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liuzhou

Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

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8 hours ago, mm84321 said:

Roasted Brussels sprouts, burrata cheese, bread, and a glass of red wine.

No Popeye’s chicken?

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Happy St. Patrick's day ...

 

WP_20180317_19_00_09_Rich.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Tonight, took this fellow:

 

grouper.thumb.jpg.a31421016ff2609ff6b3fb5883b4f9e4.jpg

Yellow Croaker (大黄鱼 dà huáng yú)

 

... de-scaled, de-finned and gutted him, then fried him otherwise whole with ginger and garlic. Added Shaoxing wine, 豆瓣酱 dòu bàn jiàng (Chilli Bean Sauce) and briefly braised in the sauce. Added scallions. Stir fried some:

 

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Golden Bamboo Shoots (金竹笋 jīn zhú sǔn)

 

Served with rice.

fish1.thumb.jpg.84a50a6494154ea2b1c1c835162fcdae.jpg

 

fish2.thumb.jpg.0dc79c466900d456a721de39ecce1c26.jpg


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Posted (edited)

Dinner the last couple of nights has been steak flavoured 

Porterhouse with Zucchini fries (parmesan blanket) and Broc.

 

20180316_185202.thumb.jpg.b62ffc5896897329d6c20ce382d478ef.jpg

 

Porterhouse with Jalepeno Slaw and a Mushroom cream sauce. 

 

20180317_180736.thumb.jpg.fb1905b6d069754eaa29fdbf22d7c6ff.jpg

 

Yeah I put the Topper as a Bottom. 

It looks, as previously mentioned, like cat puke. 

 

20180317_184630.thumb.jpg.df0a95136ac672084f4530185dcaf1bb.jpg

 

Edit: I was going to leave it there as the meals are boring but some of you care about the details! I was playing with what to cook the steak in, the first was rubbed with Oo after coming to room temp and then 3 mins each side left alone. The second was fried in browned butter after temp, and basted throughout its 3 mins each side. Both were medium, I prefered the second one. 

 

Couldn't get an 'inside shot' I'm teased enough for my photograph taking, think I would loose an arm if I tried a mid meal picture :).


Edited by CantCookStillTry (log)
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2 hours ago, Duvel said:

Happy St. Patrick's day ...

 

WP_20180317_19_00_09_Rich.jpg

0

I'm not much of a beer drinker but I sure could take a big bite out of that muffin.  It looks sooo good!

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Ham/venison meatloaf last night.

 

IMG_4261.jpg.81317edd2b02b7eba2bf8e3b47e03528.jpg

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@Shelby

 

is that " Stuffing "  w your ML ?

 

nice.  BigTime nice.

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10 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Shelby

 

is that " Stuffing "  w your ML ?

 

nice.  BigTime nice.

Yes--guilty pleasure.  I love Stove Top Stuffing.

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1 minute ago, Shelby said:

Yes--guilty pleasure.  I love Stove Top Stuffing.

Stove Top savory herbs with sage sausage, cooked diced onion and apples.

Long cooked green beans.

Mashed potatoes and gravy.......

I think I know what I am having for dinner tonight,  Minus the meatloaf.:P

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Shelby said:

Yes--guilty pleasure.  I love Stove Top Stuffing.

 

The family used to love it. Its quite salty so I'd cube some russet potato pretty small and precook in the water, adding the mix straight into that with water as needed. With scallions and/or cooked sausage - a "bowl meal"


Edited by heidih (log)
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Some meals from this week.  Tuesday, roasted provencal chicken with mashed potatoes and broccoli

 

5aad459ec793d_provencalchicken.thumb.jpg.15adc643dd1fffeec8ef6f5ae55bfeb4.jpg

 

Wednesday Thai flavored salmon cakes

 

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Thursday scallop rolls with bacon browned butter

 

5aad45a6d359f_scalloproll.thumb.jpg.da8fbcaf8cba18d890d78e8bd5d1bc04.jpg

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It is Saturday. It's time for some delightful Persian cuisine for an early evening before hitting the night spots  :B

 

- Crudités

A whole array of veggies and white cheese and hot freshly made Persian bread with a side of a cucumber yogurt Mast-o-Khiar (Cucumber Yoghurt).

The star of the show is freshly picked Basil sprigs instead of the ubiquitous Mint sprigs in Levantine restaurants.

 

P6tVn1w.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

- Persian Bread

 

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- Starters

 

Zertono Gerdo

Salad: Walnuts - Garlic - Mint Leaves - Dried Thyme - Pomegrenate

 

Ed2etyv.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Halim Bademjan

Eggplant - Onions - Chickpeas - Lentils - Walnuts

 

wArPH7T.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

- Main Course

 

Fesenjoon:

Chicken - Walnuts - Pomegrenade

 

Ghormeh Sabzi:

Lamb - Leeks - Coriander - Ref Beans - Vegs

 

 

xNBPl99.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tikkeh Masti: (Lamb Fillet Charcoal Grill)

 

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- Dessert

 

Here comes the bride, all dressed in white

Sweetly, serenely, in soft glowing light.

 

Faloodeh with Bastani Sonnati: Persian ancient frozen vermicelli dessert topped with Persian Saffron Clotted Cream Ice Cream to die for.

The Ceremonial comes with two glass Carafe. One filled with Rose Water and the second one with fresh Lemon Juice.

These are poured on the Frozen Vermicelli before you mix the whole lot and try to avoid the pesky flying spoons militarized by the powers that be.

 

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Just a simple Persian early dinner. 

