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Andrey Dubovic online classes

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Sort of late to the party here as I've been on vacation for a couple of months, but wanted to chime in on the colored cocoa butters and temps.  As I mentioned a long while back on this thread, I make all my colored CBs, in varying degrees of transparency.  Rather than strain thru pantyhose, I mix, let cool, then heat up again and it seems to work well for me.  I have about 40 colors that I work with.  I used to let them go solid, and store in plastic bags, breaking off a piece as needed and heating it with the gun.  This was fine, but when painting a mold with 10 colors or so it was a  PITA.  Heating the colors via a microwave or in a water bath just wasn't getting the love for me and it took a long time.  I came up with making a box that I can store all my colors in and it keeps them at a consistent temp all day all night - ready to use whenever.  The colors are stored in glass jars and I pop each one out when I need it, paint, and then pop it back in.  Because the box is insulated, and I have a thermostat on it, it works well.  I only turn it off when I go on vacation, it doesn't eat up a lot of watts.  Anyway, something like this might work well for others.

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9 hours ago, VistaGardens said:

I came up with making a box that I can store all my colors in and it keeps them at a consistent temp all day all night - ready to use whenever.  The colors are stored in glass jars and I pop each one out when I need it, paint, and then pop it back in.  Because the box is insulated, and I have a thermostat on it, it works well.  I only turn it off when I go on vacation, it doesn't eat up a lot of watts.  Anyway, something like this might work well for others.

 

The box sounds like a good idea. I sometimes use a bread-proofing box, but because it is not tightly enclosed, its temp control is quite inconsistent. Others use a dehydrator, but that takes up a lot of space, and in many of them, the temp doesn't go as low as needed. When you have a chance, perhaps you could say more about the box you created?

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My final submission for critique. This is a re-do of the Eye technique. Closer, but not quite there, but I see the variables that I need to manipulate to get the result.

TurquoiseEye.thumb.jpg.05d635165fe5d67a1b14fd668da48ee4.jpg

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2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

The box sounds like a good idea. I sometimes use a bread-proofing box, but because it is not tightly enclosed, its temp control is quite inconsistent. Others use a dehydrator, but that takes up a lot of space, and in many of them, the temp doesn't go as low as needed. When you have a chance, perhaps you could say more about the box you created?

I started using a dehydrator, after folks here mentioned using them. My only beef is that it is so huge. I keep the colors melted at about 105F, which seems to put them in the proper temp, once I remove them and stir them up. Been keeping them in little souffle cups, so I can have a small, flexible pouring container, if I need to use them for airbrushing. But I have two beefs with it - the sheer counter space it takes up. My kitchen is tiny, and it peeves me that this is a big blocky item sitting there. Will be figuring out how to move it to a shelf near an outlet. The cord is ridiculously short on it. But also, it has a timer that means it turns off after a max of 19 hours. So, I'm having to learn how to schedule the painting properly. 

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Ok... I’m now a convert. I decided to wash my molds with soap and buff the water out with a cotton ball (because of the calcium content in my water) and I have to say the chocolates do come out pretty shiny! Here’s a couple photos. And it cuts my cleaning time in half so I’m pumped!E64AA345-F916-42C9-864A-0D731DBD9783.thumb.jpeg.698c1bb6c35b3696cc16e7e014f374b3.jpeg00216C96-82AE-4DBB-B69A-440A3369177A.thumb.jpeg.2e34cd2bfb7431216755b209d0a6831e.jpeg

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willow - what type of soap did you use?

 

beautiful shine!

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3 hours ago, RobertM said:

willow - what type of soap did you use?

 

beautiful shine!

 

Green works dishwashing liquid...7B49153D-9E4B-4B85-B47E-42BA6EFF03F6.thumb.jpeg.b4ea8d4ad1278266dc7124dd7b38c1de.jpeg

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On 8/7/2018 at 4:51 AM, Jim D. said:

 

The box sounds like a good idea. I sometimes use a bread-proofing box, but because it is not tightly enclosed, its temp control is quite inconsistent. Others use a dehydrator, but that takes up a lot of space, and in many of them, the temp doesn't go as low as needed. When you have a chance, perhaps you could say more about the box you created?

