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David Ross

eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel

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I was showing my Schnitzel pictures to a Bolivian friend this afternoon.  She assures me Silpancho is a famous Bolivian dish of cutlets tenderized and pounded thin, breaded, fried, and served with a fried egg.  Sounds good to me.

 

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Last night's pork schnitzel with air fryer frites.  I got the cook time right this time....not over done.  Took about a minute a side.

DSC02339.thumb.jpg.abb54912f13c79899452044e2a178ea7.jpg

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The video that @BonVivant posted talks about the restaurant using pork over veal as it stays more juicy, pounding to about 3x original size from the cut shown which butterflied a slice from the loin allowing them to end up with that dinnerplate size. The idea of starting in the hot pan and then going to lower temp pans of course is a restaurant application but might adapt to one pan with heat adjustmet. The end result looks shatteringly crisp and lovely :)

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Now that I have the Paderno pounder I realized I could make my cutlets as thin as I liked.  I had vacuum sealed a couple cutlets from the other day.  These I pounded till they practically filled their bags:

 

Cutlets03152018.png

 

 

Because they were so thin they were harder to work with but not impossible...

 

Dinner03152018.png

 

 

By the way this a serving platter not a normal dinner plate.  I had two cutlets and two fried eggs.

 

 

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On ‎2‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 12:26 AM, Kim Shook said:

I am loving this thread and have a huge urge for Schnitzel now.  I love all the different versions.  For those of you who are making the tonkatsu version I can vouch for @Marlene's 3 sauce versions to go on it:

Tonkatsu Sauce

Easy Tonkatsu Sauce

Quick Tonkatsu Sauce

 

Now, I need a trip back to the Hobo Hut in Batesville IN for a pork tenderloin sandwich - mayo, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles and always bigger than the bun:

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Meet me there @caroled?  And bring your momma!

You think I could keep her away from you? And remember, I didn't go with ya'll, I was here waiting for the tamale delivery that never came! 

 

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Dropped into the grocery store before work on Saturday - found some half price veal. 

 

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This evening giving it the treatment. Seasoned flour, eggs whipped with immersion blender and panko.

 

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I have two 3/4 sheet pans with cutlets in the fridge drying now - will transfer to the freezer shortly and vacuum seal once frozen. 

 

I'll stick a few in the fridge for Tuesday's dinner. 

 

Not a bad haul for around $8.

 

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IMG_8718.jpg.307b778de133e8968c2eaf7dcf95914f.jpg

 

Not my best photo - smoke alarm set off by the second two schnitzel cooking - child started to howl - had to abandon picture taking for responsible mothering. And worse - my schnitzel were a bit browner than I like!

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In my country (Croatia) we have a bit of Scnitzel culture- Naturscnitzel (just the meat, no breading or anything else- as the name implies) is best served with glazed baby carrots (not the sort of baby carrots one gets in supermarkets but very young carrots) and breaded sorts like Vienna-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs) and Paris-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and then agin in flour).

 

What we sometimes do differently is like in case of Lika Scnitzel (Lika is mountain region of my country), is prepare them in Vienniese style and then stick them in an oven layered in marinara-like sauce (alternating layers of Scnitzels with tomato sauce, wine, garlic and parsley*) at 250°C until done and Schnitzels have absorbed most of the cooking fluids.

 

* of course, one can also add a bit of mushrooms (like button mushrooms) to the tomato sauce to make it even more delicious.


Edited by Wolf spelling errors (log)
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6 hours ago, Wolf said:

In my country (Croatia) we have a bit of Scnitzel culture- Naturscnitzel (just the meat, no breading or anything else- as the name implies) is best served with glazed baby carrots (not the sort of baby carrots one gets in supermarkets but very young carrots) and breaded sorts like Vienna-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs) and Paris-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and then agin in flour).

 

What we sometimes do differently is like in case of Lika Scnitzel (Lika is mountain region of my country), is prepare them in Vienniese style and then stick them in an oven layered in marinara-like sauce (alternating layers of Scnitzels with tomato sauce, wine, garlic and parsley*) at 250°C until done and Schnitzels have absorbed most of the cooking fluids.

 

* of course, one can also add a bit of mushrooms (like button mushrooms) to the tomato sauce to make it even more delicious.

 

 

Welcome to eGullet, @Wolf, and thank you for that information! The Lika Schnitzel sounds excellent. Is this something you make at home, or is it more a dish to be found at a restaurant?

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12 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Welcome to eGullet, @Wolf, and thank you for that information! The Lika Schnitzel sounds excellent. Is this something you make at home, or is it more a dish to be found at a restaurant?

 

Thanks, @Smithy. :) It's made at home (usually with leftover Schnitzel). Just found the alternative version, which also uses Vienna-type Schnitzel where they're simmered in white wine with parsley and garlic.

