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Chris Hennes

Cooking with Madhur Jaffrey's Vegetarian India

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Spicy Peanut Crumble (p. 311)

 

Just peanuts, salt, and chili powder, ground to a coarse crumble. I had no idea such things were still considered "chutneys."

 

Spicy Peanut Crumble p311.jpg

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Simple Tamarind Chutney (p. 308)

 

Tamarind concentrate, sugar, salt, and toasted cumin. It seems that mine came out thinner than hers did, but I'm not sure why. I believe I was even able to get the exact tamarind concentrate that she uses (Tamicon, sold in squeeze bottles).

 

Simple Tamarind Chutney p308.jpg

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Simple Toovar Dal from the Chitrapur Saraswat Brahmins of Coastal Kannada (p. 160)

 

This is a toovar dal cooked and mashed a bit to give a chunky puree and then finished with a simple tarka, heavy on the curry leaves and with several halves cloves of garlic. I replaced the whole red chile with a small scoop of the crushed chile I use for Sichuan Chili Oil, because I love that stuff and I like the additional heat you get from eating the pepper instead of discarding it.

 

Simple Toovar Dal from the Chitrapur Saraswat Brahmins of Coastal Kannada.jpg

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I hate this topic! :(

 

I love Indian food, and I've drooled so much over my keyboard, I'm going to have to buy a new one. Unfortunately, it is near impossible to buy Indian spices here (China and India have long had a poor relationship), but I'm due to visit Hong Kong in March and will be heading straight to one of the many excellent Indian restaurant there (after a pint or three of Guinness in my favourite HK Irish bar).

Until then I'll be reading every post and cursing in envy.

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I hate this topic! :(

 

I love Indian food, and I've drooled so much over my keyboard, I'm going to have to buy a new one. Unfortunately, it is near impossible to buy Indian spices here (China and India have long had a poor relationship), but I'm due to visit Hong Kong in March and will be heading straight to one of the many excellent Indian restaurant there (after a pint or three of Guinness in my favourite HK Irish bar).

Until then I'll be reading every post and cursing in envy.

 

Perhaps you should also head to a spice supplier, because you have available many other ingredients for Indian cooking at home. You were most helpful to me when I asked about Indian Vegetables I was ignorant of. Turns out that many of those are also available in China.

 

I love Indian food too. Most of it looks like a dog's dinner, but it sure tastes good.

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22 minutes ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Perhaps you should also head to a spice supplier, because you have available many other ingredients for Indian cooking at home. You were most helpful to me when I asked about Indian Vegetables I was ignorant of. Turns out that many of those are also available in China.

 

I love Indian food too. Most of it looks like a dog's dinner, but it sure tastes good.

 

The vegetation is similar and there are many in common. Most spices not at all.

I can buy "Indian" spices, but only by the kilo and at exorbitant prices.

Anyway back to Chris and his torturous posts!


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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Really enjoying this thread, I have to say. I've never seen chapattis done in an oven before. Am I misreading this? @Chris Hennes, is that Madhur Jaffrey's instruction? I grew up eating chapattis in Kerala and considered it native, but it is really North Indian in origin. We do it on a skillet down south.

So sad that I only have supermarket soup waiting for me in the fridge upstairs in the staff room.


Edited by Kerala spleling (log)

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2 hours ago, Kerala said:

I've never seen chapattis done in an oven before. Am I misreading this?

 

If you're referring to this post, they are done on a griddle.

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Thanks for this @Chris Hennes, I cook Indian food every day, mostly vegetarian and I love Madhur Jaffreys recipes. It just so happens that the largest book fair in our city happens this weekend, I’ll be looking out for Vegetarian India.

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"Risotto" of Dal, Rice, and Vegetables (p. 214)

 

This is basically a moong dal porridge with cauliflower and peas, finished with a striking tarka that includes tomato puree, hence the color.

 

-Risotto- of Dal, Rice, and Vegetables.jpg

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7 hours ago, sartoric said:

Thanks for this @Chris Hennes, I cook Indian food every day, mostly vegetarian and I love Madhur Jaffreys recipes. It just so happens that the largest book fair in our city happens this weekend, I’ll be looking out for Vegetarian India.

 

The book was published as Curry Easy Vegetarian in the UK.  That might be the title to look for in Australia.

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Simple Toovar Dal (p. 158)

 

She has several "simple" dal recipes from various regions: in this one the dal are lightly mashed and served with a simple tarka poured over the top, lime wedges on the side. It's the only one I've run across that has a fresh citrus component at the end, and it's delicious.

