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Tropicalsenior

What do you do when you can't stand the heat but can't get out of the kitchen?

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This probably sounds like a strange subject to bring up when most of you, as @CantCookStillTry would say, are up to your knickers in snow and ice  but some of us right now are in a heat wave. Although Costa Rica is in the northern hemisphere, Central America only has two seasons. Wet and dry. Wet season is from sometime in April to sometime in November so that puts us in the dry season right now and our two hottest months are March and April. CCST is in Australia and going through a real hot time. We'd like to know what you do to beat the heat.  What are your favorite hot weather recipes? How do you cook in the hot weather to keep from heating up your kitchen? Any and all suggestions and anecdotes are welcome.

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I have never understood folks who do all of their cooking outside in hot weather.  The last thing that I want to do when it it 90+ degrees is step one foot outdoors, much less stand over a grill.  I just crank the AC and try to do things that won't require long oven cooking - stovetop, slow cooker and large toaster oven food.

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Salad, salad, and more salad. All kinds of salads. 

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I second @Kim Shook - when it's hot, I do a lot of stovetop stuff, or really, anything that doesn't require the oven.  Plus, when it's hot, I like to make spicy food that makes you sweat and tastes good and a warm room temp.... so that's pretty much anything SE Asian.  Also, I don't know if you have the capability, but sous vide is a great way to keep the kitchen cool, and I'll do that as well.

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I use my CSO and my instant pot a lot because neither heats up the house much. I'll do things like roast a chicken or cook a beef roast, that I can eat on for several days. Lots of salads, marinated veggies, fruit. Lots of cheese and charcuterie plates.  

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Like Kaye, I use  my IP, CSO, other pressure cookers plus I sometimes will deep-fry or grill out on the deck.

i make more salads when it's hot as well.

on my trip to Costa Rica a few years ago, in early January it was still much too hot for me.  Fortunately, the condos we stayed in had AC.  I can't stand the heat here in the summer!  AC is essential to my comfort.

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Popsicles!  xD

 

When it's really hot, I don't have much of an appetite and am happy to eat fresh fruits and vegetables - cut up or not, in smoothies, salads and ....yes....popsicles! 

 

Edited to add that I remember visiting Venezuela for a scientific meeting some years ago. It was very warm and humid and I believe I subsisted on the hotel's platos de frutas,  three meals/day for most of the week!


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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7 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

... We'd like to know what you do to beat the heat.  What are your favorite hot weather recipes? How do you cook in the hot weather to keep from heating up your kitchen? ...

 

We have a pool! Great way to cool off! Our favorites are those cooked on the grill! I have been using my Instant Pot and Anova to great advantage, not only in less time spent “watching the pot”, but in less heat in the kitchen. We do have air conditioning, which runs more than half of the year given our warm and humid weather.

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What's the matter with you guys?

When it's too hot in the kitchen, go naked! :D

 

Or a small electric fan will take care the heat effectively.

 

dcarch

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8 minutes ago, dcarch said:

What's the matter with you guys?

When it's too hot in the kitchen, go naked! :D

 

Or a small electric fan will take care the heat effectively.

 

dcarch

I tried that once.  A baked chicken literally got out of the pot and ran when it saw me.

1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

 

I'd freeze at your place.9_9

My mom brings sweatshirts when she visits in the summer lol.

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11 minutes ago, dcarch said:

What's the matter with you guys?

When it's too hot in the kitchen, go naked! :D

 

Or a small electric fan will take care the heat effectively.

 

dcarch

1 word... SPLATTER!!!

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Here in South Florida, I do have air conditioning but it can be crazy expensive and it freezes solid if it gets overused in high heat and humidity. Sad to say, when the heat's really killing me, the kitchen appliance I use most is the telephone, to make reservations or order delivery.

 

(On the other hand, it's a balmy 75 out now and I just came in from the pool, so for February I'm not complaining.)

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8 minutes ago, munchymom said:

Here in South Florida, I do have air conditioning but it can be crazy expensive and it freezes solid if it gets overused in high heat and humidity. Sad to say, when the heat's really killing me, the kitchen appliance I use most is the telephone, to make reservations or order delivery.

 

(On the other hand, it's a balmy 75 out now and I just came in from the pool, so for February I'm not complaining.)

 Love it!

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The popularity of stainless steel kitchen finishes is not helping.

According to the physics law of radiation, reflective surfaces reflects heat back to you.

Just like a thermos bottle, it has mirror interior finish.

 

dcarch

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1 hour ago, Beebs said:

Cold beer.

 

With you, sister.

 

2 hours ago, dcarch said:

What's the matter with you guys?

When it's too hot in the kitchen, go naked! :D

 

Or a small electric fan will take care the heat effectively.

 

dcarch

 

To quote a former co-worker, "There's just some stuff that ought to be covered up."

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, kayb said:

To quote a former co-worker, "There's just some stuff that ought to be covered up."

 

Very true. As KennthT has warned. Covering up the pot will prevent splatter injuries. :-)

 

dcarch

 

 


Edited by dcarch (log)
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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

1 word... SPLATTER!!!

 

I have been known to cook naked - except for the apron I wear to protect myself from splatters and such. Ah the blessings of being an empty-nester.

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Turn up the AC!  I am happiest if it's hot outside and cold inside...65f is just right 

Sous vide makes no heat. 

Gin and diet tonic with ice or really cold beer. 

 

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

Back to food ;)  I lean on composed salads and sweat-inducing SE Asian dishes as previously mentioned. The next really hot day will feature Kenji's shiritaki one  https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/02/shirataki-noodle-salad-cucumber-sesame-sichuan-chili-vinegar-vegan-recipe.html

 

 

Have you made this before?  It looks intriguing.

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No have not made it but think about it when it gets hot (37 degrees at 5am this morn so not yet....)  I really like those noodles - not just for the low clories. Staple for me in warm dishes so this is stuck in my "to do" brain. 

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Posted (edited)

Here in the tropics, the temps rarely drop below 23ºC/73ºF apart from about a month (usually February, but earlier this year). Today is 23ºC.  In July -August we are looking at between 35ºC and 40ºC / 95ºF and 104ºF.

 

Thanks to stir frying, we survive. OK. stir-frying in wok is high temperature, but only for minutes at most. Salads are rare in Chinese cuisine.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Ok I have been taking notes, I'm going to cook spicey food naked, in an apron, occasionally outside, with a splash guard over a wok and serve side salad. 

 

Jeez. We usually have a weekly visit from the (lovely) J Witness group with the latest pamphlets. They might not want to come see me no more! 

 

Jokes aside I am finding all input very helpful. Thanks for starting the topic TropicalS. 

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Posted (edited)

When I'm cooking, all I wear is loose cotton scrub tops and white shorts about two sizes too big. I do mean, that's ALL I wear. I can't stand anything tight. I keep a big supply in the laundry room and if I get splattered or floured, I can change and keep right on going. It may not be the most attractive, but at my age I'm not trying to look cool, I'm just trying to stay cool.


Edited by Tropicalsenior Editing correction (log)
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