've been assembling choucroute garnie. Total coincidence, but Iggy Pop's Lust for Life is playing in the background. Seems about right.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah...a good choucroute garnie, like Iggy, is worth a million in prizes... :P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evan Kleiman's Good Food podcast/radio show on KCRW devoted today's episode to Anthony Bourdain:  Remembering Anthony Bourdain

 

The Good Food blog contains personal remembrances from several of the show's staff: Good Food Remembers Anthony Bourdain.  

 

That blog post also contains a link to a Los Angeles Times article that Evan wrote:  He may have had a bad boy persona, but Anthony Bourdain was lovely, loyal and so damn smart

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like a cliche but watching the first Paris episode of No Reservations changed my life. I watched it in summer 2010, just after staying six months doing a language course in Paris, and nearly five months travelling in India prior to that. After checking out more of the show I quickly realized how much I had been missing in both places, that this was the way to travel, not through the eyes of Lonely Planet's guidebook.

 

When I travel today the most important part is to find out, beforehand, where do the locals eat and drink and how do I get there. I always carry a list of places wherever I go, but also keep my eyes open to exciting experiences which may pop up along the way. I will often check out the places he visited if we happen to cross paths.

 

The second life changing moment was the episode Techniques Specials. I finally learnt how to cut a frigging onion properly, and how to roast a chicken, that browing the meat properly was a good idea, that using cheap Yugoslavian red wine in cooking works fine. The pasta sauce recipe has become one of my staples, I can do it blindfolded and it tastes amazing every time.

 

I started buying his books and trying out his recipes. His influence snowballed into me checking out other cook books, Joel Robuchon massive brick for instance, I started making aioli in a mortar and pestle, I make my own pasta and chili oil, I spend ages baking sour dough bread. I know how to boil a freaking egg. I had pieds et paquet at that same restaurant in Paris, I had lamb brains in Beirut, last autumn I prepared and ate sheep testicles at our yearly smoked sheep head feast (Smalahove, not too different from that awesome Iceland episode). None of this would have happened without Tony.

 

It still hurts that he's gone and that he left so suddenly. It was like losing a mentor, or an older brother you could turn to for advice. Even though I never met him. However... his influence will still be there. When I try to find the best recipe for Dan dan noodles I think of @bourdain and type "the best f***ing authentic dan dan mien recipe" into google. Sometimes I hit a home run with that technique.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×