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Dinner 2018


liuzhou
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11 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

I'm sure it was, but it's just our Western way of thinking that causes awful shivers to go down  our spine at the word offal. When you mentioned steak and kidney pie the other day my immediate thought was, yuck. Then I remembered that one of my favorite parts of fried chicken is the kidney. As youngest child in the family, whenever we had fried chicken, that was the piece I got. Until some of my older siblings left home, I didn't even know that the chicken had a breast.

 

 

I think it's more American than totally western. I'm western, too. Europe is a lot less squeamish about offal. I was brought up on the stuff.

That said,  I do remember a good Austrian friend in Vienna being horrified at what I ordered in a restaurant - but it was very Austrian food!

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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5 minutes ago, Duvel said:

@liuzhou

 

Nice dinner ... any detail on the Tofu dish ?

 

A little. It is tofu which has been frozen then defrosted and fried. The freezing changes the texture and causes those bubbles you may see.  I couldn't work out what the sauce was. It was fairly bland.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Braciole

 

Flannery Flank /--stuffed with Serrano ham/ Blk Kale/ two cheeses/ garlic and onion -- we sous vide this for 10 hrs @135F... 

 

I had two steaks left/  this is what it looked like cooled the next day

 

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Today.  .Wife is hitting the HallMark channel (  U KNow the Valentine Gig )   So I used these two steaks and added them to my Sunday gravy

 

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Its good to have Morels

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I think it's more American than totally western.

You're right, of course. I should have been more specific. Although, the prejudice isn't limited just to North Americans. Mexicans will eat just about anything as will the Guatemalans and the Nicaraguans but the Costa Ricans are more picky. The only offal that you will find regularly on the table is tripe and tongue. All the rest is looked down upon as peasant food and even the peasants won't admit that they eat it.

Edited by Tropicalsenior
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10 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Yet it looks like poached chicken?

 

Steam oven!  300f steam bake x 9 min. Steam broil 500f x 3 min to brown the bread crumbs

Edited by gfweb (log)
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14 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

The Bun Cups with Minced Pork and Vegetables intrigue me. They must be steamed since they don't, as a rule, bake their breads. But they have such a uniform golden color. Do they have some sort of flavoring in the dough? Have you any idea how they are formed?

 

After exhaustive investigations and torturing of suspects, I can now elucidate.

 

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The buns are a feature of Northern Chinese cuisine and are known as 窝窝头 (wō wō tóu) which means nest-like things. They are made from corn, sorghum or millet flour. I think the ones I ate were millet. They also contain brown sugar which may contribute to the colour, although I didn't find them particularly sweet. They are, as I suspected, formed by hand by pressing the thumbs into a ball of dough to make the requisite shape, then steamed.

I bought some this morning and am now thinking what I can fill them with. The possibilities are endless.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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for date night tonight, we went to The Gold Mirror - 800 Taraval Street (18th Avenue) in the Inner Parkside neighborhood of San Francisco

 

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roasted artichoke hearts, parmigianno-reggiano, olio nuevo

 

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avocado stuffed with Dungeness crab meat, lettuce and Thousand Island dressing

 

not the greatest of pictures but it was awesome

 

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scallops, shallots, wine sauce, spinach

 

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veal sweetbreads, braised veal, porcini and button mushrooms

 

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panettone bread pudding, chilled zabaglione

 

not bad; think old school Italian meets New Jersey

Edited by ProfessionalHobbit (log)
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@liuzhou

Thank you. I don't know why these intrigue me so much but they do. I guess, like you, I can see endless possibilities and they fit so well into my favorite food group, the sandwich. With your information I went to dear old Google and found these. The first is a recipe, sort of, for corn cakes, free formed. The Second is a good description and an explanation of their history as street food. The really interesting item is a picture of a type of cast iron mold on which they are cooked. From the picture that you showed us on the banquet photo I suspect that something like this was used to make those. I'm going to dust off my bamboo steamer and see what I can come up with. They will have to be corn because I don't think I have even a prayer of finding the sorghum. The combination of corn and brown sugar should duplicate that color perfectly. I make your Rou jia mo all the time. We love them.

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14 hours ago, Paul Bacino said:

Bryan,

 

A personal friend!!

 

http://www.flannerybeef.com/

Thank you for the link. If it is true, that we eat first with our eyes, this site is a real feast. I only wish that I were close enough to take advantage of it.

I do have to admit that at first sight, I had a senior moment. I missed the link completely. My first impression was that you were raising your own beef and I thought OMG, he has broken my father's first rule of raising livestock. You never name the animals that you raise for food. It brought back memories of the time that we ate Charlie, my sister’s prize 4H steer. None of us had much appetite for beef that winter.

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11 hours ago, gfweb said:

Pimenton roast chicken with soubise and veg

Soubise has flashed on and off my radar screen for decades. Perhaps this is the push I need to give it a go. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I started my Saint Patrick's dinner yesterday. I used a homemade corned beef recipe that I have had a lot of success with. Corned beef is totally unheard of in Costa Rica so it is homemade or nothing. I love it so much that I make it at least two or three times a year.

My biggest problem has been finding the meat that I need. The only type of cattle raised here are a big Brahma cross and they are all pasture-raised. The meat is lean and stringy and they always cut the brisket into small strips to be used for soup. To get a brisket you have to go to a slaughterhouse and buy the full brisket. Recently, I found a cut of meat that is not sold in the supermarkets or in the 'boutique butcher' shops. It is considered peasant food and it is wonderful. It is called giba (HEE-bah) and it is the hump of the Brahma bull. It's nice and marbled and very tender. They only sell it in the small local butcher shops and usually they have to order it for you.

My two pound piece of meat ready to go.

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In the brine.

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Only 2 weeks to wait but it's going to be worth it.

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6 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

 I missed the link completely. My first impression was that you were raising your own beef and I thought OMG, he has broken my father's first rule of raising livestock. You never name the animals that you raise for food. It brought back memories of the time that we ate Charlie, my sister’s prize 4H steer. None of us had much appetite for beef that winter.

 

My late wife's stepson (previous relationship) raised a steer for 4H one year, which had unnaturally short legs (think bovine Dachshund). They named it "Ground Beef." 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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