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Dinner 2018


liuzhou
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Thai fish cakes with spicy peanut sauce.  The peanut sauce is that ugly blob next to the beans.  What I really like is the cilantro microgreens that are on the fish cakes, a lot  have the coriander seeds attached.  I buy them at the market from this fellow who grows various types including basil.20181001_194227.thumb.jpg.949c6730605d60ed1cf11db06ca211fb.jpg

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21 minutes ago, heidih said:

oohh I like the seed heads attached - cool vendor. The undeveloped seed heads are the essence of the herb. 

 

It's a treat biting into the seeds.   Different from the cilantro itself, almost lemony.

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For some reason, I bought 2, 2 pound packages of P.E.I. mussels, but when it came time to cook them, I realized that was just too much and I only cooked half of them for dinner. I still had a 2 pound surplus, that needed to be dealt with, and decided to steam the second batch open and make a garlicky and hot tomato pan sauce to serve them with, over pasta.  A small portion of garden tomato sauce, plenty of home grown garlic, plus a generous portion of homemade bomba Calabrese and a big splash of dry sherry brought it together nicely, and we had mussels two nights in a row. I listened carefully, but did not hear a single complaint.

HC

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The cruellest ordeal  I was put though during my primary and secondary education was the regular serving up of liver and onions at what we called "school dinner" which was lunch in the canteen.  This dish consisted of liver of unknown origin, unseasoned and  boiled to death then drowned in an onion "sauce" powerfully seasoned with charcoal. And that is me being polite.

I didn't eat liver from the day I left school at 18 and headed to university until many, many years later after I arrived in China. One day, dining with friends and being somewhat distracted, I grabbed something nearby with my chopsticks and absent-mindedly put it into my mouth. It was delicious, so I had some more. Naturally, I enquired as to what this might be. Chinese liver and onions!

 

Rather than boil it overnight as my school canteen apparently did, the onions were just nicely caramelised and the thinly sliced liver was melting in the mouth from a rapid, brief toss in the wok with green onions and red chillies.

 

After that,  I often ordered it in restaurants around town. Always delicious.

 

Then, one day, I thought "What would happen if I tried to recreate my school child nightmare dish, but using Chinese techniques." Damn! I liked the results and have cooked and eaten it many times since, Including this evening.

Pig liver thinly sliced. Red onion thinly sliced. Onions fried slowly in the wok until just beginning to caramelise. Liver added along with any blood. Fried at high heat for one minute and served with thinly sliced cabbage fried in bacon fat with chillies and buttery rough mash.

 

Not the prettiest dish you'll have seen, but very tasty if I say so myself, which I do.

 

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Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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With all due respect...yuck. I loathe liver, in any fashion except I WILL eat pate. As long as it's not too liver-heavy. A nd I'll eat foie gras in sauces, etc.; not by itself.

 

I hereby bequeath to you all my share of liver in the world. 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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12 minutes ago, kayb said:

I hereby bequeath to you all my share of liver in the world. 

 Thank you. Thank you. Like @liuzhouI love liver and onions. I did spend much of my childhood eating school dinners in the UK just like him but I don’t ever remember acquiring a dislike for any of them. Perhaps I have a very selective memory.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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28 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Properly cooked calves liver (seared, med-med/rare in the middle) is a fantastic thing.

 

De-glazed with good balsamic and onions, a bit of rosemary or thyme. 

 

Mmmm.

 

Agree, but I can't get calves liver here. Or rosemary. Or thyme.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Football feast:

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Habanero Cheddar, Stilton w/ mango and ginger, Cheddar, dry salami, Double Gloucestershire with onion and chive and Drunken Goat.  With assorted crackers.

 

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Pretzel bites (from Costco) stuffed with Blue Moose Red Pepper Artichoke Cheddar dip (don’t know if “red pepper” referred to bell pepper or cayenne, but I couldn’t taste either – YAY!) and heated in the CSO.  In the bowl are Romano and sour dough cheese crisps from Aldi. 

 

My mother is coming home from rehab tomorrow so on Sunday Mr. Kim, Jess and I went to Capt. Billy’s at Pope's Creek in MD  for crabs.  Cream of crab soup and hushpuppies:

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Crabs and shrimp:

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Last night - The Salad:

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Swedish meatballs and egg noodles:

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Roasted Brussels sprouts:

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Slightly overcooked.  I love the flavor of roasted sprouts, but haven’t ever had much luck with that method.  My usual method of cooking Brussels sprouts (as taught to me by Collette) is to steam until not quite done, then cut in half and sauté in VERY hot butter just before serving.  Since you can do the first step a good while before sautéing, this method is very forgiving, and the timing is easy. 

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Fried potatoes (I had part of a russet potato left over from an earlier project today), celery pickled in fish sauce, spinach ohitashi and beef tataki with ponzu sauce. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Neapolitan style pizza:

 

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I said "style".  Having eaten in Naples I would sooner eat week old rice or garlic six months in oil.  Not for nothing is Naples called the Calcutta of Europe, no aspersions on Calcutta of India.  In Naples I observed they didn't wash glassware between patrons.  And yes, I almost died.  OK, slight exaggeration, it was in Kenya I almost died.  It was after dining in Naples that I wished I'd died.

 

Sorry.

 

Pizza was excellent, baked just short of four minutes.  Bottom blackened and crisp.  This was retarded Modernist Bread French Lean Dough to which I'd added a shot of diastatic malt.  I find French Lean Dough makes more than acceptable pizza, while Modernist Bread Neapolitan Pizza Dough makes atrocious bread.  Your mileage may vary.

 

Anyhow it was good.

 

 

 

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After a late and quite big lunch I could only manage a bowl of noodle soup, but what a good soup it was. Saw a queue so I poked my head through to see. A tray of offal was the first thing I saw, and boiled duck being sliced. Using a translation app to ask if it was duck or chicken, the answer was duck. One employee could speak enough English and communication quickly escalated and much much more interesting. Now I know why there was a queue. Will probably return tonight for other dishes.

 

Night market food stall.

 

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