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eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel


David Ross
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4 hours ago, rob1234 said:

I made schnitzel sandwiches last night. Pounded probably 3/4" pork loin to 1/8" and it stayed 1/8" after cooking. I pounded it a ton though.

I too have a schnitzel sandwich on my list!  I've been doing different variations on fast-food style chicken sandwiches for years, but for whatever reason never thought to do a schnitzel between a bun.  Sounds interesting.

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That's one mighty-fine looking sandwich.  I'm wondering what the dressing is, looks like some sort of dill mayonnaise.  Their dressing helps me construct my schnitzel sandwich today as I've been tossing about ideas like Russian dressing or a bleu cheese mayonnaise.  I actually like the idea of dill maybe a good dose of lemon juice thrown into the mix and some paprika to loosely stay with some schnitzel seasonings.

 

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1 hour ago, brucesw said:

The menu.

 

Looks very good but I'm wanting to see the meat pounded thinner (PTL on the brain, here :B).

 

I want one of everything on the menu, please. There are No Words for how much I love German and Central European cuisine.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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Our family's preferred schnitzel—by far— has always been venison dusted with flour containing salt and pepper, pounded flat, and fried in butter!

Adapted, over time, in my paternal grandmother's family—who came from the Palatinate of the Rhine.

I grew up on the stuff!

It's my preferred way of eating venison—I love it!

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My attempt at using chicken schnitzel in a sandwich had high hopes, but fell off the ladder for the most part.  I've been making various takes on a fried chicken sandwich for years, always trying to look for the best fry on the chicken, always experimenting with the best sauce.  While this schnitzel sandwich was good, I think I put in too many other garnishes and muddied up the flavor of the schnitzel.  In the end I think I prefer just a plain traditional schnitzel with a twist of lemon, maybe a sauce served on the side.

 

I did the chicken like the first pork schnitzel I presented-flour, egg and fresh bread crumbs, then fried in canola oil until crispy.  A local bakery makes this wonderful dark Bohemian rye.  Not only is it flavorful, but sliced thicker than any of the other commercial rye and European breads we can get.  The sauce was made up of mayo, dill relish, fresh dill, dried dill weed, celery seed, caraway seed, chopped capers and salt and pepper.  The garnishes were sliced iceberg lettuce, tomato, red onion and sliced cucumber. 

 

A good sandwich, just not something I'll make again if I want a schnitzel.

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23 minutes ago, David Ross said:

A good sandwich, just not something I'll make again if I want a schnitzel.

Or a clean chin. 

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49 minutes ago, David Ross said:

 While this schnitzel sandwich was good, I think I put in too many other garnishes and muddied up the flavor of the schnitzel.  In the end I think I prefer just a plain traditional schnitzel with a twist of lemon, maybe a sauce served on the side.

 

Found the same thing. I put mayo, mustard, pickled jalapenos, cheese, and small amount of bacon on mine. For leftovers I just put the schnitzel in a bun by itself.

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I do not recall what the Portland food truck schnitzel sandwich was garnished with.  Probably not much because the meat was very thick and I had trouble getting my mouth open wide enough to bite it:o

i agree your sandwich might be better on the simpler side.

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2 hours ago, rob1234 said:

 

Found the same thing. I put mayo, mustard, pickled jalapenos, cheese, and small amount of bacon on mine. For leftovers I just put the schnitzel in a bun by itself.

That’s what I’ll do next time. No dark bread just an onion roll, schnitzel and mayo. Last week I refrigerated a schnitzel thinking it wouldn’t be crispy in the morning. It was still crispy but chilled so I think that might be delicious in a sandwich 

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So, out looking for a pork cut I wanted to use.  Stumbled into the bargain bin --bone in pork steak 1.09 /lb

 

And so it began  ( Pounded, jaccarded and rubbed with mustards and Horseradishs ) rested this way about an hour

 

5a8576f3121f8_40177804342_1c13a8441b_z1.jpg.719ce0f64ca6a57354eefdd136b79f1a.jpg

 

Then the breading ( standard method )--I used Progresso and (YES ) I added Shake an Bake ( extra crispy ) as the crumb

 

5a8577ac18b44_39313429725_3b99c06a19_z1.jpg.add56eac95fab00aa1e58d7ecfb092f2.jpg

 

Rested 4 hrs or so till dinner/  then into cast iron with Butter

 

5a8577e98e6c4_26340213018_a4fc5a3a9d_z1.jpg.aa5e57c25eefe24a1f907fa1b7fb527d.jpg

 

Plated: Smashed red potato with topping sour cream chive, parsley onion , lemon juice/ I made green apple sauce / steamed broc/ and a slice of lemon to finish

 

5a8578588cf5c_39501366184_1494a75b39_z1.jpg.1caa12389d87d807de26a949a2afeb63.jpg

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13 hours ago, David Ross said:

That’s what I’ll do next time. No dark bread just an onion roll, schnitzel and mayo. Last week I refrigerated a schnitzel thinking it wouldn’t be crispy in the morning. It was still crispy but chilled so I think that might be delicious in a sandwich 

 

My recollection is that the tenderloin sandwich I had in Indiana had only mayo and lettuce on it. May have had tomato, I don't recall. 

 

Sure was good, though.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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18 hours ago, David Ross said:

My attempt at using chicken schnitzel in a sandwich had high hopes, but fell off the ladder for the most part.  I've been making various takes on a fried chicken sandwich for years, always trying to look for the best fry on the chicken, always experimenting with the best sauce.  While this schnitzel sandwich was good, I think I put in too many other garnishes and muddied up the flavor of the schnitzel.  In the end I think I prefer just a plain traditional schnitzel with a twist of lemon, maybe a sauce served on the side.