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Posted (edited)

@Nicolai Looks amazing. You know it's a real-deal persian meal (unintentional rhyme) when you got half a garden worth of herbs on the table.

 

 

BIalys and un-pureed fasole batuta + sour cream.

IMG_20180223_203553.thumb.jpg.23535a2da31f49abdf0715c9b190c498.jpgIMG_20180223_203135.thumb.jpg.30e9a9ba3b1ff30e7ecc7f3c508d1e2b.jpg


Edited by shain (log)
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A common fish in north-west Europe. It was slashed deeply, filled with dill, lemon slices and oven roasted.

w4QGRmO.jpg

 

I prefer brill but it's less and less common only recently. Price of turbot is around 12-15 euros/kg. Brill used to be 7 euros/kg but now costs the same as turbot!

PWI3xPL.jpg

 

A typical meal in Germany's far west, all-the-way-to-the-border west. Most simple: mashed potatoes, apple sauce and blood sausage. With copious amounts of either Altbier or Kölsch alongside depending on where you eat it. Mine was a Bock beer. What do you see when you look up and down? That's the name of this food. Pretty sure Duvel recognises it at once.

rHfaNou.jpg

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52 minutes ago, BonVivant said:

A typical meal in Germany's far west, all-the-way-to-the-border west. Most simple: mashed potatoes, apple sauce and blood sausage. With copious amounts of either Altbier or Kölsch alongside depending on where you eat it. Mine was a Bock beer. What do you see when you look up and down? That's the name of this food. Pretty sure Duvel recognises it at once.

rHfaNou.jpg

 

"Himmel un Ääd" (Heaven and earth) - very tasty !

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Posted (edited)

In response to Kim’s post.  

 

I was going to guess the salad too.  Maybe why I’ve never won the lottery 


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)

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Posted (edited)

Even if I didn't have an Irish ancestor, I'd still make corned beef at least once a year. We like it so much.  My great great grandfather was born in (now) Northern Ireland almost 200 years ago.  He was married in Ohio and settled about 50 miles south of here in Kansas. He is buried at Trading Post and he may have never had corned beef or even heard of it but it is an American Irish tradition and we are glad it is.  Someday I will get soda bread down right and I came closer this year that any but I still have a ways to go before I am totally happy with the outcome. I tried a recipe called Irish Apple Pie. I don't know if that is a real thing or not but I wanted to give it a try.  If it is a real thing, it was a lot of work for someone who may not have had electric kitchen gadgets. I may have made meringue before but I don't remember when. It got a little brown on top.  The first piece out of the pan is always the messy one.  I made two sauces for the corned beef. One was a mustard and beer sauce and the other was sour cream and horseradish.

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Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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2 hours ago, BonVivant said:

A common fish in north-west Europe. It was slashed deeply, filled with dill, lemon slices and oven roasted.

w4QGRmO.jpg

 

 

It looks unhappy.

 

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Posted (edited)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

 

1D0D3CFF-DC0B-409B-A8F4-A14940DF6B80.thumb.jpeg.0668244f804b0766712fe0f689a39ef0.jpeg

 

 


Edited by robirdstx (log)
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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

It looks unhappy.

 

I'm pretty sure I would too, if I'd been slashed deeply and stuffed into an oven. :P

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Last night:

 

Dinner03172018.png

 

 

Unremarkable except for the potatoes.*  New technique informed by three authors.  Fluffiest potatoes I have made.  Proud that an entire dishwasher was devoted to preparing one portion of my mashed potatoes.

 

 

*and for the fact that I did not spill any peas.

 

 

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It was a most excellent dinner.

st.pats1.JPG.c299e392d47fbf10343eef17b70ec7ab.JPG

 

The brisket was only four pounds, not the five I'd guessed. I cut it in two pieces and plunked it in the IP. Ninety minutes pressure cook, 10 minutes NPR, dipped out a few ladlefulls of broth to cook the cabbage because there was no room, added the potatoes and carrots. Put it back on for another 10 minutes, another 10 NPR. Veggies probably could have done with seven or eight minutes, but they weren't harmed. Meanwhile, I cooked the cabbage in the stock on top of the stove just until it still had some body to it, but was perfectly tender.

 

Corned beef was a tad salty, which surprised me, as it was the Ruhlman brine, which last year was perfect. May have been the fact I left it 10 days, rather than the week he recommends? I thought when one reached equilibrium there was no corresponding increase in saltiness for length of time brining. Am I wrong?

 

Nevertheless, it'll make fine sandwiches and hash. Looking forward to both.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

It was a most excellent dinner.

st.pats1.JPG.c299e392d47fbf10343eef17b70ec7ab.JPG

 

The brisket was only four pounds, not the five I'd guessed. I cut it in two pieces and plunked it in the IP. Ninety minutes pressure cook, 10 minutes NPR, dipped out a few ladlefulls of broth to cook the cabbage because there was no room, added the potatoes and carrots. Put it back on for another 10 minutes, another 10 NPR. Veggies probably could have done with seven or eight minutes, but they weren't harmed. Meanwhile, I cooked the cabbage in the stock on top of the stove just until it still had some body to it, but was perfectly tender.

 

Corned beef was a tad salty, which surprised me, as it was the Ruhlman brine, which last year was perfect. May have been the fact I left it 10 days, rather than the week he recommends? I thought when one reached equilibrium there was no corresponding increase in saltiness for length of time brining. Am I wrong?

 

Nevertheless, it'll make fine sandwiches and hash. Looking forward to both.

 

 

 

 

According to 23andme I am mostly Irish/British.  I wish I could stomach corned beef.  I can't.

 

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