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pastrygirl

Valrhona Inspirations

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I had a chance to try a couple of Valrhona's new "inspirations" flavors today, the passion fruit and the almond.  The almond was good but I'd probably add salt.  The passion fruit is intense and delicious, I bet you could cut it with a sweeter white chocolate and still get good flavor.  They also have strawberry.  These are cocoa-butter based so can be used for shell molding.  https://inter.valrhona.com/en/inspiration-valrhona-innovation

 

I could definitely see using these.  Passion fruit is one of my favorite flavors, and I already indulge in the convenience of Perfect Puree so I don't think this would compromise my integrity ;)  

 

Just wanted to share.  Available soon, probably expensive xD


Edited by Smithy Corrected title spelling (log)
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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

I had a chance to try a couple of Valrhona's new "inspirations" flavors today, the passion fruit and the almond.  The almond was good but I'd probably add salt.  The passion fruit is intense and delicious, I bet you could cut it with a sweeter white chocolate and still get good flavor.  They also have strawberry.  These are cocoa-butter based so can be used for shell molding.  https://inter.valrhona.com/en/inspiration-valrhona-innovation

 

I could definitely see using these.  Passion fruit is one of my favorite flavors, and I already indulge in the convenience of Perfect Puree so I don't think this would compromise my integrity ;)  

 

Just wanted to share.  Available soon, probably expensive xD

 

Leave it to you to be on the cutting edge! These sound intriguing. How did you get to taste them? I would certainly give them a try. At first thought, it seems a sacrilege--to work with flavored couverture seems like one of the dreaded "shortcuts" (like chocolate coating), but the more I think about it, it would open up possibilities to make a filling that works with (or contrasts to) the flavor of the shell. I think of a coconut ganache in a passion fruit shell.

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1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

How did you get to taste them?

 

Alex, our friendly West Coast Valrhona rep stopped by with another wholesale rep.  I've been buying Felchlin through Peterson, who has a warehouse here, but Albert Uster had taken on Felchlin last year.  I'm not sure if it was planned to have AUI be sole US supplier of Felchlin or if they are doing something else to push the competition out of the game, but when I placed my order today I found out Peterson was phasing out Felchlin and would be carrying more Valrhona instead.  So they were going around to all the Felchlin customers with suggestions on which Valrhona products would be the closest in flavor.  I have an account with AUI so I can still buy what I need, but I have been considering finding a less expensive milk chocolate than Maracaibo Creole.  Though Varhona is rarely the answer when it comes to increasing my profit margin xD

 

1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

At first thought, it seems a sacrilege--to work with flavored couverture seems like one of the dreaded "shortcuts" (like chocolate coating), but the more I think about it, it would open up possibilities to make a filling that works with (or contrasts to) the flavor of the shell. I think of a coconut ganache in a passion fruit shell.

 

Exactly.  I've been skeptical of the caramelia and the azalea as flavored chocolates, but these being fruit-based is more unique.  Also, I've been making a raspberry white chocolate with freeze dried raspberries (after seeing other chocolatiers like Soma make fruity bars), so I was excited that Valrhona was doing the same thing.  I've used my raspberry in decorative ways (like drizzled on a cookie) but haven't made shells out of it., it's too dear.  Once the fruit is powdered, is has very little volume and there is not much yield, so this might actually be more economical to buy. 

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I don't know the North American market, so I don't know if these are available there, but have you tried the double fermented couvertures? They are also really nice and $$$$$ but make for a beautiful ganache with that something extra.

Itakuja (double fermented with passion fruit pulp) is my favorite since I love anything with passion fruit.  When I first tasted it, I thought these cocoa beans were grown with with passion fruit vines growing amongst them!

Kidavoa (banana double fermented)  is also good, though I've only had a chance to taste the feves, and not work with it.

Mananka, madagascan cocoa beans fermented with citrus, I haven't tried but I've heard is the best of the three.

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Very expensive! Saw them in France last year and at FFS in San Fran in January.

