Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

BonVivant

Lunch! What'd ya have? (2018)

Recommended Posts

Lunch at Jimmy Changas in League City yesterday.

 

9CF35409-85F6-4213-9540-B140BBAA6B2A.thumb.jpeg.5da5d5c066d966a38323bf5801683110.jpeg

CARNE GUISADA - braised short ribs simmered with tomatoes, bell peppers, onions, garlic & spices to make a flavorful gravy — served with guacamole and pico de gallo

3CAB5F26-73C8-4EB8-8C9B-C9D2E6795AD1.thumb.jpeg.bd3292825198e9224f029c78a3e0cc1a.jpeg

 

Served with Spanish Rice, Charro Beans and Flour Tortillas

 

23351A78-19B2-4EE2-95CD-5800A094E03C.thumb.jpeg.292a7d43d77843dc561b183ef465b1d8.jpeg

 

  • Like 6
  • Delicious 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Homemade corned pork tongue, grilled Reuben sandwich and a new favorite, homemade, lightly sweetened lime acqua frizzante.

HC

IMG_2267.thumb.JPG.e188ba691e063e0a08d4e26d95e6d87e.JPGIMG_2287.thumb.JPG.70dcb5c5970b0fe866226daced31dd1e.JPGIMG_2292.thumb.JPG.4ea08e560532c20153376599fd1eb6b2.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woo Hoo! A bit of tongue on tongue action. 😛

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1833844A-B02E-419A-AC03-145F2B1D463F.thumb.jpeg.d0fb08cf2ec2b938a63f2d593dd1342b.jpeg

 

1/3 Lb. Cheeseburger (with lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo and mustard on a toasted bun) to go from Boyd’s, Texas City.


Edited by robirdstx (log)
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, HungryChris said:

and a new favorite, homemade, lightly sweetened lime acqua frizzante.

 

This beverage seems to be carbonated. It sounds perfectly delicious and wonderful.

 

How do you achieve that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bun cha ca & banh mi in a small, non-descript (and yet surprisingly popular) shop in the Mid-levels, Central, HK...

 

34C2AC2F-F978-480A-B445-BDB919751D3A.jpeg

81EC27C2-1D85-4E26-947F-A1F58619CA26.jpeg

958707DD-3AA4-4A26-9EAB-3CF57226F769.jpeg

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

This beverage seems to be carbonated. It sounds perfectly delicious and wonderful.

 

How do you achieve that?

It is not for the faint of heart, but once you get the moves down, it is pretty simple.  This is the industrial version of a soda stream, that I bought on Amazon for about $169. Instead of the cartridges you have a five pound CO2 tank, that, once you get filled, should last a year or more of everyday use and costs about $20 to fill. This is what it looks like. The gauge on the left, tells you the pressure in the tank and the gauge on top is adjusted by the red knob. I have read that just below 40 PSI is about perfect for this application, so that is where I have it set.IMG_2304.thumb.JPG.3b05abf846aaf2e41108b6029cddceeb.JPG

IMG_2306.thumb.JPG.386a33e6be2db7c5b749088595c975e4.JPG

I bought stopper top glass bottles to store the product in, but the stoppers let too much of the fizz out, so I have come to use 1 liter, screw top soda bottles for both CO2 injection and storage.

I add the juice of half a lime to each bottle.

IMG_2271.thumb.JPG.3cfb5286805886dd351229e49fa3c6d0.JPG

And add 3 packets of sucralose (from Aldi) to each as well.

IMG_2274.thumb.JPG.69a8be6ab0938a03f4fb7c654d2eb2d4.JPG

You need a little "head space" in each bottle to allow for CO2 absorption, so they are not filled with tap water all the way to the top. Then the carbonator cap is screwed on just enough to allow you to squeeze out the air, then tightened down.

IMG_2279.thumb.JPG.12eeb040758fb0ec3a2ce69a5c8a7215.JPG

The whole thing is assembled by connecting it all up.

IMG_2280.thumb.JPG.aba8ecdac5dc39101a6b64671e303bbb.JPG

Then you open the valves to turn on the CO2, turn the bottle upside down, and shake the heck out of it, noticing that every time you do, more CO2 flows in. Keep doing that until the CO2 flow slows way down telling you that the solution is just about saturated with carbonation. Having the liquid as cold as possible allows for more CO2 absorption, so chill it down first.

HCIMG_2284.thumb.JPG.b60627b8bb90b268a1b784e8784d3320.JPG

IMG_2292.thumb.JPG.f1ac0f539a51fa59d7c3fcdb6ac80d74.JPG

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Shanghai favourite. 猪肉荠菜馄饨 zhū ròu jì cài hún tún - Pork and Shepherd's purse (荠菜 jì cài) wontons with wilted, shredded lettuce (生菜 shēng cài).

 

Wontons were cooked in a peppery chicken broth and the lettuce thrown in for the last 30 seconds. Drained and served. I could have served them with the broth, but wasn't in a soup mood.

 

lunchoh.thumb.jpg.c06f05e65cc2ecf30715eb8494bd4f15.jpg

 

lunchcu.thumb.jpg.0b1d72ff15eb8852e19d7b456216c0ae.jpg

 

 


Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, liuzhou said:

A Shanghai favourite. 猪肉荠菜馄饨 zhū ròu jì cài hún tún - Pork and Shepherd's purse wontons with wilted, shredded lettuce (生菜 shēng cài).

