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Nuts for nuts - suggestions on what to do


Rajala
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I have around 3 kgs of hazelnuts, 4 kgs of almonds and 2 kgs of walnuts. I've made so many different kind of pralinés that I think I have enough for this year. So what should I do with all these nuts? Do you have any amazing recipes or ideas for me? I'm thinking that I should at least try do to some kind of walnut tart, but I'm not sure what to do with all the other nuts. :D 

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Hmm, baklava is an interesting suggestion. I made a batch like 8 years ago, with dough that I bought. Maybe it's time to make my own filo dough? :D 

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I keep nuts of all kinds in the freezer. I use them in granola, and a great deal in holiday cooking and baking. Always good to have a handful of toasted nuts to throw on salads, etc.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, Rajala said:

Hmm, baklava is an interesting suggestion. I made a batch like 8 years ago, with dough that I bought. Maybe it's time to make my own filo dough? :D 

 

Oh no - purchased phyllo is fine - its all about the layering and filling. ChefCrash's method is wonderful. No more tedious layer/brush/layer/brush.  I suggest a browse through the topic.

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3 hours ago, heidih said:

 

Oh no - purchased phyllo is fine - its all about the layering and filling. ChefCrash's method is wonderful. No more tedious layer/brush/layer/brush.  I suggest a browse through the topic.

 

I'll read it. Thanks!

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8 minutes ago, Lisa Shock said:

THIS hazelnut pie is very good. It won a contest in 2009 from the US hazelnut grower's association.

 

Have you tried it?

 

What's a good replacement light corn syrup? Glucose? Corn syrup isn't something that's very common over here. 

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15 minutes ago, Rajala said:

 

Have you tried it?

 

What's a good replacement light corn syrup? Glucose? Corn syrup isn't something that's very common over here. 

Where are you? Can you get golden syrup where you are?

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

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18 minutes ago, Rajala said:

What's a good replacement light corn syrup? Glucose? Corn syrup isn't something that's very common over here. 

 

Glucose is usually more viscous than corn syrup, but otherwise is a good substitute.  Glucose plus a little extra liquid?  Corn syrup is closer consistency to honey.

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9 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

Where are you? Can you get golden syrup where you are?

 

I'm in Sweden. There are some syrups you can get here, but I'm not sure how close they're to their American counterparts.

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3 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Glucose is usually more viscous than corn syrup, but otherwise is a good substitute.  Glucose plus a little extra liquid?  Corn syrup is closer consistency to honey.

 

Not sure how important it is in that recipe though, maybe it'll do fine with glucose. I have no problems with trying and failing :D 

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Haha, I just found a bottle of Karo light corn syrup in my pantry, stowed away in a corner. Best before April 2018. I guess that's safe to use.

 

Problem solved for now.

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I’ve always wondered the best way to skin hazelnuts. I haven’t been successful like chocolatiers I’m seeing on Instagram who get the skins completely removed and place it on top of a bonbon. Any suggestions?

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Yeah, that's what I do as well. A few of them rolled a way on my countertop last time, and I discovered that it was extremely easy to get the skin of when they were completely cold. I haven't tried again in a while, but I'm going to try to leave them for a few hours to cool down next time. Most of the time I read instructions, I get the impression that I should just let them cold for a short while, but maybe it's just lost in translation for me. :D 

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2 hours ago, Rajala said:

 

Have you tried it?

 

What's a good replacement light corn syrup? Glucose? Corn syrup isn't something that's very common over here. 

Yes - glucose. Oops - see this has already been well answered!

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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58 minutes ago, Daniel D said:

I’ve always wondered the best way to skin hazelnuts.

 

I buy them with skins already removed, saves so much time so worth every cent.

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I think Rose Levy Beranbaum suggested boiling hazelnuts with baking soda, the water turns brown, you strain it and the skins come right off, then  you can toast them.  I did this once, it works but it's easier to get skinned hazelnuts from my distributor now so I don't bother any more....

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Yeah, much easier to get them without skin straight away. But the price I paid for these skinned ones were so good that I couldn't say no. And it's not that tedious to remove it, it's not pistachios. :D 

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18 hours ago, heidih said:

Well sealed and stored in freezer I hope?  My immediate thoughts are baklava and spiced nuts. 

 

 

 

Thanks for the link on the baklava, Heidi. I love baklava and spanakopita, but the air turns blue in my kitchen when I make it from the frustration of trying to separate the paper thin layers without them drying out and tearing while painting each layer with butter. If this method works, I see myself making baklava, spanakopita and tiropita much more frequently. :D

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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10 hours ago, JeanneCake said:

I think Rose Levy Beranbaum suggested boiling hazelnuts with baking soda, the water turns brown, you strain it and the skins come right off, 

 

I did this once, never again... It was so messy!!

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19 hours ago, keychris said:

 

I buy them with skins already removed, saves so much time so worth every cent.

 

After trying to skin them myself several times now, I think I’ll take your advice!  I’m too much of a perfectionist and it bothers me when there is a little bit of skin remaining.

 

The local grocery stores where I live don’t sell them with skins removed. I guess I’ll have to find a distributor and buy a bigger batch than I need and freeze them.

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