Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

David Ross

eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel

Recommended Posts

I personally wouldn't pour a sauce over a schnitzel, nor any fried food.  I just have this aversion to fried foods getting soggy.  So much so that I don't drain anything on paper towels but rather on a small rack, then immediately onto the plate.  If I wait too long before eating say a schnitzel, the bottom gets soggy sitting on the plate, which I think might happen with a sauce.  I'd be more likely to put a sauce in a small cup to dip a bite of schnitzel in. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw an episode of an Andrew Zimmern show the other night where he was traveling through the German countryside.  One local dish was a schnitzel made out of carp.  I thought that was odd, but in checking this morning it's a popular dish in Germany and the Czech Republic. Sometimes they score the fish before frying it, so in my mind since it's not a flat filet that wouldn't really be a schnitzel would it?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, David Ross said:

 One local dish was a schnitzel made out of carp.

Maybe they're operating on the same concept of chicken fried steak. If it's breaded and fried it's schnitzel. But then... where does that leave us with the unbreaded schnitzel? Must we then call that something else?

One of my pet peeves is adding to a classic dish or completely changing the recipe and still calling it by the classic name. i.e. Chicken Alfredo, Salmon Carpaccio and so on.


Edited by Tropicalsenior addition (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, cakewalk said:

What do you say about vegetarian schnitzel? Can there be such a thing? Someone had posted a photo of celeriac schnitzel. They did look good. And they had a sauce! (I can't find the post to link it here.)  

 

@koen  posted this celeriac one the other day  

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I LOVE chicken fried steak.  I never eat it out, though.  I'm addicted to my mother's which is round steak, pounded with the pointy hammer thingy.  First the big points, then the little points.  If the piece of meat is 3 times the size or bigger than the start, it's done right.  Flour, eggs, italian bread crumbs, fried in olive oil.  Mmmm.  Even better the next day cold out of the fridge.

 

No gravy for me.  I've never meat a white gravy or sausage gravy that I like.  The only exception may be what they put on Bojangles Mashed Potatoes.  And that's only because I had no choice.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/9/2018 at 11:02 AM, heidih said:

vegetarian schnitzel?

I know that I am going to offend a lot of vegetarians and vegans, but now that you asked. I respect, completely, their decision not to eat meat for whatever reason, but, why try to pretend that they are eating meat by giving it a meat name. Schnitzel is meat. Had it been a filet, I could probably have even gone along with carp  schnitzel.


Edited by Tropicalsenior Editing correction (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

Maybe they're operating on the same concept of chicken fried steak. If it's breaded and fried it's schnitzel. But then... where does that leave us with the unbreaded schnitzel? Must we then call that something else?

One of my pet peeves is adding to a classic dish or completely changing the recipe and still calling it by the classic name. i.e. Chicken Alfredo, Salmon Carpaccio and so on.

 

Yes, that happens far too often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, David Ross said:

I saw an episode of an Andrew Zimmern show the other night where he was traveling through the German countryside.  One local dish was a schnitzel made out of carp.  I thought that was odd, but in checking this morning it's a popular dish in Germany and the Czech Republic. Sometimes they score the fish before frying it, so in my mind since it's not a flat filet that wouldn't really be a schnitzel would it?

 

 

It could be either fillets or whole. Does it look like this? It's not called "carp Schnitzel", however. Official name in this region is "fried carp Franconian style". It contains beer, egg, flour. I had something similar in Czech Rep. but not a whole fish like this.

 

I1dIUQV.jpg

 

It's a speciality of Franconia (a region in Bavaria state). I ate it in Dinkelsbühl (in Middle Franconia), a beautiful little town, a small version of stunning and super touristy Rothenburg ober der Tauber. Dinkelsbuehl is proud of its fish/carp

 

The crust is nice and crunchy. How it's made (using fillets): wash the carp halves and pat dry. Stir flour, beer, oil/butter, egg yolk and spices in a large bowl. Beat the egg whites until firm and lift them under the dough. Mix everything well, so that it creates a slightly liquid dough. Turn the carp halves well, place in the heated butter and fry until golden brown.

 

EUCgwoi.jpg


Edited by BonVivant (log)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, David Ross said:

I saw an episode of an Andrew Zimmern show the other night where he was traveling through the German countryside.  One local dish was a schnitzel made out of carp.  I thought that was odd, but in checking this morning it's a popular dish in Germany and the Czech Republic. Sometimes they score the fish before frying it, so in my mind since it's not a flat filet that wouldn't really be a schnitzel would it?

 

Aside from the carp dish that @BonVivant was able to enjoy, fish fillets treated as "Schnitzel" are typically referred to as Backfisch in Germany.

