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shar999

Shrimp and Grits

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3 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Here is what I bought. 12 oz isn't a lot.  I have only used the Carolina Gold Rice so far...I have another pkg of regular grits to use first.  Give the double boiler method a try and cook them long enough that we aren't grainy, the get nice and smooth.  Just check the liquid level every 20 minutes or so.  Delicious.

 

  •  Antebellum Coarse Yellow Grits - bag / 12 oz
  • 6x Carolina Gold Rice - bag / 14 oz
  • 1x Carolina Gold Rice Grits - bag / 12 oz
  • 1x Colonial Coarse Pencil Cob Grits - bag / 12 oz
  • 1x Laurel-Aged Charleston Gold Rice - bag / 14 oz
  • 1x Rustic Polenta Integrale - bag / 12 oz
  • 2x Charleston Gold Brown Rice - bag / 14oz
  • 1x Sea Island Red Peas - bag / 14 oz

 

 

Now that I see your list I could swear I have seen it somewhere before along with a comment on shipping costs.  For the life of me, I can't find it.  Pencil Cob Grits sound interesting.

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I have had wonderful luck with this Slow Cooker Polenta.  I imagine it would work for grits, too.  Nice to not have to babysit them.

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

 

Now that I see your list I could swear I have seen it somewhere before along with a comment on shipping costs.  For the life of me, I can't find it.  Pencil Cob Grits sound interesting.

It was under Cooking with Grains and here is what I said:  "Just placed my order.  The total weight is 10 lbs and the shipping to me here in Penticton, BC was $56 US so not as bad as I thought."

 

Here is what the Anson Mills website says about Pencil Cob Grits:  "Settlers along the southern colonial frontier grew Pencil Cob corn, named for its very narrow cob. When there were no large local mills to produce Pencil Cob grits, milling became part of the daily food chores on the frontier. A small, round, horizontal hand-driven stone mill called a quern mill was the front-yard tool of choice for this food. A quern mill measured up to 20 inches in diameter and was composed of a heavy rotating top stone positioned on a thin, stationary bottom stone. The corn was trickled into a hole on the top of the mill as the upper stone was rotated by hand. With enough effort, grits spilled out the sides. This process was hard work, but the reward was immediate because the grits were milled directly into the cooking pot—an early rustic version of fresh milling. Anson Mills is faithful to this food form. We quern mill these grits by hand to demonstrate why this unusual corn survived into the 21st century. Pencil Cob grits say “corn” in aroma and flavor more boldly than any other grits we produce."

 

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@Okanagancook  Thanks again.  Was the rice worth the price when shipping is factored in? I have an order from filled in but I don't know if I am going to place an order.  The popping corn and the pencil cob I find particularly intriguing.

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Just looked at my invoice.

 

i received a total of 188 oz of grits, peas, rice.

total cost $98.85 us $

with shipping total cost $152.85 us$

 

pricey, yes..you could wait until the Cdn $ goes back up....Lordie, that could take awhile😩

worth it?  Probably not for the rice.  I have not tucked into the rest of it.  The rice is totally different from anything we have tasted.  I really like it, DH says he likes it but not as much as me.  It is small grain and nutty and when cooked as per their directions every grain is separate.  I would say, if you are ordering some grits get a bag of rice and see what you think.  I wanted to make up a 10 lb box for the shipping which is why I got six pkg.  I am a lot further away from them than you are.

so, depends how flush you are feeling!

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Just curious: does Anson Mills have a flat shipping rate or do they figure shipping by the pound? Geechie Boy Mills has a flat rate like Rancho Gordo, so it is worth ordering a lot at one time. They sell Carolina Rice, but not the variety of some other mail order places. Mainly I buy grits and now blue popcorn from them, which is delicious.

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From their website

Our minimum order is any combination of four 12 oz. bags, or one 10 lb. box.”

