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Dinner Rush, the movie


Rosie
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I wanted to like Dinner Rush,but found it to be a mob wannabe,cliche ridden,badly written movie,with one of the most annoying musical scores in memory.Nice cinematography,fairly realistic restaurant scenes-but not a good movie.

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I finally saw it and felt it was worth the wait. I especially liked the concept of Chris "in the morning" Stevens (no relation) from Northern Exposure as a Fuller Brush Salesman. :shock:

Edited for suspense.

Edited by =Mark (log)

=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

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Mark, that may be a bit of a spoiler for those who haven't seen the movie, do you want to edit it? (Only a suggestion).

Cool, since I'm renting it this weekend I'll just forget about that part.

:hmmm:

...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

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Hi

Have you all seen Tampopo? That is a terrific foodie movie. I was practically drooling 20 min into it...

Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.

-- William Grimes

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My video store didn't have Dinner Rush last time I looked, but I'll try again, maybe Saturday if I get all the prep work for my Groundhogs day brunch done in time.

Have you seen Vatel? I loved that movie. It was such a great story and if you are a true foodie you will love seeing all the garde manger work that he does. The carved vegetable flowers, salt sculpture, ice carvings. Really magnificent.

"Never eat more than you can lift" -- Miss Piggy

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My wife and I watched it last night, and enjoyed the hell out of it. I thought the characters were very colorfully written, and it was well shot.

Thanks for the tip!

Steve

Edited by steverino (log)

"Tell your friends all around the world, ain't no companion like a blue - eyed merle" Robert Plant

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I just watched Dinner Rush last night. I'm with those who thought it was a pretty good movie. It was one part conventional mob storyline and 2 parts of Bourdain's vision of what happens behind the scenes in a restaurant. What startled me most was the characterization of the people who flock to star chefs and trendy eateries as being snobs, assholes and otherwise venal to the nth degree. Nice touch. And let me add that the movie scores very big on the eye candy scale.

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Hi

Have you all seen Tampopo? That is a terrific foodie movie. I was practically drooling 20 min into it...

Loved Tampopo. Now that's a *great* movie. You'll never eat ramen again without occasionally thinking of that movie.

Sadly, Dinner Rush may not have the same effect on me.

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I wanted to like Dinner Rush,but found it to be a mob wannabe,cliche ridden,badly written movie,with one of the most annoying musical scores in memory.Nice cinematography,fairly realistic restaurant scenes-but not a good movie.

I thought it was a really good movie and I enjoyed every bad line and cliche. I really liked the pace and the cinematography. After the first few scenes, the whole movie occurs almost in real time. I also liked the opening with the steady stream of menu items being spoken as the camera came in and out of the dining room and kitchen of the restaurant. I think it helps not only to love food, but to have some reservations or suspicions about everyone else's love of food. Some latent animosity towards hangers on in the art world helps as well perhaps.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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  • 4 months later...
  • 10 months later...

Thought I'd resurrect this one - just caught this last night showing on satellite.

It was a surprisingly good film, I liked the kitchen scenes, and there was a good twist at the end.

Wasn't sure about the special lobster creation though, as I remembr it lobster stacked up against some deep fried pasta, with champagne sauce flavoured with lime, served with caviar and wasabi flavoured tobiko roe?

Sounded fairly nasty to me, and looked pretty dumb too. Probably terms out to be someones famous signature dish, but lost on me! And I know it was meant to be more avant garde italian, but what was wasabi flavoured tobiko even doing in the kitchen!

Other slight gripe, how impressed would a food writer really be if they were given things completely off menu? I'd be thinking, well that was good, but what are you serving everyone else?

Still, highly recommended though.

I love animals.

They are delicious.

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I saw the movie a while ago. I thought it would be better, but it was entertaining enough.

The one to see now (on DVD) is Mostly Martha.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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Wasn't sure about the special lobster creation though, as I remembr it lobster stacked up against some deep fried pasta, with champagne sauce flavoured with lime, served with caviar and wasabi flavoured tobiko roe?

Sounded fairly nasty to me, and looked pretty dumb too. Probably terms out to be someones famous signature dish, but lost on me! And I know it was meant to be more avant garde italian, but what was wasabi flavoured tobiko even doing in the kitchen!

Other slight gripe, how impressed would a food writer really be if they were given things completely off menu? I'd be thinking, well that was good, but what are you serving everyone else?

I think that was the point--restaurant critic as self absorbed and unprofessional bitch only intent on getting served and serviced like the star she thinks she is. It looked like the kind of dish that might be right up her alley. Having what others can't have is what gets her out of bed in the morning and in bed at night. I don't know anyone exactly like that and I'll bet that at best (or worst?) it's a composite of a few people's worst traits and they may not all be restaurant critics. I thought it was an over the top character, but maybe some chef knows the real life version. There were a few over the top characters in the film, but as I've know a few of their type, maybe the rest exist in real life as well.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Dinner Rush is available through netflix. I just ordered it. (a service I cannot reccomend highly enough, as it pays for itself several times over each month in late fees that I don't pay anymore at the video store).

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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