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DanM

Smoked Beef

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One of the surprises from our move to Switzerland is the availability of kosher charcuterie. Sausages of all types, confit, mousse, rietttes, etc... One of the recent finds is this block of smoked beef. It has a nice fat layer in the middle. Any thoughts on how to use it? Should I slice it thin and then fry?

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.


Edited by DanM (log)

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Here is a picture of the piece I bought. The package simply says Boeuf fumé from Buchinger.

Smoked beef.jpg

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"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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I think I'd treat it like proscuitto. Just slice and eat.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

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51 minutes ago, FeChef said:

I think i would treat it as bacon.

That was my first thought.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Looks good enough to slice and eat.  Add some to a sauce or dropped on to pizza.

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It was not edible raw... too tough and the fat layer was unpleasant.

 

On 4/5/2018 at 8:40 PM, gfweb said:

Looks like they suggest a braise http://buchinger.fr/product.php?id_product=113

 

I was planning on braising a turkey roll for dinner in a stew of random veg, canned tomatoes, wine, and herbs. I pulled out a little into a small pan and braised this chunk of cow... It was perfect if not just a little over done after an hour. 


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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