 

Double fermented orange was one of my favorites ever. Never seen in North America.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

Leave it to you to be on the cutting edge! These sound intriguing. How did you get to taste them? I would certainly give them a try. At first thought, it seems a sacrilege--to work with flavored couverture seems like one of the dreaded "shortcuts" (like chocolate coating), but the more I think about it, it would open up possibilities to make a filling that works with (or contrasts to) the flavor of the shell. I think of a coconut ganache in a passion fruit shell.

It's not couverature though - there is no cocoa mass just fruit and cocoa butter.

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9 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

Alex, our friendly West Coast Valrhona rep stopped by with another wholesale rep.  I've been buying Felchlin through Peterson, who has a warehouse here, but Albert Uster had taken on Felchlin last year.  I'm not sure if it was planned to have AUI be sole US supplier of Felchlin or if they are doing something else to push the competition out of the game, but when I placed my order today I found out Peterson was phasing out Felchlin and would be carrying more Valrhona instead.  So they were going around to all the Felchlin customers with suggestions on which Valrhona products would be the closest in flavor.  I have an account with AUI so I can still buy what I need, but I have been considering finding a less expensive milk chocolate than Maracaibo Creole.  Though Varhona is rarely the answer when it comes to increasing my profit margin xD

...

Also, I've been making a raspberry white chocolate with freeze dried raspberries (after seeing other chocolatiers like Soma make fruity bars), so I was excited that Valrhona was doing the same thing.  I've used my raspberry in decorative ways (like drizzled on a cookie) but haven't made shells out of it., it's too dear.  Once the fruit is powdered, is has very little volume and there is not much yield, so this might actually be more economical to buy. 

I knew that AUI would become the sole distributor at the beginning of 2018. For me that was good news because they are located rather close to me, and if I buy enough at a time, they have free shipping. I wonder what strategy Felchlin has in mind with limiting distribution; it was always rather difficult to find. I would think the more distributors, the better for sales. I bought some Creole once but don't recall what it tasted like (it's less sweet than most milks, I think). I use the Maracaibo Criolait, but don't think it's less expensive. I gave up on the wonderful Fortunato milk as couverture (it's just too temperamental to make shells, though it is great in ganaches). You will certainly not cut your costs with Valrhona. By the way, I bought a Valrhona dark sampler once and found that their Caraïbe is the closest in flavor to Felchlin's Maracaibo dark (alas, it also shares Maracaibo's tendency to become overcrystallized rather quickly).

 

Could you give your source for the raspberries? The freeze dried fruit I have purchased (actually I think it was powdered) has been weak and "sawdusty" in flavor, though it was from a highly rated source.

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

It's not couverature though - there is no cocoa mass just fruit and cocoa butter.

So you don't use the term for white chocolate either? Valrhona calls the new product "fruit couvertures" and lists it as well as products like its Ivoire white under couverture. Perhaps they are using the term more loosely than you would?

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I guess if that's what they are calling them! I suppose since couverature has more cocoa butter than 'plain' chocolate it might loosely fit the definition.

 

It is pretty tasty stuff I must say.

 

 

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Are these new? Thought I saw them long ago. Hmm... 

 

I'm more interested in Ruby to be honest. Anyone here tried Ruby? Sorry if I go off topic here. :)

 

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Passionfruit is $86 for 3K. Mine is on order. Will be in mid March. Tried these at FFS in January. Absolutely love the passionfruit! 

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51 minutes ago, Rajala said:

Are these new? Thought I saw them long ago. Hmm... 

 

I'm more interested in Ruby to be honest. Anyone here tried Ruby? Sorry if I go off topic here. :)

 

 

They are not that new for us in Europe...Double ferments are newer. I know you are standing at the front of the queue for Ruby. :B

I find the double ferments and ruby a little more interesting simply because they work from the bean fermentation point to manipulate flavor and color, while  Valrhona inspirations is fruit purees added to cocoa butter and sugar.


Edited by julie99nl (log)

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1 hour ago, julie99nl said:

 

They are not that new for us in Europe...Double ferments are newer. I know you are standing at the front of the queue for Ruby. :B

I find the double ferments and ruby a little more interesting simply because they work from the bean fermentation point to manipulate flavor and color, while  Valrhona inspirations is fruit purees added to cocoa butter and sugar.

