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gfron1

Andrey Dubovic online classes

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1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

All of the Savour materials are available all the time, so you could easily view the videos at once and print out all the recipes (it isn't a "course" in the sense of Andrey). In my opinion, however, I think it is primarily in the decoration of bonbons that Kirsten Tibballs (of Savour) has the most to offer. I enjoy her videos a lot and she is a wonderful teacher (her recent video on the "feathering" technique, which is referred to on this forum as "dendrites," is presented in such a clear way that I was able to follow it the first time I tried).

 

But if it is chiefly recipes that you need at this point (as opposed to decoration of bonbons), then I would go an entirely different direction and purchase some books from Peter Greweling, Ewald Notter, and Jean-Pierre Wybauw. You don't really need videos to make a ganache. Once you see what the authors I listed have to say and develop your own offerings, then you could take a more advanced look at decorating techniques with Andrey Dubovik (I didn't find most of his recipes for fillings useful).

Great feedback Jim,  I´ve already bought Ewald Notter´s book when I started a month ago because I found the recipes so useful. I see I wasn't mistaken with my choice... Thanks again!

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1 hour ago, gfron1 said:

Looking at your work I don't think Andrey's class is where I would focus my time and money. I'm seeing so many online courses pop-up, and ultimately they're all trying to capitalize on the Instagram era of chocolate making where the newest design is what everyone wants to emulate. But, as Jim said, you already have emulated some of his designs which suggests that you have a good artistic eye for figuring out how techniques are performed. Find a workshop that solidifies your fundamentals and skills...not a design.

Thanks gfron1! Do yo have any recommendation for online workshops that teaches fundamentals? As I live in Argentina I don´have access to Savour, Melissa Coppel or another similar workshops...

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9 hours ago, Barb19 said:

Great feedback Jim,  I´ve already bought Ewald Notter´s book when I started a month ago because I found the recipes so useful. I see I wasn't mistaken with my choice... Thanks again!

As was stated recently in another thread, Greweling's Chocolates & Confections is highly recommended. He doesn't have as many recipes for bonbon fillings as Notter or Wybauw (though I use Greweling recipes in nearly every batch I make), and it is true that Notter has a great deal of information on theory and technique, most people consider Greweling the expert on those subjects.  If you want to know why something went wrong, he is the source. The same applies when you want to start developing your own fillings.

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9 hours ago, Barb19 said:

Thanks gfron1! Do yo have any recommendation for online workshops that teaches fundamentals? As I live in Argentina I don´have access to Savour, Melissa Coppel or another similar workshops...

Savour has online videos, and again, I believe you have demonstrated a level of skill that would suggest you could grow from unsupervised classes. Ecole is the other that I know many people have participated. They too have on-site, but also video.

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11 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

Savour has online videos, and again, I believe you have demonstrated a level of skill that would suggest you could grow from unsupervised classes. Ecole is the other that I know many people have participated. They too have on-site, but also video.

Ecole would be great for the tempering, business etc side of it - but most of the decorating comes when the students attend the master's classes in various locations around the world. Not to discourage anyone taking Ecole (after all I am the shelf life tutor)!

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Thanks for everything guys! You are all amazingly generous sharing your knowledge and giving advise!! I’ll check out all the options you gave me, as I’m starting I have a lot to learn and sometimes it is overwhelming. Have a great day! 

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I'm a fan of Savour. You can join for a month and see if there is enough content for you. Of all the online courses/workshops  I've followed, I have gotten the most from Savour. Some of her projects are a little involved, but she can not be faulted for being thorough and easy to understand. Plus, you get the added benefit of guest chocolatiers like Melissa Coppel.


Edited by julie99nl quote error (log)
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On 2/7/2019 at 3:23 PM, Barb19 said:

Thanks gfron1! Do yo have any recommendation for online workshops that teaches fundamentals? As I live in Argentina I don´have access to Savour, Melissa Coppel or another similar workshops...

I'd recommend contacting savour directly via the email on their website and asking if they know of anyone else that has any issues in argentina - they may be able to help you subscribe successfully.

 

Disclaimer: I've been part of their online classes since day 1 :)

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14 hours ago, keychris said:

I'd recommend contacting savour directly via the email on their website and asking if they know of anyone else that has any issues in argentina - they may be able to help you subscribe successfully.

 

Disclaimer: I've been part of their online classes since day 1 :)

Oh! No!! What I meant is that I don’t have access to the hands on workshops not the online classes 😂 i’ll take julie99nl and subscribe for one month and see all the content to check out if the annual subscription is worth it for me

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For those who are interested in Andrey Dubovik's famous "eye" technique of decorating, he himself has now posted a video on Instagram. The video is brief but shows it clearly...except perhaps for the hours and hours of practice it takes to perfect it (speaking from experience).

 

 

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On 6/24/2018 at 10:12 AM, gfron1 said:

The funny thing about this to me is that with my old Badger I never could have pulled it off - not enough pressure. But now that I have the big ol' California Air Tool that YOU suggested I buy, I'm blowing through the gun with no issues whatsoever. I did also switch to a gravity feed gun at Andrey's recommendation and that i am sure is helping. 

