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We are trying to acquire the above kind of cooking wok for our bulk cooking requirements where large quantities of broths being made or curries or sauces.

 

There is a planetary rotation shaft which mixes the food at a tunable rpm. And there are gas burners at the bottom of the wok.

 

The vendors often asks what kind of viscosity the food has and what type of foods being made?

 

How this viscosity related to this cooking wok equipment?

 

Is this factor a critical one while considering this kind of wok?

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They're questions for the manufacturer.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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The viscosity will determine if the motor is powerful enough to work for you. This is a bit like when makers of small, home-style mixers state that they are not designed for making bread dough. There's a big difference between mixing watery liquids and, say, making mashed potatoes. Be honest and decribe the types of foods you will be making.

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As Lisa says, the thicker the viscosity, the more powerful the motor needs to be.  Viscosity is usually measured by pouring an amount of fluid, at a set temperature, into a container of a certain size, with a specific sized hole on the bottom, and timing how long it takes to empty the container.   The container is often called a viscosity or flow cup, and there are numerous different sizes depending on the type of fluid being measured.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_cups     Ask the vendor if there is a particular measuring device that should be used to measure the viscosity of what you are making to be sure it fits within their specs.  

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