 

A slightly more sophisticated local dish with Scnitzel are so-callet ptičice (meaning little birds) made with veal Scnitzel beaten and rolled up with a mixture of bacon fried with garlic, thyme and parsley, and diced hardboiled egg is also added to the filling. It's fastened with toothpick and browned. Once browned, they're simmered (with or without added mushrooms) in a red wine and tomato sauce for half an hour.

 

And lest I forget... there is also Dalmatian Schnitzel, which is prepared with non-fried Schnitzel and is cooked similar to brudetto- alternating layers of Schnizzel, sliced tomato, sliced onion, and topped with diced garlic and parsley (repeat untill all the ingredients are used up*). Salt, pepper and olive oil. Cooked on stove-top for an hour or an hour and a half. Just like brudetto- the dish is never stirred while cooking; just grab the pot and shake it (without lifting it off the stove) once in a while.

 

* I think the last layer should be onion or tomato. As an aside to this already lengthy post (I appologize for the lack of brevity)- my so called 'friday special', or properly named false brudetto, is made with sliced potatoes instead of the meat (in that case, layers start and end with potato layers) and one adds a ¾ cup of white wine to the dish.
 

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Well, I guess it was only  a matter of time, given it's Fall and Food Network etal., is always looking to take a classic dish and push it into the mass media market.  And I'm sure there will be plenty of people who will take them up on trying this method for combining the 'haselbeck' potato technique with a 'schnitzel.'  I won't be one of them as I prefer the schnitzels we've done here in our Cook-Off.  The photo isn't very appetizing and the coating looks a bit dark, as in overcooked, and it certainly doesn't look light and crisp as I prefer in a schnitzel.....

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https://www.foodnetwork.com/holidays-and-parties/packages/fall-entertaining-guide/fall-recipes-for-entertaining-?nl=ROTD_101618_rotdimage&bid=14740509&c32=ccf52de7275ff2ce5a975dca3dc615da5d2f1714&ssid=&sni_by=1957&sni_gn=#item-8

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50 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Well, I guess it was only  a matter of time, given it's Fall and Food Network etal., is always looking to take a classic dish and push it into the mass media market.  And I'm sure there will be plenty of people who will take them up on trying this method for combining the 'haselbeck' potato technique with a 'schnitzel.'  I won't be one of them as I prefer the schnitzels we've done here in our Cook-Off.  The photo isn't very appetizing and the coating looks a bit dark, as in overcooked, and it certainly doesn't look light and crisp as I prefer in a schnitzel.....

1522679938615.jpg

 

https://www.foodnetwork.com/holidays-and-parties/packages/fall-entertaining-guide/fall-recipes-for-entertaining-?nl=ROTD_101618_rotdimage&bid=14740509&c32=ccf52de7275ff2ce5a975dca3dc615da5d2f1714&ssid=&sni_by=1957&sni_gn=#item-8

Sounds like a PITA to make it come out right and I suspect it would be difficult to avoid the panko coating from getting soggy down in the bottom of the slit.

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I find hasselbeck potatoes are more interesting looking than tasty.

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@David Ross The trick is to cut a flat edge to the waxy potato and then place it between 2 chopsticks to keep the knife from cutting through the spud. But still it isn't worth the effort. Unless I've missed something in the preparation.

 

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Why hadn't I tried this before?

Pounded some chicken breasts thin then a simple coating of herb crusted panko.  About 2  

minutes per side then into a low oven while finishing the others.

Served with some homemade applesauce, potato pancakes and a sauerkraut/red cabbage mixture.

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Here in Australia (with the kangaroos not the alps) "schnitzel" is one of the pretty standard menu items in most hotels (bars). Generally, when referring to a schnitzel, it is chicken. 

Here is a list from a menu of a typical club or hotel. Under the general heading of chicken parmigiana:

CHICKEN PARMIGIANA

(all our parmas are homemade & served with chips)

schnitzel

crumbed chicken breast served with gravy and lemon wedge

traditional

homemade napoli sauce, ham and cheese

pepperoni

salami, roast capsicum, red onion, jalapeños, chilli, tabasco and cheese

nacho

mexican salsa, cheese, corn chips, sour cream and guacamole

aussie

ham, bacon, cheese, fried egg and bbq sauce

 

They cook the parma itself and then add the toppings and place under a grill (broiler?)

The "parma" is huge, taking up half a plate and usually placed on top of the chips (fries) The toppings on each type are about the same volume as the parma. Altogether it makes a fairly substantial meal,but when you add chips & salad its a huge meal.

They are a relatively cheap meal often 1/2 ~3/4 the price of a steak type dish.

 

Most establishments would buy in their parmas (schnitzel) already breaded. I guess the reason to treat chicken this way is that the underlying meat does not have to be perfect, because the appearance is covered by the crumbs. Perhaps its a good use for factory layer hens at the end of their laying career. That may also explain why it is relatively cheap.

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I'd call the size of half a plate average. Huge is when it drapes over the sides all around. 

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