Old post, but I was wondering if you could share what model did you get. I am still with my little Badger, which has been getting super hot lately and yesterday while I was using it, was spaying moisture (I wasn't using the bottle with colored CB, but just the air from the top portion of the bottom fed mini gun), so I am not sure whats the deal with that. Michigan is humid and my new kitchen doesn't have an ac vent and it gets warm and super humid. Also I have noticed your gradient are pretty smooth, of course due to user skill, but I wondering what do you use for airbrush. Again, I am super behind on all matter of chocolate and colors right now. Trying to catch up :-P

Thank you!


Vanessa

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On 9/3/2019 at 4:30 PM, Desiderio said:

Old post, but I was wondering if you could share what model did you get. I am still with my little Badger, which has been getting super hot lately and yesterday while I was using it, was spaying moisture (I wasn't using the bottle with colored CB, but just the air from the top portion of the bottom fed mini gun), so I am not sure whats the deal with that. Michigan is humid and my new kitchen doesn't have an ac vent and it gets warm and super humid. Also I have noticed your gradient are pretty smooth, of course due to user skill, but I wondering what do you use for airbrush. Again, I am super behind on all matter of chocolate and colors right now. Trying to catch up 😛

Thank you!

Bought on Amazon: California Air Tools CAT-4620AC Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free 2.0 hp 4.0 gallon Aluminum Twin Tank Electric Portable Air Compressor, Silver

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Thank you so much :-) I am so looking forward to the next workshop!


Edited by Desiderio (log)
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Vanessa

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Does anyone have plans to pick up his book Pralinarium? I love the pictures, not sure how it is on content, but I'm sure there alot in there. Recently they just did another printing of the book, so I was looking into it, shipping to US is 40 euro. I'm kicking myself a little bit right now, his page shows that you can do a free local pick of the book from Warsaw, Poland. I was just there a few weeks ago! Totally missed out!

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The book is pretty low quality. It's possibly worth it if you're looking for techniques and step by step for coloring. Other than that, there are much better books. I regret my purchase a bit, I didn't expect pictures in it to be so low quality.

 

Regarding Savour, I've been a member for two years on a monthly basis. 🤦‍♂️

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On 9/11/2019 at 1:28 AM, Rajala said:

It's possibly worth it if you're looking for techniques and step by step for coloring.


That would be the only reason I would even consider wanting it. Coffee table books are of no interest to me, tell me how you did it. :D


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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19 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

That would be the only reason I would even consider wanting it. Coffee table books are of no interest to me, tell me how you did it.

 

It's just a warning for anyone expecting it to be a great book. He's no Greweling. :)

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To follow up on the book, @Rajala - you say it’s still good for learning the technique? It’s unfortunate that it is of a low quality, but is the information quality? I was looking at getting the book, but I can’t find a copy for sale at the moment. I want it to learn technique and was going to ask if anyone here is selling their copy (say they’ve taken the course and feel the no longer need it). I want to take the course, but am unable to budget that much time and money this season. So I thought the book would be a good way to support Dubovik sharing his knowledge and also learn some new decorations. 

 

ETA: now that I read back a little, maybe the Savour online would be an affordable way to start. 


Edited by ChristysConfections (log)

- Christy -

Christy's Confections

"My rule is to welcome you with hospitality and to send you away in peace." - The Deserts Fathers

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1 hour ago, ChristysConfections said:

To follow up on the book, @Rajala - you say it’s still good for learning the technique? It’s unfortunate that it is of a low quality, but is the information quality? I was looking at getting the book, but I can’t find a copy for sale at the moment. I want it to learn technique and was going to ask if anyone here is selling their copy (say they’ve taken the course and feel the no longer need it). I want to take the course, but am unable to budget that much time and money this season. So I thought the book would be a good way to support Dubovik sharing his knowledge and also learn some new decorations. 

 

ETA: now that I read back a little, maybe the Savour online would be an affordable way to start. 

 

 

About the Dubovik course:  If you look back through this thread, you will see examples of what we learned in the course, and perhaps that would help determine whether you would find the course useful. None of us on eGullet really mastered the famous "eye" technique, but some came close (closer than I did, sad to say), and there have been explanations and Instagram videos on eG since then on how it can be done. It's still very time-consuming (definitely not to be tried during the runup to Christmas!).  Another thought about the course:  It is not required that students submit photos of their work; it is possible to watch the demos, work at one's own pace, and not be concerned with taking dazzling photos. The only part that will be missing is the certificate given at the conclusion.

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@Jim D. Thank-you for the feedback about the course! It’s good to know that I could take it for the learning experience and not have to commit to the certificate. I’ll take some time to review this thread. Definitely sounds like something to explore more once the holidays are over. 