 

Wontons were cooked in a peppery chicken broth and the lettuce thrown in for the last 30 seconds. Drained and served. I ocould have served them with the broth, but wasn't in a soup mood.

 

lunchoh.thumb.jpg.c06f05e65cc2ecf30715eb8494bd4f15.jpg

 

lunchcu.thumb.jpg.0b1d72ff15eb8852e19d7b456216c0ae.jpg

 

 

 

What's the filling in the wontons?  Do you make them, or are they available for purchase (uncooked)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, KennethT said:

What's the filling in the wontons?  Do you make them, or are they available for purchase (uncooked)?

 

The filling is the pork and shepherd's purse. I made these ones, using market-bought wrappers. Various wontons, including with this filling, are also available frozen (uncooked)  from most supermarkets.  I rarely buy the frozen ones. I prefer to know exactly what is in them and know the quality of the pork.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liuzhou Sorry for the question - I didn't realize that shepherd's purse was an ingredient!  I had never heard of it before...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@liuzhou Sorry for the question - I didn't realize that shepherd's purse was an ingredient!  I had never heard of it before...

Me neither. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@liuzhou Sorry for the question - I didn't realize that shepherd's purse was an ingredient!  I had never heard of it before...

 

9 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Me neither. 

 

Oh. I didn't realise it was not so well known. We certainly have it in the UK and it grows in North America, although it appears in very limited areas.

 

Very common here in China.

https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=CABU2


 


Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

We certainly have it in the UK and it grows in North America, although it appears in very limited areas.

 Apparently it was used by many indigenous tribes as both a vegetable and the seeds  were ground into a flour  for breadmaking. That is according to Mr. Google. Have not verified this information. Perhaps some of our foragers will chime in.  I am thinking especially of @gfron1

 

 Edited to add:

I am sure I have seen it somewhere in the wild. I’m not sure where.


Edited by Anna N (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@liuzhou

 

is  it used for its flavor or more for its supposed medicinal properties ?

 

Mostly for flavour. It is just one of the many greens people eat here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Anna N said:

 Apparently it was used by many indigenous tribes as both a vegetable and the seeds  were ground into a flour  for breadmaking. That is according to Mr. Google. Have not verified this information. Perhaps some of our foragers will chime in.  I am thinking especially of @gfron1

 

 Edited to add:

I am sure I have seen it somewhere in the wild. I’m not sure where.

 

I've not heard of it as a food in North America, but certainly for medicinal purposes. The Chippewa and Cheyenne both used it for pain relief, and I seem to recall other tribes using for other medicinal purposes. But, as for food that is new to me.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Son of a gun. I was looking at that in a neighbour's yard just a week or two ago, thinking it looked like some kind of a brassica. Now I know...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

533C9A08-90D0-428A-8F0A-CD399DD49FFC.thumb.jpeg.de99428915e5d095b1ba7ab97ef0dbf8.jpeg

 

Costco rotisserie chicken thigh and a vermicelli noodle and seaweed salad. Not sure if it’s a late lunch, an early dinner or a combination of both. 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First lunch in Yonaguni. Braised belly pork hidden under a pile of green onions.

WRDXLcF.jpg

 

ez3gjDz.jpg

 

u5atZaC.jpg

 

Tonkatsu also came with a small bowl of Yonaguni soba noodle soup (besides rice).

oDRJnan.jpg

 

Ppk6XpJ.jpg

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

getting ready to reheat some mashed potatoes, honey and oil carrots and peas and a mini meatloaf.  Decided to try a Taste of Home recipe for bbq meatloaf muffins.  Way easy and not bad at all.  Will use it again but with a few modifications(NOTE TO SELF: spray the pan despite what the recipe says).

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FA96D706-7453-4389-99C6-EA0AA31DC9B9.thumb.jpeg.689b41c22c42c7d94c3083d9757a7dd4.jpeg

 

Japanese white stew made with rotisserie chicken. One can buy roux for this just  as one can buy it to make curry. However, no roux was harmed in the making of this stew. 

 

92296D8A-6D6A-4FB1-81CC-729E858A8EF6.thumb.jpeg.caff0464445be8197394dfc740fb7091.jpeg

 

 Served with some rice. I had serious doubts about this dish but it is in fact quite tasty. There are so many different recipes out there so I just basically winged it. I had a tiny amount of cream cheese left over from another project so it went in there as I had found at least one recipe that used cream cheese!  

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4E6C7D4B-8911-4BE6-BC5B-4243F8DA8AC8.thumb.jpeg.192a40fb9ee9ec51f90002a38952656c.jpeg

 

À la carte from the menu at Galveston’s Shrimp ‘N Stuff: 1 Fried Catfish, 1 Fish Taco (with everything) and a Dos Equis with Lime

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grilled pork chop and white asparagus.  Pork marinade (red wine, garlic, Lao Gan Ma) was reduced and served on the side.  Perfect weather for outside eating at Chesapeake Beach.

3B62130A-4C18-4CE3-ACE5-8715C5707F3F.thumb.jpeg.8d0a698134417378dc926d7926f9e677.jpeg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×