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Doofa

@Nathan on BBC Radio 4.

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FYI. On todays Food Programme, BBC Radio 4 which will be podcasted I think tomorrow after its repeat. He outlined the Bread tome, and I found very interesting the economics of bread. It's all a bit beyond me as a Coeliac most of it is out of my reach. One can listen to it on Radio 4 website. Furthermore R4 is my constant companion and the last bastion of civilisation

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I got really excited when they introduced Nathan Myhrvold on the radio but I was driving with my chatty buddy, so I look forward to listening again. I didn't really know anything about Nathan. Quite a guy, isn't he?

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Indeed he is. Make sure you listen again it's a worthwhile discussion. D

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6 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Did you mean @nathanm?

Yes sorry you have identified him correctly. Enjoy. D

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