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Posted (edited)

Got some coarse  stone ground grits from Bradley's country store in Tallahassee a few years ago that have been vacuumed sealed in the freezer.   Never used them much due to the time needed to prepare them.   Tonight used the pot in pot method with my pressure cooker to cook the grits.  Worked very well.   Wife hates shrimp so pared them with Patagonian scallops 

 

97D3C721-5A2C-4DDF-95B1-E3D6A0F7A4A5.jpeg


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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I bought a 2lb bag of “Charleston’s Best” at the airport in Charleston in March. No doubt they were overpriced. But they are white grits which to me, who knows only knows polenta due to my Italian heritage, were a bit different. As I’ve said previously I did increase the liquid to solid ratio and it was easy to make delicious grits. The recipe on the bag had me rinse them. I likely won’t do that again— it just left a mess. The end result was great and the easiest thing I made. 

  

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@ElsieD -- my apologies for delayed reply; I've been on vacation. 

 

These are my grits of choice. I can get them at any grocery store. The link is from the US Amazon site, so I don't  know if Quaker sells in Canada or not. I am happy to buy a bag and send to you, if you wish.

 

These are hominy grits, more common in the western portions of the South.  Truthfully, I can't tell a big difference in finished taste and texture in the finished product; it's much more what you put in 'em. Milk or water? Cheese or no cheese? Cream or no cream? Seasonings? Sauces?

 

I like to make my plain grits with half and half whole milk and water. I'll add a little cream cheese for creaminess.

 

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Quaker oats are very common up here, but I've never seen the grits. Probably a regional thing...I'm guessing gallon jugs of molasses are probably harder to find where you live, for example, but every supermarket has them here.

 

Similarly, my California-bred late wife was shocked to find that the liquor stores here carried no more than a dozen kinds of tequila (selection has increased since, but it's still sparse), while the rum shelves spanned 16 feet of wall.

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7 hours ago, chromedome said:

Quaker oats are very common up here, but I've never seen the grits. Probably a regional thing...I'm guessing gallon jugs of molasses are probably harder to find where you live, for example, but every supermarket has them here.

 

Similarly, my California-bred late wife was shocked to find that the liquor stores here carried no more than a dozen kinds of tequila (selection has increased since, but it's still sparse), while the rum shelves spanned 16 feet of wall.

 

I grew up in a county which was, for a time, the largest sorghum molasses producing county in the country. We can get it in gallon jugs, but usually it's in quart pails that look like paint buckets.

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Just now, kayb said:

 

I grew up in a county which was, for a time, the largest sorghum molasses producing county in the country. We can get it in gallon jugs, but usually it's in quart pails that look like paint buckets.

So any idea why rest of country is clueless? Distribution issues, packaging? Hell I'm interested...

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8 hours ago, kayb said:

@ElsieD -- my apologies for delayed reply; I've been on vacation. 

 

These are my grits of choice. I can get them at any grocery store. The link is from the US Amazon site, so I don't  know if Quaker sells in Canada or not. I am happy to buy a bag and send to you, if you wish.

 

These are hominy grits, more common in the western portions of the South.  Truthfully, I can't tell a big difference in finished taste and texture in the finished product; it's much more what you put in 'em. Milk or water? Cheese or no cheese? Cream or no cream? Seasonings? Sauces?

 

I like to make my plain grits with half and half whole milk and water. I'll add a little cream cheese for creaminess.

 

 

I have never seen these that I know of.  Thank you for your kind offer, but  before you go to all that trouble, we will be going to Syracuse sometime in the next couple of months and I will check Wegman's to see if they have it.  I wonder too if Trader Joe's might carry grits.  Maybe not that brand but something actually called grits.  Can't go to Syracuse and not visit Trader Joe's!

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30 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

I have never seen these that I know of.  Thank you for your kind offer, but  before you go to all that trouble, we will be going to Syracuse sometime in the next couple of months and I will check Wegman's to see if they have it.  I wonder too if Trader Joe's might carry grits.  Maybe not that brand but something actually called grits.  Can't go to Syracuse and not visit Trader Joe's!

 

Well, the offer stands. Hope you find them in Syracuse, though I'd be surprised if you do,  as they're generally a Southern staple but less common "up North."

 

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