Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

PassionateAmateur

Slow-roast short ribs?

Recommended Posts

Hill Country BBQ in NYC serves this meltingly tender, fabulous beef short rib --I believe it's just salt, pepper and hours and hours of smoke.  (I dream about it sometimes.)  Though I can't recreate the smoke in my Brooklyn apartment without getting a visit from the fire department, I was thinking that a slow roast could still be very pleasing.  Has anyone tried this with short ribs?  I was thinking a 225 degree oven until the meat comes to 180.  Sound right?  Also -- would I need to sear first to get a good roasty/crusty exterior (which I don't need to do for my porchetta recipe - though that gets a wine/drippings slathering every 1/2 hour or so, so the sugars might be doing the work there)?  Any thoughts/experience/technigques appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Braising short ribs makes a beautiful dish. Red wine...a little soy...onions... garlic...tbsp tomato paste....a hint of 5 spice or cinnamon.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can't use a smoker , your best option is to soak the short ribs in 3 parts water / 1 part wrights liquid smoke ( i like the apple wood version) for 2-4 hours. Then add whatever rub you like and roast in the oven @ 250F till probe tender which could be a good 6-9 hours depending on how big your short ribs are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a sous vide setup? If so, check this out for another possible route:

 

https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/smokerless-smoked-brisket


So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting.  I gave up on my sous vide setup -- took too much real estate.  But thanks!  

 

I'm curious that everyone's suggestions avoid actually slow-roasting, and none of my gazillion cookbooks mention it as a possibility for short ribs either. Anyone have any thoughts on why this pretty basic technique doesn't get used for this cut?  I'm thinking I need to run some experiments even at the risk of ruining a glorious piece of meat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, PassionateAmateur said:

I'm curious that everyone's suggestions avoid actually slow-roasting, and none of my gazillion cookbooks mention it as a possibility for short ribs either.

Click.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, PassionateAmateur said:

Interesting.  I gave up on my sous vide setup -- took too much real estate.  But thanks!  

 

This puzzles me.  My anova takes up less space than almost any of my kitchen toys, rotor-stator homogenizer possibly excepted.

 

Roast a sparerib and report back.  I would brown in a pan first, possibly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

300F does not sound like slow roasting to me.  I'd try 180 or even 170.

 

 I don’t think I’d choose to go that low. My point was that slow roasted short ribs were not unheard of.  


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a small Manhattan apt and have a stovetop smoker... it's great for adding smoke flavor.  I'd rub, then stovetop smoke it for 20 min or so, then roast as you desire to get the tenderness.  You could always hit it with another round of smoke afterwards if necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do have a stovetop smoker -- will start there then go to a nice low 250 oven until they're melting off the bones.  Thanks for all the suggestions!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

This puzzles me.  My anova takes up less space than almost any of my kitchen toys, rotor-stator homogenizer possibly excepted.

 

I tend to do multi-course dinner parties for 10 or so guests and the counter space for the water bath is just too much -- kills my prep space for all the other courses.  Ends up more of an inconvenience.  If it turns out I won the lottery last night and can buy a brownstone, i will definitely revisit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@PassionateAmateur

 

You know your work habits better than any of us but it’s hard to understand why your sous vide set up needs to occupy counter space.  In the town house up north where @Kerry Beal and I spend a good part of the summer, the sous vide is on the floor in the hallway.  I believe other members have it in the basement which may not be an option for you. 


Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PassionateAmateur said:

I tend to do multi-course dinner parties for 10 or so guests and the counter space for the water bath is just too much -- kills my prep space for all the other courses.  Ends up more of an inconvenience.  If it turns out I won the lottery last night and can buy a brownstone, i will definitely revisit!

 

In addition to what @Anna N just said, you could cook your meat days in advance, chill in an ice bath and refrigerate.  Just before service finish in (for example) a hot oven.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, PassionateAmateur said:

In a Brooklyn apartment, it's not just the kitchen that's small.

 

No sidewalk?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, @PassionateAmateur - I used to do what you're talking about every once in a while - I would make a 4-5 course tasting menu for 8-10 people every couple of months, in a small Manhattan kitchen.  Sous vide was my best friend and I could make everything (except the fish) the week or so before, then retherm for service and everything tasted just like it would have if made fresh.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...