- Christy -

Christy's Confections

"My rule is to welcome you with hospitality and to send you away in peace." - The Deserts Fathers

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On 7/19/2018 at 8:22 PM, Jim D. said:

Some more efforts in the Dubovik course, some more successful than others:

 

Photos #1 and #2: The tomato simulation, mine filled with a citrus ganache (couldn't bring myself to try a tomato ganache). When I was making these, I asked myself what fool would ever do this again, but I am now going to repurpose the tomato as a cherry (colored with a dark red and bright red gradient and topped with a longer leaf and filled with cherry pàte de fruit and pistachio gianduja--a flavor combination requested by the bride and groom for their wedding).

 

dutton-11a.jpg.8dba0aca71fa4a2f89984c17a8658fdb.jpg

 

dutton-11b.jpg.9bcb2aea2574df27170b80227ae41e30.jpg

 

Photo #3: the "shades of grey" design, this filled with pineapple caramel mousse.

 

dutton-12a.jpg.227b9cbdebbbcf9980a8de71d3cc3fdd.jpg

 

Photo #4: the first of the four "eye" designs. These proved a challenge for me, and I still haven't mastered the technique, which is very dependent on consistency and temperature of the cocoa butters, temperature of the room, strength of the air stream, and too many other factors to mention. Even Andrey has varying results, but he makes the process look effortless.

 

dutton-13.jpg.6ec6c0e72fa4dc85c76ff337c6dc133d.jpg

 

Photo #5: The controversial pill design, mine filled with walnut caramel (to make the medicine go down more easily)

 

dutton-15.jpg.43551ddd7a1677af3e956894e0e4f3ed.jpg

 

Photo #6:  My version of the gianduja-filled lollipops, technically mini-lollipops because I didn't have the proper size mold. There was also the issue that most of them came out of the two-piece mold in two pieces, there was no way to judge how thin or thick the shells were until it was too late, and no way to tell exactly how much gianduja was being piped in. All in all, not a stellar result...but the cuteness factor of this design is undeniable.

 

dutton-16.jpg.b12c0672f0a9bb8fd1a0e60ff0e719f9.jpg

 

Photo #7:  The matcha truffles. As I have said elsewhere, this was my first time tasting matcha...and my last.

 

dutton-18.jpg.f738b0de6ccc7a7e6bded3f485aa88a3.jpg

 

Photo #8: And last, my attempt at the gold-dipped gianduja-filled spheres. What a production this was. It didn't help that when I pierced the spheres with a skewer to suspend them upside down (to create the "tail"), the skewers shattered the spheres. This course is definitely a test of one's ingenuity. Picture me standing over a bowl of chocolate holding a sphere in each hand upside down (pierced with a thin metal skewer, which did not shatter the gianduja) waiting for the tail to set. As gfron1 said, not to be repeated.

 

dutton-19.jpg.4af20fd744d699ec000c9d706186f067.jpg

Just trawling through the chocolate forums for the umpteenth time...and still find things that pique my curiosity further. I am pleased to note that I am in good company with my dislike of matcha 😁 However, the aesthetic allure is undeniable.  Is there a safe amount of matcha to use that would enhance the colour for something like a pistachio bonbon without overwhelming the flavour? 

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3 hours ago, Louise nadine brill said:

Just trawling through the chocolate forums for the umpteenth time...and still find things that pique my curiosity further. I am pleased to note that I am in good company with my dislike of matcha 😁 However, the aesthetic allure is undeniable.  Is there a safe amount of matcha to use that would enhance the colour for something like a pistachio bonbon without overwhelming the flavour? 

 

I am not sure, but I think @gfron1 posted on the subject of matcha (perhaps in this thread) saying that he had found the amount that would be palatable (maybe "tolerable" is a better word).

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On 12/3/2019 at 3:55 PM, Jim D. said:

 

I am not sure, but I think @gfron1 posted on the subject of matcha (perhaps in this thread) saying that he had found the amount that would be palatable (maybe "tolerable" is a better word).

I don't remember what I said anymore other than that you need to be sure to get the right one. There's drinking match and cooking matcha.

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5 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I don't remember what I said anymore other than that you need to be sure to get the right one. There's drinking match and cooking matcha.

 

Just for the record:  here is where gfron1's comment on matcha can be found.

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On 11/21/2019 at 12:26 PM, ChristysConfections said:

To follow up on the book, @Rajala - you say it’s still good for learning the technique? It’s unfortunate that it is of a low quality, but is the information quality? I was looking at getting the book, but I can’t find a copy for sale at the moment. I want it to learn technique and was going to ask if anyone here is selling their copy (say they’ve taken the course and feel the no longer need it). I want to take the course, but am unable to budget that much time and money this season. So I thought the book would be a good way to support Dubovik sharing his knowledge and also learn some new decorations. 

 

ETA: now that I read back a little, maybe the Savour online would be an affordable way to start. 

 

 

 

Sorry, didn't notice this until now. I would say that it's a good book for inspiration. There are things such as "mix the black a little bit thicker." (paraphrase) - how the hell are you supposed to know what a little bit is? You should always state how much powder you have in the cocoa butter. Like it's not a good book in that sense. I haven't touched it since I bought it.

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