 

I did the chicken like the first pork schnitzel I presented-flour, egg and fresh bread crumbs, then fried in canola oil until crispy.  A local bakery makes this wonderful dark Bohemian rye.  Not only is it flavorful, but sliced thicker than any of the other commercial rye and European breads we can get.  The sauce was made up of mayo, dill relish, fresh dill, dried dill weed, celery seed, caraway seed, chopped capers and salt and pepper.  The garnishes were sliced iceberg lettuce, tomato, red onion and sliced cucumber. 

 

A good sandwich, just not something I'll make again if I want a schnitzel.

005.JPG

 

 

 

 

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This definitely looks awesome and I am sure it tasted really good too.   Can you provide some more information on the sauce you used.  Even though ingredients were listed how did it turn out and did it go well with the sandwich?  Appreciate it. 

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In the Midwest we call these things " Pork tenderloins "

 

Pork Cutlet (  Center cut here  ) and Cornflake Breading  Make bigger than the Bun and only Mustard/onion and Pickle--Side of Chips

 

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Likey this:

 

6449510289_4a86dc67ba_o.thumb.jpg.5aa1a57ec1eecaf0647b5b3c8f53da36.jpg

 

 

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6 hours ago, Pooya Khodadadi said:

 

 

 

 

 

This definitely looks awesome and I am sure it tasted really good too.   Can you provide some more information on the sauce you used.  Even though ingredients were listed how did it turn out and did it go well with the sandwich?  Appreciate it. 

The flavors in the sauce were really fresh, like a homemade tartar sauce.  It was heavy on the dill, and I'd make it again to serve on the side with a schnitzel, or even better, it would be a delicious sauce for any kind of fish dish, sautéed, broiled, fried.

 

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E8561E18-E100-48D6-9D1E-93292271CF66.thumb.jpeg.1dedc6e5d463b8019e5ceb6abaea398f.jpeg

 

First Pork Tenderloin Cutlet out of the pan. The pork was butterflied and pounded thin; marinated in buttermilk, a bit of flour and spices; and after spending several hours in the refrigerator, breaded in a combo of Panko and cornmeal.

 

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Second Cutlet almost done (frying in lard)

 

7CDDC219-7A51-4048-8DFC-33CC574A1631.thumb.jpeg.36900d448b7b1fbd867e1331438b857a.jpeg

 

Pork Tenderloin Sandwich (toasted Ciabatta bun, mustard, mayo, onion and tomato) served with Cole Slaw (no photo - I forgot!)

Edited by robirdstx (log)
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Chicken schnitzel tonight.  i originally bought those cutlets in order to make chicken piccata.  I figured the piccata sauce would go well with a schnitzel treatment.

 

I made a breading of bread crumbs, Hatch red chili powder, sweet paprika and corn meal.  Then the chicken cutlets, which had been resting after salting for an hour or two, went through this sequence:

a) dredge in flour

b) dredge in an egg/water mix

c) dredge in breading

d) pan-fry in hot oil

 

It took under 3 minutes per side.  After each schnitzel was cooked, I put it atop a rack over a plate in the oven, to stay warm without getting soggy.  (Thanks for that tip about the cooling rack, @David Ross,)  When they were all done, I wiped the pan clean of the grease and breading bits, then made a butter/caper/lemon sauce in the pan. This sauce decorated the schnitzels as well as the asparagus that I'd cooked separately.

 

There were only two problems with this dish:

 

1. I forgot about swirling the pan. The coating tasted good and had a nice crunch, but wasn't as light as crispy as it might have been. I need more practice there.

 

   20180215_211421.jpg2.

 

 

2. We're arguing about the leftovers.  This stuff is nearly irresistable!

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One--- Now closed restaurant  " Harr's Waterloo " ..  Used to make a veal Schnitzel  which had a sauce on top.  Before they closed we went out to get some info on the

" special sauce "  :).

 

All I got from the server was it had cheese in it.

 

So , I suspected it was a Morney sauce.  The sauce was light brown and had a touch of sweetness, they sprinkle Paprika on top of it.  I spec so mustard was add.  Any ideas.

 

Thoughts?  Which cheese.

 

TIA  Paully

Its good to have Morels

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38 minutes ago, Paul Bacino said:

Thoughts?  Which cheese.

 

In Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany "Kochkäse" as a sauce on Schnitzel is common. It gets dusted with paprika powder before serving (sometimes raw onion is added as well ...). Any chance that description fits ?

 

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21 minutes ago, Duvel said:

 

In Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany "Kochkäse" as a sauce on Schnitzel is common. It gets dusted with paprika powder before serving (sometimes raw onion is added as well ...). Any chance that description fits ?

 

 

Possible--  I notice it has the sweet component.  Which kinda had me

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I was in the pub and taking a break from reading my book. Old food mag has something about Schnitzel but nothing new and interesting to me.

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Some tips and info.

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No air pockets then no Schnitzel.

iBunEI5.jpg

 

Might check out this place when I go to Vienna. Want to try a properly made Schnitzel at the source.

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2 minutes ago, BonVivant said:

Might check out this place when I go to Vienna. Want to try a properly made Schnitzel at the source.

 

I haven't been there myself, so I can't anything about the quality of the Schnitzel, but they use all the proper ingredients. (It's a bit too tourist-y for my tastes. The original restaurant of the same name was destroyed in 1945 and the new Meissl & Schadn opened six months ago.)

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