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pastrygirl

mol d' art melter power cord

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Has anyone successfully replaced the power cord on a mol d' art melter?  Is it easy or do I have to send it somewhere, and if so, where?  Thought I'd check here for DIY info before contacting TCF.

 

My 6kg melter has reached the point where the cord has to be in that just right position to conduct power, and just right can be elusive.  I've had it for several years so it's seen some use, am hoping it's a simple repair, i.e. can be done with a screwdriver or passed off to one of my handier brothers in exchange for candy.

 

thanks!

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I've got a very handy husband - I'd just hand it over to him and several months later it would come back out of his shop repaired. Does your Mold'art have screws on the bottom that allow you to take it apart? If it does - it should be a quick fix. If rewiring is not something you have done before I might hand it off to the handy brother. 

 

Does the loose wire seem to be at the plug end or the machine end?

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Several months later.  Lol @Kerry Beal  Quality cannot be rushed. 

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Just now, gfweb said:

Several months later.  Lol @Kerry Beal  Quality cannot be rushed. 

Yeah - don't ask how long the basement has taken so far! You can't rush these things. 

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7 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

@Kerry Beal  loose at the machine end.  I think the bottom unscrews, didn't actually look! 

Might just be a loose wire and quick fix. Watch for any sign there has been shorting.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I've got a very handy husband - I'd just hand it over to him and several months later it would come back out of his shop repaired.

 

So if I send it to your husband can he do a rush order and have it back by October for busy season? xD

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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

 

So if I send it to your husband can he do a rush order and have it back by October for busy season? xD

LOL - that's true! If you send it to me I'll have it done the same day.

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Posted (edited)

So it’s a nut & bolt type situation, but the bolt head has a round hole.   What tool does one use to hold that in place while disengaging the nut?

Otherwise they turn together. 

73695184-011A-48BD-AE30-EC6BDDBEB7BB.thumb.jpeg.9f633c593d7c9cb6b73d2084c1e3cf87.jpeg632ECECA-9D96-4C4A-808E-907196E975EF.thumb.jpeg.b6f600262f6d520e351ed4c6b93d2e4d.jpeg


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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I think that a socket wrench of the right size will handle that - may not need anything to hold the other side. It will be metric because it's from Belgium.

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It looks like you will need a set of metric hex keys for the screw with the hex shaped indentation...  Metric keys are a little hard to find in the US, but I've seen sets bundled with Imperial measures at the Home Depot.  You can either hold the nut with a socket wrench, nut driver, or even a pair of pliers.

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Good eye on spotting the indentation, @KennethT . I was seeing that as a little protrusion (nub) and wondering if it was like a carriage bolt. @pastrygirl, I think most hardware stores will carry metric hex keys - by the way, they're also called Allen wrenches. You can also try a local bicycle shop, if that's closer to your location.

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Yes, it’s an innie, not outie, and flush with the surface so there’s nothing to grab. It really looks round, but I’ll see if I can find a tiny hex key that will work. 

 

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Ok, with a little determination, I got the bottom off.  No signs of smoke or anything, it's just that the wires have broken where the cord enters the machine, weakened from being bent back and forth.

 

Video on You Tube says cut out the bad part, strip the wires a bit, twist together, making sure it's the same side (one half of cord is grooved, one is smooth), wrap with electrical tape.  Sounds easy enough, right?  I went to college, now I just need wire strippers and electrical tape.  No husband required! 

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Great!  Rather than just twisting with electrical tape, I would rather use wire nuts - they're self insulating and make a better connection than just twisting wires together.  (Actually, personally, I would use a crimped connector, but that's just because I have access to them and the appropriate crimping tool - but the wire nuts would work fine). BTW, if you don't want to purchase wire strippers, in a pinch, I have used a knife - just be careful not to nick or cut any of the stranded wires

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I've got the best wire strippers! Many fewer cuts than using a scalpel. 

 

Agree with the Marrette connectors - they make life so simple!

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Thanks for the tip on the wire connectors - 48 cents, one small blister (from getting those cursed screws apart), and a little help from my friends later, and the melter powers up fine again. Hooray!  

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

Thanks for the tip on the wire connectors - 48 cents, one small blister (from getting those cursed screws apart), and a little help from my friends later, and the melter powers up fine again. Hooray!  

 

 

 

There is something supremely satisfying about accomplishing something like this!

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It can also be supremely frustrating - a couple months ago, I got a vertical rotisserie... after 2 uses, it died... the autopsy revealed that the design was really stupid - the spit motor is located directly under the spit, so as you're roasting away, some grease or juices runs down the shaft and gets into the motor.  Just as I discovered this issue, the 30 day Amazon return expired...  I've been trying to find replacement motors - I've looked everywhere - I can find many similar motors with the similar speed, the same mounting, but the end of the shaft shape (where the spit plugs in) is wrong so I'd either have to remachine the spit or the motor shaft...

 

It's a shame because the heating elements and reflector work great.  Making a new spit myself, or redesigning how the motor interfaces with it may wind up costing more than the rotisserie did!

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7 hours ago, KennethT said:

It can also be supremely frustrating - a couple months ago, I got a vertical rotisserie... after 2 uses, it died... the autopsy revealed that the design was really stupid - the spit motor is located directly under the spit, so as you're roasting away, some grease or juices runs down the shaft and gets into the motor.


I really want to ask if you're sure you weren't using it upside down... but not because I actually think you were, just because I'm a bit of a smartass. :D

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Ha!! Here's a pic looking at the bottom of the machine...

20180331_165828.thumb.jpg.82ec6d00105f6658b0c83bfd620ccbdb.jpg

It can only go one way!

 

Here's it in action

20180121_185828.thumb.jpg.228c3f526b5470f1dfc5c1a01d5b3e10.jpg

You can't see the motor but the bottom of the spit looks like a flathead screwdriver and the motors shaft has a slot to accept it. Notice the chicjen grease on the spit - I expected it to run off onto the drip pan, but some just ran along the underside and down the shaft into the motor... unbeknownst to me at the time!

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