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Hey I was just sitting around and I wondered, "Im in Pennsylvania, Amish food here is called PA Dutch food, but Amish are in other states too, do they have like 'Michigan Dutch Food'?"

 

Is Amish food the same all over the USA?

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If you google Amish America you will find an on line encyclopedia about Amish culture.  All

kinds of info on about every aspect of their lives.  Plenty of it  involves food.  

We have more than 200 Amish families in our county.  If you could sneek a look into the 

grocery cart of a younger Amish shopper, it would be pretty much  like anyone's.  What'would 

be lacking would be all the frozen items.  But, I know more than one family that has a

freezer rub by a diesel  generator.  

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Posted (edited)

@IowaDee I know a great deal about the Amish, at one point I was an Anabaptist. my eGullet name is an Amish dessert, so thanks. but Im asking about regional differences in food.


Edited by GlorifiedRice (log)

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1 hour ago, GlorifiedRice said:

@IowaDee I know a great deal about the Amish, at one point I was an Anabaptist. my eGullet name is an Amish dessert, so thanks. but Im asking about regional differences in food.

 

I've been wondering about your eG name for a while...

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I think Pennsylvania Dutch is a much broader designation than just the Amish, and it refers to food (or culture in its various aspects) that originated in Pennsylvania from various groups of German immigrants. The Amish are just one of those groups. But just because the food originated in a particular place doesn't mean it would lose its name if it spread elsewhere. (I've actually never heard the term Pennsylvania Amish Dutch in reference to food.)

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1 minute ago, gfweb said:

I've been wondering about your eG name for a while...

 

Go to Shady Maple its delicious.

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Like if I went to Michigan (Dr Pol) country. would they have Chow Chow or Schnitz und Knepp or ShooFly Pie? Or does Michigan have regional ingredients that the Amish have blended in.

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I grew up in a county which held the distinction for a while of being the largest sorghum molasses producing county in the nation. We had a number of Amish families, one group of which had a sorghum mill (made some of the best sorghum out there, too!).

 

I suspect that Amish cuisine is about like any other cuisine that gets transplanted somewhere; it picks up from where it's set down, and adds other things that come afterward. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, GlorifiedRice said:

 

Go to Shady Maple its delicious.

Its been ages.  Not far away either.

 

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Just now, gfweb said:

Its been ages.  Not far away either.

 

 

 

Its like Ambrosia, but pink. Rice, maraschinos, pineapple, marshmallows. in some kinda creamy pudding.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, cakewalk said:

I think Pennsylvania Dutch is a much broader designation than just the Amish, and it refers to food (or culture in its various aspects) that originated in Pennsylvania from various groups of German immigrants. The Amish are just one of those groups. But just because the food originated in a particular place doesn't mean it would lose its name if it spread elsewhere. (I've actually never heard the term Pennsylvania Amish Dutch in reference to food.)

 

Yeah! That!

One of my ancestors—my maternal grandmother's line—came here, to Philadelphia, from the Palatinate of the Rhine, in 1733 via the King of England.

As did many Amish (or Pennsylvania Dutch),

Many of their food traditions were/are the same.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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