 

 

Haha! Yes, more info next week!!! :)

 

Didn't know that it was not available in the US until now.

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8 hours ago, Jim D. said:

So you don't use the term for white chocolate either? Valrhona calls the new product "fruit couvertures" and lists it as well as products like its Ivoire white under couverture. Perhaps they are using the term more loosely than you would?

 

If you go with the "more than 30% cocoa butter" definition, then couvertures can be white.  Or fruit.

 

Isn't the term meant to distinguish high quality, liquid chocolates suitable for molding and enrobing?

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45 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

If you go with the "more than 30% cocoa butter" definition, then couvertures can be white.  Or fruit.

 

Isn't the term meant to distinguish high quality, liquid chocolates suitable for molding and enrobing?

Definitions

 

I think by the Codex standards it would not fit - neither would white chocolate as couverture - but since the high percentage of cocoa butter makes them all so much easier to work with that we all tend to think of high fat chocolate as couverture regardless of colour. 

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10 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I knew that AUI would become the sole distributor at the beginning of 2018. For me that was good news because they are located rather close to me, and if I buy enough at a time, they have free shipping. I wonder what strategy Felchlin has in mind with limiting distribution; it was always rather difficult to find. I would think the more distributors, the better for sales. I bought some Creole once but don't recall what it tasted like (it's less sweet than most milks, I think). I use the Maracaibo Criolait, but don't think it's less expensive. I gave up on the wonderful Fortunato milk as couverture (it's just too temperamental to make shells, though it is great in ganaches). You will certainly not cut your costs with Valrhona. By the way, I bought a Valrhona dark sampler once and found that their Caraïbe is the closest in flavor to Felchlin's Maracaibo dark (alas, it also shares Maracaibo's tendency to become overcrystallized rather quickly).

 

Could you give your source for the raspberries? The freeze dried fruit I have purchased (actually I think it was powdered) has been weak and "sawdusty" in flavor, though it was from a highly rated source.

 

Interesting, Valrhona Caraibe is my main dark chocolate for shells and ganaches and I have not had problems with over-crystallization. For me it is a great chocolate to work with -- great flavor, thin shells, and enrobes nicely.

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@Kerry Beal thanks for the definitions, I've never seen the official definition requiring the 2.5% dry solids. 

 

13 hours ago, Chocolot said:

Passionfruit is $86 for 3K. Mine is on order. Will be in mid March. Tried these at FFS in January. Absolutely love the passionfruit! 

That's not a bad price, considering how intense the flavor is.  I think that will go a long way.

 

I don't think I've tried the double ferments.  I'm actually not at all interested in Callebaut's Ruby.  If Ruby is chocolate that is pink and doesn't taste like chocolate, what exactly is the appeal?  I'd rather have not-chocolate that is yellow or red and doesn't taste like chocolate because it tastes like passion fruit or strawberries.  If it's not going to taste like chocolate, it should taste like something!  And I don't like the color pink.  Mostly, I can see the Inspirations as useful and time-saving without requiring a whole lot of explanation to customers.  I do want mass appeal so I have to keep things fairly simple and focus on quality and flavor.

 

Now, I have nothing against AUI, their prices are actually a little better and my account is billed to my credit card so I get hotel points.  They're just less convenient, instead of next-morning delivery I'll have to plan for 2-3 day shipping and remember that some people don't work weekends (a continual source of frustration).  And keep more stock on hand in case of unexpected large orders.

 

As for milk chocolate, I use the Maracaibo Creole 49% primarily for the sweetness level but it's $10+/lb.  The Criolait 38% is too sweet for me.  Between the Valrhona milks, I like the Bahibe 45% far more than the Jivara 40%.  I doubt the Bahibe is less than $10/# so, I might have to go with Callebaut Alunga 42%, or local Seattle maker Theo has a 45%. 

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16 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I knew that AUI would become the sole distributor at the beginning of 2018. For me that was good news because they are located rather close to me, and if I buy enough at a time, they have free shipping. I wonder what strategy Felchlin has in mind with limiting distribution; it was always rather difficult to find.

