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Goat


heidih
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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

The farmer who sells at some of the local farmers markets around here offers a range of conventional cuts of goat so it would seem that it can be done:  Jimenez Family Farm goat

I am sure it can be done. I am just not sure that it is profitable to do it unless you can reach a niche market who can afford to pay for the labour needed. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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On 7/14/2021 at 5:41 AM, Anna N said:

That’s very interesting. I don’t know a thing about goat anatomy but they don’t look like they carry a whole lot of flesh on their bones. So I wonder if the butchery performed on pigs and cows etc. makes little sense with goats. 

Makes more sense to compare goat to lamb.

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22 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

The farmer who sells at some of the local farmers markets around here offers a range of conventional cuts of goat so it would seem that it can be done:  Jimenez Family Farm goat

The link is instructive.    Note that prices for properly (i.e., American style) butchered goat is comparable to prime lamb, as it should be.

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11 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

The link is instructive.    Note that prices for properly (i.e., American style) butchered goat is comparable to prime lamb, as it should be.

 

What makes you think American style butchery is "proper", as opposed to any other kind? Billions of people around the world will disagree, especially those for whom eating goat is a regular occurence.

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It all depends on what the goal is. If the goal is to hack an animal up and simmer it for half a day, it can be proper to hammer it with a machete into tiny bits (or, less rustically, use a bandsaw or whatever to do the same thing). If the goal is to cook each part of the animal in ways that are tailored to that specific part of the animal, a more nuanced and time-consuming (and skilled) approach to butchery is proper. I wouldn't ruin goat chops by stewing them forever, and I wouldn't try to grill goat cube mystery bits. At any rate, neither style of butchered meat is "proper" without respect to a culinary purpose. But there is a difference in the amount of skill required to produce them.

Earlier in the thread, I referred to the "cube it up" approach as "artless butchery." I'd stand by that. I wouldn't say it's improper. I wouldn't even say that it's bad or less desirable. It all depends on what you're trying to do with it. But given my preferences and eating experiences, I don't care for that style of goat. I'd actually probably like it more if the dishes I'd tried used larger pieces of of goat instead of the small cubes that all the Indian, west African and Jamaican places I've been to seem to use. On these, the meat to bone ratio is dismal, which wouldn't be a problem on a larger bone. I don't mind boney spare ribs, for example, because even though there's a lot of bone relative to meat, it is easy and satisfying to gnaw off. I find the tiny cubes tedious and annoying; I don't enjoying having to have my "mouth radar" on all the time while dining. Again, these are statements of personal preference. YMMV.

I bet the goat cubes are great for making stock. 

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@liuzhou, Proper by American butchering style.   Billions of people eat goat cut as their respective cultures dictate.    The expensive goat in the  linked article is broken down in the American style which produces/provides totally different cuts.  

The operative word was "price" and the context was comparing the price of a particularly butchered goat to similarly butchered lamb.     

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

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