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Mjx

Omnivores, what are your favorite vegan dishes?

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Thanks! These are great, so many are ideas I'd not thought of, or forgotten; I tend to make the same familiar things repeatedly for myself, which was one of the things that worried me, in terms of producing something interesting. I'm really looking forward to discussing these with my friend :)

 

14 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

...

Is this a sit-down dinner (plated or family style), buffet, finger-food? 

 

This will be a buffet (last I heard), although not finger food. So everyone will be able to (and almost cetainly will, even if just sort of automatically) help themselves to the vegan dishes, which means making enough for the whole crowd.

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I love to accommodate guests' special requests or preferences.  @Mjx you are right, it is so easy to fall back on the same items over and again

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Posted (edited)

The Smoky Incan Stew recipe at this webpage is good.   https://www.goodfood.com.au/recipes/vegan-recipes-from-isa-chandra-moskowitz-20140326-35igg

 

 It's from Isa Chandra Moskowitz's vegan cookbook Isa Does It.  She's reliable for vegan recipes.

 

I also like veganized Indian food.  Vegan Richa(Richa Hingle)is a dependable source for that.  Here's the Indian section of her website if you want to browse it and see if anything there appeals to you.   https://www.veganricha.com/category/indian-vegan-recipes

 

Vegan Richa's Indian Kitchen Is a nice cookbook.

 

I own both cookbooks I mentioned in this post and can recommend both.  They're a couple of my favorites out of the twenty or so vegan cookbooks I have.

 


Edited by Chimayo Joe typo (log)
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I love vegan cooking and try to do two to  four vegan dishes a week. I'm a huge fan of Vegan Black Metal Chef, Thug Kitchen, and Post Punk Kitchen/Isa Moskowitz. Vegan Black Metal Chef's vegan sush  and his matzo ball soup are favourites of mine (look on his youtube channel- his videos are hilarious but he also does know his stuff= hois Indian Feast of the Gods video is another fave) . Isa Moskowitz's pizza recipes are pretty much my go-to these days, and I love her stewed tofu in miso gravy

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Nobody's mentioned yet the classic 3-bean (or 4, 5, 7, whatever) salad. Mix cooked beans of your choice - for example, kidney beans, butter beans and yellow wax beans (the classic combo on this side of the pond) with a nice tart vinaigrette. This is verry flexible as to the type and quantity of beans and the other additions. Add or omit finely chopped onion, garlic, herbs, mushrooms, tomatoes if you can find them.

 

This salad is typically a summertime salad in the States, but I can't think why it would be unacceptable as a warm dish.

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18 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Nobody's mentioned yet the classic 3-bean (or 4, 5, 7, whatever) salad. Mix cooked beans of your choice - for example, kidney beans, butter beans and yellow wax beans (the classic combo on this side of the pond) with a nice tart vinaigrette. This is verry flexible as to the type and quantity of beans and the other additions. Add or omit finely chopped onion, garlic, herbs, mushrooms, tomatoes if you can find them.

 

This salad is typically a summertime salad in the States, but I can't think why it would be unacceptable as a warm dish.

Does this take me back.  Got the recipe from CaliPoutine many years ago and she got it from her ex-M-i-L.  Serve it each year at our annual Dog Weekend.    You can make it days or even weeks ahead of serving.  

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While we're on that bean salad kick...one of my summer favorites has always been cooked, drained and rinsed black beans; fresh corn kernels, cooked just a little; red onion, quartered, sliced, and soaked in ice water for 30 minutes, then drained and patted dry; chunked avocado; chunked, drained tomatoes or halved cherry tomatoes. Dressing of lime juice, a neutral oil, and smoked paprika. Love it with any kind of grilled meat, or just by itself with a side of tortilla chips.

 

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On 4/26/2018 at 1:52 AM, Chimayo Joe said:

I also like veganized Indian food.  Vegan Richa(Richa Hingle)is a dependable source for that.  Here's the Indian section of her website if you want to browse it and see if anything there appeals to you.   https://www.veganricha.com/category/indian-vegan-recipes

 

Vegan Richa's Indian Kitchen Is a nice cookbook.

 

I own both cookbooks I mentioned in this post and can recommend both.  They're a couple of my favorites out of the twenty or so vegan cookbooks I have.

 

 

Many Indian vegetable dishes are already vegan or can be easily made so. That's my go-to if I have vegans to feed: cauliflower curry, green bean curry, mixed veggies, the addition of chard or other greens to a dish, etc. Curry leaves if you can get 'em. Using some tomatoes as a part of the broth is great--fresh in season or canned Italian tomatoes in winter. With a tomato based broth a little coconut milk is nice too. Serve with chutneys (easy to make vegan, and some vegan ones are easy to buy as well),  cut apples or fresh pineapple other fruit. And have raita on the side for non-vegans. 

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22 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

Many Indian vegetable dishes are already vegan or can be easily made so. That's my go-to if I have vegans to feed ...

 

Me too. I've rarely met a vegan Indian dish I didn't like. My luck's been much worse with California-style vegan restaurants and cookbooks, where it sometimes seems the chefs don't have any roots in food that tastes good.

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Here's another one I forgot about until I found some in the fridge; because of the high preponderance of vinegar in it, it keeps forever.

 

Lightly blanched asparagus, cut in one-inch chunks

Raw sugar snap peas, cut in 1/3 inch slices crossways

Whatever other raw thing you want to throw in; I have added slivered carrot, and cauliflower florets cut up small. Should not be a watery vegetable.

 

Dressing: 2:1 some sort of relatively light vinegar (white wine, distilled white, etc.) and sugar, heated until sugar dissolves and poured over veggies while hot.

 

You can add whatever herbs float your boat. I will sometimes throw in fresh tarragon, but I love just the crispness of the vinegar with the crunch of the veggies. You can also adjust the sugar to your liking.

 

 

 

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I have a couple of tofu and noodle dishes that I love and make regularly: 

I used to not be a big tofu fan but these dishes helped convert me. 

 

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If I were just eating it and not cooking it, I think Fucha Ryouri (Fucha Buddhist Temple Cooking) is always interesting - so much care given to mouthfeel. But possibly too rich for every day.

Generally, I think it is the techniques as much as the individual recipes that inspire: the combination of nuts/seeds with bitter greens; the use of thickeners to allow delicate flavors to linger; the physical layering of flavors in mildly fermented pickles; the use of agar gels with sauces to separate interesting flavors...

I really hope this thread continues, because I think it will have a slow burn - so many people don't divide their worlds into vegan or non-vegan that it may take a while to come up with the goods.

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For the record, for those who want to delve in to it a bit deeper, try making your own seitan- it's ridiculously cheap to do so and you can customize the flavours much easier.

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