While batter-fried fish (as in British fish & chips) is getting more and more common, in most traditional restaurants as well on family tables you'll find flour/egg wash/breadcrumb coated fillets shallow fried in butter fat. It is a popular item in cantines as a typical Friday dish ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going through some of my cookbooks this morning as a reference point for my first offering of our cook-off when I came upon what I think is a bit of a different schnitzel recipe.  From the cookbook "My Alpine Cookbook, Hans Gerlach" is the "K.u.k Schnitzel."  The cookbook doesn't give a direct definition of "K.u.k" but talks about traditional Austrian dishes like saftbraten covered in a sauce. So I think this is one of the schnitzels covered in sauce.  In searching further I found that "K.u.k" is most likely a reference to the Austro-Hungarian Army, 1867-1918.

 

The recipe calls for veal pounded thin.  Then brushed on both sides with spicy mustard then dusted in flour and fried in oil.  The sauce is made from a blend of onions, carrots, garlic, tomato, lemon zest, paprika, marjoram and beef or veal stock.

 

I scanned the photo from the cookbook and it looks more like an Americanized Swiss Steak to me rather than a schnitzel.

 

Kuk Schnitzel.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Americanized Swiss Steak to me rather than a schnitzel.

That's an interesting photo. You're right it does look more like Swiss steak. It's a shame to see all that sauce on a crispy fried cutlet. But what is more interesting, is that it looks like Swiss steak with mashed potatoes with a side of mashed potatoes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

That's an interesting photo. You're right it does look more like Swiss steak. It's a shame to see all that sauce on a crispy fried cutlet. But what is more interesting, is that it looks like Swiss steak with mashed potatoes with a side of mashed potatoes.

 

I think that may be butter in the bowl.

 

That schnitzel looks more like what we call Swiss Steak to me also, and probably would not be crispy.  However, I think I'd like to try that combination of flavors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/9/2018 at 10:02 AM, Duvel said:

It's funny: I have never considered having a Schnitzel unbreaded ...

 

Why would one ?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

without breading?  why not?

 

this is pork tenderloin - with and without.  sliced and pounded a bit it's fork tender.

 

DSC_2154.JPG

DSC_1031s.jpg

DSC_2162.JPG

  • Like 7
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching Rudy Maxa's World on PBS this morning and they did a segment on the black pork and a dish of pork tonkatsu.  Although it's not pounded thin like the European schnitzel, it's basically the same in terms of coated with flour, dipped in egg then bread crumbs.  But what really struck me and showed what I do when serving fried foods is that the tonkatsu was sliced then placed on a small rack which was placed over the serving plate so the bottom doesn't get soggy.  Similar to this photo:

 

33e644fc0384cd24454732108a9392c3_s.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I love about our Cook-Offs is how much I learn from everyone, and, by chance I happen to come along a new technique that I'd never considered before.  I wasn't able to find any lamb or veal for my first schnitzel so I settled on pork.  Starting with pork loin rib chops that I cut off the bone and flattened to about 1/4" thickness. 

005.JPG

008.JPG

 

I was planning on doing a comparison between using panko or fresh breadcrumbs.  I've never used fresh breadcrumbs when making a fried cutlet, but I always use fresh breadcrumbs when making the annual pear brown betty.  Nothing beats those fresh buttered bread crumbs on top of a pear betty and baked to golden brown.  But I usually only use basic supermarket white bread with the crusts cut off then pulse them into crumbs in the food processor.

 

I'm not much of a bread baker, but the day before I made a decent no-knead artisanal loaf baked in a hot Dutch oven.  I do those fairly well.  So I cut off the crusts and pulsed them into coarse crumbs.  Because of my tepid baking skills the bread was fairly dense, not light and all fluffy like supermarket white bread.  But that worked to my advantage in the end.

009.JPG

 

Seasoned the pork cutlets with salt and pepper, then a good dredge in flour, a dip in egg and a patted down blanket of the fresh bread crumbs.  Then into canola oil at 350 heated in the old standard electric skillet.

015.JPG

 

I fried the schnitzel for about 3 minutes per side, and gently shaking the skillet to push some of the oil over the top.  I turned it about 4 times.  Then using a slotted spatula lifted out of the oil to drain a bit and immediately on the dish with a sprig of flat parsley and an ode to continental dining-a slice of lemon dipped in paprika.  (An unintended benefit was the paprika lemon juice that I squeezed over the schnitzel).

 

Then a very simple cucumber salad out of one of my German cookbooks, (although it was too tangy on the vinegar and too sweet on the sugar for my tastes).  Cucumbers, red onion, apple cider vinegar, sugar, fresh dill and chives, salt, pepper and a few flakes of red pepper.

