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blue_dolphin

Cooking with Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden

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3 hours ago, David Ross said:

But I'm especially intrigued by watercress butter, which I think would be very good with seafood and chicken.

Man, that stuff would be good with just about anything.

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31 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

Man, that stuff would be good with just about anything.

Yes I'm already thinking of broiling salmon then with the watercress butter on top and maybe mixing some of it into a pasta to go with the salmon.  I saw your photo and then thought, why didn't I think of watercress butter?

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I think compound butters are a "new but old" thing  @HungryC as I recall does  ramp butter :)  As a side note the roasted shallot yogurt from White Mustache intrigues

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I love compound butters and have several in the freezer....a quick and easy way to add something special to a dish.

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Pistachio butter (page 37)

 

At first glance this looks like a normal pistachio butter recipe, but delving deeper reveals a much more interesting beast. In addition to pistachios and salt, the recipe calls for a small amount of vinegar and olive oil. I wouldn't put it on a sandwich, but as a topping for roasted vegetables the vinegar in particular adds a terrific, if subtle, acidity. I was surprised when looking the recipe up on Eat Your Books a moment ago to note that this does not seem to be the consensus opinion... a couple people commented that they didn't like the vinegar addition, or that it required agrodolce. I couldn't disagree more.

 

DSC_7096.jpg

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I'm ready for another round of that pistachio butter so I can make the beet slaw again.  That's one of my favorite combinations of flavors and textures in the book. 

 

3 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

I was surprised when looking the recipe up on Eat Your Books a moment ago to note that this does not seem to be the consensus opinion... a couple people commented that they didn't like the vinegar addition, or that it required agrodolce. I couldn't disagree more.

 

I used a regular vinegar when I made this but I've since purchased the Katz vinegars the author recommends.  Made from late-harvest grapes, they have a bit more sweetness but the level of acidity (5.8% for the zin and 5.5% for the sauv blanc) are on a par with other vinegars. It will likely add a touch of sweetness but I don't think that will detract from the dish.  We'll see.

 

 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)

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4 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

Pistachio butter (page 37)

 

At first glance this looks like a normal pistachio butter recipe, but delving deeper reveals a much more interesting beast. In addition to pistachios and salt, the recipe calls for a small amount of vinegar and olive oil. I wouldn't put it on a sandwich, but as a topping for roasted vegetables the vinegar in particular adds a terrific, if subtle, acidity. I was surprised when looking the recipe up on Eat Your Books a moment ago to note that this does not seem to be the consensus opinion... a couple people commented that they didn't like the vinegar addition, or that it required agrodolce. I couldn't disagree more.

 

DSC_7096.jpg

 

Reminds me a bit of Georgian walnut sauce.

 

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19 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Reminds me a bit of Georgian walnut sauce.

 

Or the sesame paste / peanut butter & vinegar combinations in Chinese cuisine ...

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Raw Winter Squash with brown Butter, Pecans, and Currants (p. 377)

I'm not sold on the texture of raw winter squash. I used a vegetable peeler to make the ribbons, so I probably couldn't realistically get them much thinner, but I still found them to have a bit too much chew to them. The flavors in this salad are good, but I might be inclined to try to heat up the squash and get it to soften just the tiniest bit.

 

 

DSC_8238.jpg

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