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blue_dolphin

Cooking with Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden

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Grilled carrots, steak and red onion with spicy fish–sauce sauce. 

 

This turned out slightly better than I expected but it is not one that I am likely to repeat.

 

The carrots and onions were cooked on a grill pan as I really have no access to a an outdoor grill. (I can see it there under the snow but it hasn’t been used much since my husband died back in 2011). 

 

Joshua’s argument that vegetables should be cooked without oil on a grill might have some merit but they don’t seem to cook very well without oil on a grill pan.  I did suspect this before I even started.  If I really had to repeat the recipe without access to an outdoor grill I would roast theccarrots and onions with a drizzle of oil and some seasonings in the oven. 

 

 I quite liked the sauce. I made just a half recipe and used a quarter of the hot peppers called for since I was using scotch bonnet.  This time at least I was smart enough to wear gloves!  

 

I came up a little short on herbs having access to only some rather sad basil and equally sad mint. This is the middle of winter in Ontario!  

 

I hope someone else makes it and passes on their opinion.

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That looks delicious, @Anna N!  I've got the Spicy Fish Sauce Sauce on hand so I'll make this recipe one of these days.  The book says the Spicy Fish Sauce Sauce is good for a month or two.  And yes, I do like saying Spicy Fish Sauce Sauce xD

 

If you've got any leftover, it's also used in the Fried Cauliflower p 194 that I made with roasted cauliflower instead, the Grilled Wax Beans & Tomatoes, Basil & Spicy Fish Sauce Sauce, the Squash Ribbons with Tomatoes, Peanuts, Basil, Mint & Spicy Fish Sauce Sauce and optionally in the Sautéed Greens with Olives p 105. 

Several of them are also using fresh herbs, which I understand aren't in good supply at this time of year.

 

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One of the variations for the Cream of Celery Soup from Six Seasons p 150 that I posted above is to use it as the base for "a delicate seafood stew."  I did that here, using a mix of shrimp, scallops and squid.

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I added a squeeze of lemon juice, a squirt of yuzu hot sauce and about 1/2 the specified amount of cream. I thought it was going to taste like celery soup with a few fishy bits floating in it but it actually came together as its own dish. 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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On 31/01/2018 at 4:15 PM, Katie Meadow said:

So if you love the taste of kale go for it. I like spinach for a gratin, baby collards as a vinegary side and chard for most everything else. One vendor at the Berkeley Farmers' Market used to have baby Russian Kale.. When it was tiny it was quite good in a saute of mixed greens, but I haven't seen it recently. As for dark greens right now I'm totally into Choi Sum--sort of a cousin of bok choi, but the leaves are darker and tastier. Great in any stir fry or tossed into Asian soups.

 

I like all the cooked greens. I've been eating kale for decades, much longer than it's been fashionable, and I'm happy that its current moment makes it easier to find. I'm not that keen on it raw, except for baby kale in salads, so I usually eat it cooked. I like the sturdier texture. I'm partial to chard as well, though I find its earthiness sometimes doesn't work as well in a given dish. I appreciate dandelion greens, rapini and many of the Asian greens for their bitter and/or peppery flavors, but spinach (for when I don't want texture) and kale (for when I do) are my two mainstays. 

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More kale talk....hmmmm.  

 

This is the Celery Salad with Dates, Almonds & Parmigiano from Six Seasons p 145. Nice combination of sweet-salty-tangy flavor elements in a crisp, crunchy salad.  

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I subbed hazelnuts and Deglet Noor dates for the almonds and Medjool dates specified for the salad. Otherwise, it was per the book.

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Hi!

 

I really like the book. I actually ordered after "getting a bit stuck" with side dishes. I discovered that I had developed a certain repertoire that I kept using. This book really overdeliveres for me. There's just so much inspiration coming from it. Almost every recipe in there is a combination of textures/flavors thats relatively unique. And once you tried it, my brain goes like "ah if this works, this might also work. And why not swap this for that? And why don't we also try it that way". 

 

Last week I made these schitzels out of celeriac, with mandarines and a sauce with horseradish, all loosely based on one of the recipes coming from the book. Add some salad, and BOOM! Weeknight dinner.

2018-01-30 19.37.45-2.jpg

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Nice one, @koen!  That recipe for fried celeriac steaks with blood orange and fresh horseradish is one that I've been wanting to try.

 

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3 hours ago, koen said:

Hi!

 

I really like the book. I actually ordered after "getting a bit stuck" with side dishes. I discovered that I had developed a certain repertoire that I kept using. This book really overdeliveres for me. There's just so much inspiration coming from it. Almost every recipe in there is a combination of textures/flavors thats relatively unique. And once you tried it, my brain goes like "ah if this works, this might also work. And why not swap this for that? And why don't we also try it that way". 

 

Last week I made these schitzels out of celeriac, with mandarines and a sauce with horseradish, all loosely based on one of the recipes coming from the book. Add some salad, and BOOM! Weeknight dinner.

2018-01-30 19.37.45-2.jpg

This would be an interesting addition to the schnitzel cookoff! 

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