001.JPG

 

I think the greatest benefit of this Cook-Off for me so far was the revelation of using fresh bread crumbs, and the coarse crumbs from that humble loaf of bread I baked.  The schnitzel was incredibly crispy and the large crumb created more ridges which I think held it off the plate more than a flatter type schnitzel.  (Much like a proper English muffin has all sorts of little caverns in the inside to hold butter and jam).  I've been frying schnitzels for years and never came upon this technique, but now It's my standard for all sorts of similar fried foods.  Now maybe this week I'll find that veal or lamb.....

017.JPG

 

023.JPG

  • Like 12
  • Delicious 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there's only a few billion variations on "authentic" schnitzel.  if you're in Austria, go one block down and you'll find a different "authentic" prep - the dish is so old not sure the 'original' can be documented there's a rumor the technique actually came from Italy, which has similar preps.

 

interesting side trips on schnitzel road:
- the egg wash - beaten egg whites only (no yolk)
- the bread crumb - fresh i.e. not dried vs a dry crispy
- rye bread crumbs
- vs corn flakes vs wheaties vs rice krispies, and combinations with bread crumbs....
- bread crumb - or other - mixed with cornmeal, coarse vs fine textured
- just dredged in seasoned flour / cornmeal - not 'coated', no egg wash

 

in my travels a sauce usually is on the side; rarely served on the schnitzel itself except for take-offs on the original technique -jagerschnitzel with xx,xx,xx for example.

 

@David - the gurkel salat I make is just red wine vinegar and olive oil; salt pepper celery seed
over thin sliced cukes and yellow onion, no sugar at all.    not quite as 'dressed up' as that version.  

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Schnitzel.  I recently bought some EverCrisp so decided to follow the instructions on their website for breaded chicken cutlets to use with my pork tenderloin Schnitzel.

Used Panko only for the bread part on the cutlet that is the light coloured one and Panko with some Evercrisp for the darker cutlet.  DH was the judge and he deemed them the same.  But he noted that the Evercrisp cutlet did seem to keep it's 'crispness' longer than the other one.  Evercrisp is supposed to do that with fried food.  FWIW.

DSC02320.thumb.jpg.532775fc36877c3f9c28e5ce20f2a3b3.jpgDSC02321.thumb.jpg.47166293baf101871971cfb28d570ce1.jpgDSC02323.thumb.jpg.2e52998b31040b9bf76ebfad07c99916.jpg

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

I like Schnitzel.  I recently bought some EverCrisp so decided to follow the instructions on their website for breaded chicken cutlets to use with my pork tenderloin Schnitzel.

Used Panko only for the bread part on the cutlet that is the light coloured one and Panko with some Evercrisp for the darker cutlet.  DH was the judge and he deemed them the same.  But he noted that the Evercrisp cutlet did seem to keep it's 'crispness' longer than the other one.  Evercrisp is supposed to do that with fried food.  FWIW.

DSC02320.thumb.jpg.532775fc36877c3f9c28e5ce20f2a3b3.jpgDSC02321.thumb.jpg.47166293baf101871971cfb28d570ce1.jpgDSC02323.thumb.jpg.2e52998b31040b9bf76ebfad07c99916.jpg

 

What are the EverCrisp ingredients?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/9/2018 at 11:33 AM, David Ross said:

I personally wouldn't pour a sauce over a schnitzel, nor any fried food.  I just have this aversion to fried foods getting soggy.  So much so that I don't drain anything on paper towels but rather on a small rack, then immediately onto the plate.  If I wait too long before eating say a schnitzel, the bottom gets soggy sitting on the plate, which I think might happen with a sauce.  I'd be more likely to put a sauce in a small cup to dip a bite of schnitzel in. 

I think you just haven't had good fried food. If you crisp fried food and let it rest long enough, a good thick sauce will not sog it up. I swear by breaded fried flounder w/gravy and mashed potatoes. Its amazing. If done right, the breaded fish stays nice and crisp. I am sorry you cant achieve these results, its to die for. Comfort food at its finest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a native Austrian, I've got some comments here.

 

On 9.2.2018 at 3:30 PM, Duvel said:

Jägerschnitzel: mushroom cream sauce

Zigeunerschnitzel: pickled pepper and onions sauce

Rahmschnitzel: cream sauce

 

These three are normally not breaded.

 

On 9.2.2018 at 3:30 PM, Duvel said:

Kochkäseschnizel: cheese-bechamel sauce

Holsteiner Schnitzel: fried or poached egg and roasted onions

Spreewälder Schnitzel: horseradish sauce and pickled cucumber

 

These three (with the partial exception of Holsteiner Schnitzel, which historically was breaded and is not nowadays) are indeed breaded and sauced. (As an Austrian, I've very strong feelings about the kind of people who would do such a thing ... let's just say there's a reason we don't think much of German cuisine ;-) )

 

On 9.2.2018 at 3:30 PM, Duvel said:

Elsässer Schnitzel: creme fraiche with bacon and onions

 

Not breaded as far as I've seen on the internet.