 

I imagine the exclusivity is driven by AUI, not by Felchlin.  AUI has more warehouses and a wide customer base and can make demands.  Plus they are more pastry-focused, while Peterson has a ton of cheese and some chocolate.  So you might annoy or inconvenience a few customers but if sales grow in the long run ...

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20 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

It's not couverature though - there is no cocoa mass just fruit and cocoa butter.

 

Wow, I think I tried some store-made analogs of these Valrhona products this past Christmas.  There's a chocolatier in Toronto called Soma (pastrygirl mentioned them above) - they have a mango-chili-salt bar and a raspberry bar that I believe were also just the fruit/cocoa butter/sugar combo, and they were deeeelicious!  They were so intense and fruity in flavor and the cocoa butter was not over-powering.  A little definitely goes a long way - perhaps a used alone as a shell might be too intense/overpowering, though I might couple it with a thin layer of couverture behind it.  Who knows?!  There are sooo many flavor possibilities with this combo of freeze-dried fruit and CB, and even more when used as a shell.  I'd be curious to try it out. 

 

Here's the link to one of the bars:

https://www.somachocolate.com/collections/plain-and-simple-bars/products/copy-of-mango-chili-bar?variant=34619378445

 

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3 hours ago, pastryani said:

 

Wow, I think I tried some store-made analogs of these Valrhona products this past Christmas.  There's a chocolatier in Toronto called Soma (pastrygirl mentioned them above) - they have a mango-chili-salt bar and a raspberry bar that I believe were also just the fruit/cocoa butter/sugar combo, and they were deeeelicious!  They were so intense and fruity in flavor and the cocoa butter was not over-powering.  A little definitely goes a long way - perhaps a used alone as a shell might be too intense/overpowering, though I might couple it with a thin layer of couverture behind it.  Who knows?!  There are sooo many flavor possibilities with this combo of freeze-dried fruit and CB, and even more when used as a shell.  I'd be curious to try it out. 

 

Here's the link to one of the bars:

https://www.somachocolate.com/collections/plain-and-simple-bars/products/copy-of-mango-chili-bar?variant=34619378445

 

Yup - I tasted those ones that David made before I tasted the Valrhona product. His are fabulous. I must confess that after I tasted them I actually made my own. Mine turned out quite nicely too - right down to the chili lime salt. 

 

I think I would be kind of hesitant to use it as a shell. Certainly as a thin bar by itself.

 

 

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On 2/24/2018 at 4:32 AM, Kerry Beal said:

Yup - I tasted those ones that David made before I tasted the Valrhona product. His are fabulous. I must confess that after I tasted them I actually made my own. Mine turned out quite nicely too - right down to the chili lime salt. 

 

Do you have a recipe/process for yours (that you're willing to share :D)?  I have some freeze dried strawberry from TJs that I'd like to try this with.

 

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@pastryani

sure, my last batch was a 9 Oz can f.d. Raspberries, 340 g cocoa butter and 150 g sugar ground smooth. Then I mixed in another 750 g white chocolate to stretch and sweeten. It’s still a decent color red with nice berry flavor. 

 

I’d say start with at least an equal weight of cocoa butter and if you add sugar or anything else it depends on what fruit you start with and what you’re going for. 

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7 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

@pastryani

sure, my last batch was a 9 Oz can f.d. Raspberries, 340 g cocoa butter and 150 g sugar ground smooth. Then I mixed in another 750 g white chocolate to stretch and sweeten. It’s still a decent color red with nice berry flavor. 

 

I’d say start with at least an equal weight of cocoa butter and if you add sugar or anything else it depends on what fruit you start with and what you’re going for. 

 

Thanks @pastrygirl. Does the CB need to be warm to dissolve the fruit and sugar?  Also when you added white choc to "stretch", you meant that it gave you a larger yield?

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1 minute ago, pastryani said:

 

Thanks @pastrygirl. Does the CB need to be warm to dissolve the fruit and sugar?  Also when you added white choc to "stretch", you meant that it gave you a larger yield?

 Yes and yes. 

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