 

The box isn't "hard" to make, but it does have a few steps.  The short version is that I took a cambro and cut a hole in it using a special saw like they use to cut casts off of arms and legs (Kerry would know...) and then inserted a thermostat for a reptile box into it.

IMG_8036.thumb.JPG.b52f2a7318812124adac408d463dc940.JPG

 

 I then lined it with heat tape that is hooked up to the thermostat.  While not made for chocolates, reptiles and chocolates seem to have the same constant gentle heat requirements.   By messing with the container size and pan size, I was able to make a double decker container, and I keep the opaque on top, and the transparent and ones made with organic coloring (which don't play nicely with the airbrush) on the bottom.  The photo below is the bottom layer and the heat tape is on both bottom and sides.

IMG_8038.thumb.JPG.6753f474e9faff45e4077581fd8572a4.JPG

 

Here is the top layer.  As you can see, it holds quite a few 4 oz glass containers.  All in all it can hold about 55 jars.  There is more room on top than on bottom due to the nature of the cambro and the hardware on the inside.  

 

IMG_8037.thumb.JPG.95948fce8df10da3207cfa8008fdd584.JPG  

 

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2 hours ago, VistaGardens said:

The box isn't "hard" to make, but it does have a few steps.  The short version is that I took a cambro and cut a hole in it using a special saw like they use to cut casts off of arms and legs (Kerry would know...) and then inserted a thermostat for a reptile box into it.


A Herpstat and Flexwatt… do you work with reptiles? Herpstats are amazing controllers. Most of them are a bit pricey for a cocoa butter warmer but the Intro that you're using is pretty reasonable. I'm running a Herpstat 2 on each of my enclosures controlling a radiant heat panel up top and a UTH underneath and I've had zero issues with them. I have some less expensive controllers that I used to use for enclosures with less temp-reliant species that I'm going to play around with and see if they're precise enough for cocoa butter purposes.
 

1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

@VistaGardens, thanks for posting that. It is very impressive, but unfortunately well beyond my skills.


Not trying to convince you to do it but just for the record, I'm willing to say it isn't beyond your skills and I don't even know you outside of here. That stuff is marketed to the reptile hobbyist/enthusiast and is very user-friendly to work with.

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On 8/13/2018 at 12:13 PM, Jim D. said:

@VistaGardens, thanks for posting that. It is very impressive, but unfortunately well beyond my skills.

Yes, herpstat and flexwatt tape.  Perhaps this would be a good workshop for the conference in St. Louis? Making colored CB and the box.  We could place a mass order ahead of time and perhaps get a discount.

 Kerry has to bring her saw...

 

 As for the cost, the herpstat was the most expensive part, but it works well with the granularity and control that is needed for chocolate.  I picked up the cambro from Craigslist.  living in los angeles, it seems that whatever I want finally comes around on CL!  So I'd guess all in all it was about $300 or less, not including the glass jars.  I keep it on all the time except during vacation, and it doesn't eat up much electric, and it doesn't heat the chocolate room up, because of the cambro.  throws off less heat than the Mol d'arts.

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I just thought I’d throw out there in case anyone was interested that Andrey will be teaching a spray boot camp with Melissa at Melissa Coppel’s studio in LV January 12-15 and then a second class called “Colorful Chocolates” January 17-18 of next year. Melissa just emailed me next year’s class schedule. 

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7 hours ago, Pastrypastmidnight said:

I just thought I’d throw out there in case anyone was interested that Andrey will be teaching a spray boot camp with Melissa at Melissa Coppel’s studio in LV January 12-15 and then a second class called “Colorful Chocolates” January 17-18 of next year. Melissa just emailed me next year’s class schedule. 

Get thee behind me Satan!

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What else is happening in 2019? I've never been to Vegas, only NYC. Maybe I should go for something. :) 

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