 

On 9.2.2018 at 3:30 PM, Duvel said:

Schnitzel Hawaii: pineapple and baked cheese

 

A recipe based on the 50s invention of Toast Hawaii, not breaded in my cook books from the era.

 

On 9.2.2018 at 3:30 PM, Duvel said:

In Germany, the sauce defines the Schnitzel :wink:

 

Yes and no. First of all, not everything called "Schnitzel" is breaded and fried. Secondly, culinary speaking, Germany is not a unified country at all. Thirdly, while you will certainly find people (and maybe even restaurants) that make a Jägerschnitzel by making a Wiener Schnitzel and slopping a can of mushrooms over it, that's not the classical recipe at all.

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, AlaMoi said:

there's only a few billion variations on "authentic" schnitzel.  if you're in Austria, go one block down and you'll find a different "authentic" prep - the dish is so old not sure the 'original' can be documented there's a rumor the technique actually came from Italy, which has similar preps.

 

There is a classical preparation that's fairly well documented in the literature (e.g. Franz Maier-Bruck's Die österreichische Küche).

 

Regarding the theory that field marshall Radetzky brought back the Wiener Schnitzel from one of his campaigns in Italy, that has been pretty thoroughly debunked by Heinz Pohl (German only, sorry). It's a fairly newish invention, arising only in the late 19th century. The name Wiener Schnitzel is probably after the older Wiener Backhendl (Viennese fried chicken) with which it shares the breading technique.

 

Traditional side dishes for the Wiener Schnitzel are either cucumber or potato salad, although buttered potatoes with parsley are also sort-of OK. A lemon wedge is mandatory, fried parsley an optional garnish. Outside of Vienna, especially the farther west you go, you will be served Preiselbeermarmelade (a fruit akin to cranberries) and maybe even rice. While these may be minor heresies, you will never, ever be served any kind of sauce with your Wiener Schnitzel in Austria.


Edited by pep. typo (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/6/2018 at 5:02 PM, Dave the Cook said:

 

I vote yes. Also: chicken-fried steak.

This declaration right here made my husband a very happy man last night.  This is one of his favorite things to eat.  It would have never crossed my mind that chicken fried venison steak would be considered a schnitzel.  But, it is pounded and breaded and fried so it fits right in :) .

 

Venison loin (backstrap)

 

IMG_4076.jpg.e7b2b87cbfa1bda578f31ecc99278b1e.jpg

IMG_4080.JPG.9954a565bba04568ffa49d18fc72cb75.JPG

IMG_4081.JPG.d75001c4a5be3760a90f8e0f98797349.JPG

Soaked in a mixture of one beaten egg and buttermilk for about 30 mins or so

 

IMG_4082.jpg.22d1f6c86be3a61e1bf942bf12074d17.jpg

I throw flour, Lawry's salt, garlic and a lot of black pepper in a large ziplock and use that to coat the steaks and make gravy.

IMG_4083.jpg.8192709697a2712b2bea014818353550.jpg

 

I got a little excited over the gravy and took too many pictures.

 

Chicken skin from a breast I used the night before for dinner

IMG_4084.JPG.504f884bc86fbf7b41bbca4b35a08067.JPG

All crisped up--I like my gravy to have some of this in there...

IMG_4085.JPG.5621ba6e2d01d997e319f976bd92f13c.JPG

Flour added

IMG_4086.JPG.5f7fc26c0b5718f0fe3d9315e36479a1.JPG

IMG_4087.JPG.67f6718142d67be37b734f9863b02cac.JPG

Then a lot of milk

IMG_4088.JPG.edfd4b06f5ab9171eb5fd43010fc619b.JPG

Stir stir stir

IMG_4089.JPG.eb662493d0faab3ff87ed9f6aa9edc23.JPG

More salt, pepper and garlic

IMG_4090.JPG.cbf521d47f7410009188ef5a8ea25fbd.JPG

The best dang cream gravy

IMG_4091.JPG.bfe55215271d63460fc84214f950498d.JPG

 

Mashed taters

IMG_4092.JPG.d526f7e896a00a31e908f2e9d596f04c.JPG

 

Dredge the steaks in the flour mixture and fry 'em up

 

IMG_4093.jpg.39817a8e02edd886085ef08971eedaa4.jpg

IMG_4094.JPG.2c0e4d10318388ec941599a25347570b.JPG

Ronnie's plate-he likes gravy on his steak

 

IMG_4095.jpg.8c5e9f1908a070b8933ced068e3b97b8.jpg

I prefer it on the taters and then I dip a piece of steak in once in a while

 

IMG_4097.JPG.3c6a7ceeccfc8fa2787a80c9c83fe355.JPG


Edited by Shelby (log)
  • Like 15
  • Delicious 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×