 

Simple Toovar Dal p158.jpg

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On 07/02/2018 at 6:52 PM, Chimayo Joe said:

 

The book was published as Curry Easy Vegetarian in the UK.  That might be the title to look for in Australia.

Thanks for that, I think I’ve borrowed Curry Easy Vegetarian from the library, err, several times :)

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Stir-Fried Spinach, Andhra-Style (p. 112)

 

In her writeup she suggests that this type of dish involves stir-frying something until it is crisp: but this dish is definitely not crisp! Which isn't to say it wasn't delicious, but I don't understand the disconnect between the recipe intro and the actual recipe.

 

Stir-Fried Spinach, Andhra-Style p112.jpg

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1 hour ago, Chris Hennes said:

Stir-Fried Spinach, Andhra-Style (p. 112)

 

In her writeup she suggests that this type of dish involves stir-frying something until it is crisp: but this dish is definitely not crisp! Which isn't to say it wasn't delicious, but I don't understand the disconnect between the recipe intro and the actual recipe.

 

 

I know you can't post the recipe, but can you say what is with the spinach. It looks like something I'd very much like to eat.

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@liuzhou -- you start a tarka with cumin seeds, whole garlic, fenugreek seeds and curry leaves. Add a chopped onion and saute until soft, then add ginger and chopped garlic. Finally, a pinch of turmeric, some coriander, and some chili powder. Stir the wilted spinach into this and saute for ten minutes for so.

 

Edited to add: it's pretty close to this recipe at Saveur.


Edited by Chris Hennes (log)
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36 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

I know you can't post the recipe, but can you say what is with the spinach. It looks like something I'd very much like to eat.

 

This recipe, Palakoora Vepadu (Andhra-Style Sautéed Spinach, credited to the cookbook author,  is quite similar to the one in the cookbook. 

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3 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

Stir-Fried Spinach, Andhra-Style (p. 112)

 

In her writeup she suggests that this type of dish involves stir-frying something until it is crisp: but this dish is definitely not crisp! Which isn't to say it wasn't delicious, but I don't understand the disconnect between the recipe intro and the actual recipe.

 

Stir-Fried Spinach, Andhra-Style p112.jpg

 

Is this how it was worded in Vegetarian India?

 

"In Andhra, ‘vepadu’ refers to dishes that are either stir-fried or deep-fried until they are crisp" (Curry Easy Vegetarian)

 

I think she communicated poorly and meant "crisp" just to apply to the deep-fried dishes.

 

Stir-fried vepudu is similar to other stir-fried dishes of South India known by various names depending on the language of the state (thoran in Kerala, poriyal in Tamil Nadu, palya in Karnataka.)


Edited by Chimayo Joe (log)
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Flattened Rice with Potatoes (p. 199)

 

One of several recipes for flattened rice, all of which are very fast to prepare so make ideal weeknight dinners. In this case you make a tarka and then toss cooked potato cubes into it before mixing with the pre-soaked flattened rice. Top with cilantro and lime. I had cooked the potatoes the day before, so it came together in about ten minutes.

 

Flattened Rice with Potatoes p199.jpg

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Simple Seasoned Yogurt, North Indian-Style (p. 326)

 

This is just yogurt with salt and a bit of cumin and chili powder mixed in, plus some more of the spices sprinkled on top.

 

Simple Seasoned Yogurt, North Indian-Style p326.jpg

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Stir-Fried Fresh Indian Cheese with Green Peppers (p. 294)

 

Stir-Fried Fresh Indian Cheese with Green Peppers p294.jpg

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Simple Seasoned Yogurt, Telangana Style (p. 327)

 

In this one you put the turmeric raw on the top of the yogurt and pour the hot tarka over it.

 

Simple Seasoned Yogurt, Telengana-Style p327.jpg

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Indian-Style Bean Sprouts with Onions, Ginger, and Garlic (p. 146)

 

I don't normally think of bean sprouts as something you eat warm, so this dish was an unusual one for me. These are sprouted mung beans cooked in a simple style with onion, garlic, ginger, green chili, coriander, turmeric, and chili powder (a spice setup which describes nearly every dish in this book!). Topped with fresh tomatoes and cilantro.

 

Indian-style Bean Sprouts with Onions, Ginger, and Garlic p146.jpg

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Nepalese "Pickled" Potatoes (p. 344)

 

This potato salad is flavored predominantly with sesame paste and mustard oil, with chili powder, turmeric, green chilies, lemon juice, and cilantro rounding out the flavors. It looks more or less like a standard American-style potato salad, but tastes nothing like one (of course). I enjoyed the flavors, particularly the pungency of the mustard oil and the heat from the chilies.

 

Nepalese -Pickled- Potatoes p344.jpg

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