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Trufflenaut

Where to find vegan confectioner's glaze in small quantities?

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Does anyone know of a source for a vegan confectioner's glaze suitable for sugar/chocolate panning (for sealing the candies from the Evils of the Outside World)?  I have a couple of friends who are vegan or vegetarian, and I'd like to avoid being a total jerk if I can help it ("Look at these tasty treats I made THAT YOU CAN'T EAT!!  MWAHAHA!!").  I need small quantities, as this is just for occasional home use.

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Glaze is only for shine, right?  I've only panned a few chocolate items and left them un-shiny, dusted with cocoa powder, powdered sugar, or even a little decor powder aka luster dust.  So maybe something that adds flavor or color instead of shine?

 

Do you always use vegan sugar for these friends?  If the bone char doesn't bother them maybe they'll also be able to overlook a tiny little bit of bug secretion and enjoy those tasty treats you worked so hard on.  (which is up to them to decide after full disclosure, of course)

 

 


Edited by pastrygirl disclosure (log)

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My main goal with using the glaze is blocking humidity from affecting soft-sugar-panned candies.  For chocolate-panned candies, I'm looking mainly for the shininess for when I want to make things a little prettier (and I'm assuming the glaze would be a very slight help in preventing chocolate from rubbing off onto anything the candies touch) - the dusting options you suggested are good, but not what I'm looking for in this case (though it did give me some ideas for fun I could have with luster dust for the next time I'm feeling artistic).

 

I actually wasn't aware of the bone char thing *whistles innocently* (and apparently my friends are also unaware, or don't care), but bugs are probably a deal-breaker.  Apparently there's a confectioner's glaze made from zein (corn protein), which I found a manufacturer for, but I was hoping someone might have a source that sells small quantities (I'm still working on a good list of suppliers for everything I need).

 

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@Trufflenaut, when you are panning, are you using a polish, then glaze? I'd love to see what you have panned thus far. This is my really the best thing I could come up with. I'm not sure if I posted this email in one of the other threads, but it certainly applies here. When I first got into panning, I had trouble find a polishing solution, where as finding a glaze was easy. This is an email from a rep at TIC Gums. I was asking for a sample, but he gave me this instead.

-------------

If you are looking for a very high gloss coating, your best bet would be to look for a supplier of shellac, but if you are looking for a non-animal alternative you can certainly evaluate gum acacia. In this process, you should make up a solution of sealing syrup comprised of 40% gum acacia in water. To prepare the solution:

1.       Add 40 parts gum acacia to 60 parts water.

2.       Heat up to 80°C to ensure the acacia is fully hydrated.

3.       Maintain a temperature between 25-60°C while applying.

For the application process, using the 40% gum acacia syrup, add a charge of ~1 part syrup per 100 parts dragee (by weight) to provide a protective film. Dry with air. Repeat this step two more times. This coating will have some shine, but not quite as much as a shellac will.

-------------

This actually has been more useful then I thought it was in the beginning. When polishing dragees, I do use this solution, it works. Like he says, it does give a shine, not as shiny as the confectioners glaze will attain, and not with the same protective qualities as a glaze, but really, it may work fine for what you need, especially with the dietary restrictions of your friends. Additionally, the gum acacia (arabic) is easy to source.

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@minas6907: that’s really helpful, thanks.  I had heard about gum acacia as a final coat, but also read that it didn’t do very well as a moisture barrier (but that was from an industry book, so they have different standards than I do).   From what you’re saying, I should do fine with it, so I’ll give it a shot.  

 

I’m right now just at the very beginning of learning how to pan, and have huge piles of learning to do - my first introduction to panning of any kind was when I finished building my panner and fired it up the weekend before last :)  

 

So far I’ve made chocolate covered coffee beans:

955E32F8-1C99-42C4-A6D0-DC75928D1FE4.thumb.jpeg.8444fe962c318b851042b9224a9010dc.jpeg

 

...and dried bluberries soft-panned with lemon flavor (from which I learned I need to seal the blueberries first so the juice doesn’t make the yellow shell greenish :P ):

73051D33-4C87-49BE-80FF-F956397DE523.thumb.jpeg.70fda544cdd2a7551e25029845dcd888.jpeg

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