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joiei

Hummus

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I make hummus but I am bored with my recipe. I can make a meal out of vegies and some excellent hummus.  I need a recipe for a better hummus than what I have.  So you all can help me.  This is part of my new diet designs.  First question, a source for quality dried garbanzos.  I live in Oklahoma and it is winter, the chance for fresh beans is not a happening thing. Do you cook your beans in stock or water?  I have never peeled the cooked beans, is it worth my time?  All suggestions are greatly appreciated.  


Edited by joiei (log)

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More of our members will chime in i'm sure, but it will help to know what your current recipe is. 

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2 minutes ago, caroled said:

More of our members will chime in i'm sure, but it will help to know what your current recipe is. 

Canned beans that have been rinsed and dried, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, water, salt.  Food processor.  

 

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That helps. Sometimes I add some ground cumin to mine. Other times roasted red peppers. and or smoked paprika. I've also bought some brands that included beets, or carrots ( in separate containers of course)that were pureed along with the beans.  It's also good made with black beans, with a bit of fresh cilantro mixed in at the end.  I too look forward to suggestions from others. 

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I trust Ottolenghi's thinking and recipes.  https://food52.com/recipes/22888-yotam-ottolenghi-sami-tamimi-s-basic-hummus

 

If you google his name there are variations. I personally find that I get bored with a flavored one and prefer to add in things like pesto and red pepper/eggplant paste (name escapes me) when serving. Good olives and capers make me happy as well. 

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Mine is pretty basic like Ottolenghi's except I don't use baking soda when cooking the dried beans.   I find it makes the finished product a little pasty.   I blend in a food pro. a long time to get a smooth texture.  Also use cumin for flavor.  It's what I grew up with so it just taste right 

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I use a very similar recipe. The devil is in the detail (proportions of lemon, garlic, tahini, water, etc). I make it by taste rather than by quantities from recipe as it depends on the ripeness and juiciness of the lemons. I also prefer a less thick texture, which is achieved by adding water and blending until the desired consistency is achieved. Like @scubadoo97, I add freshly roasted and ground cumin to taste.

 

Try adding a small pinch of cayenne pepper, which is not enough to make it hot but plenty enough to make it interesting.


Edited by nickrey added @ to name (log)
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Some favorite add-ins:

 

  • roasted red pepper
  • roasted garlic instead of raw
  • artichoke hearts
  • All different kinds of olives
  • Sun-dried tomatoes

 

 

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This is my go to recipe.  The devil IS in the details.  This recipe will make the smoothest hummus you have ever had.  

If you want to go all out, I recommend dried chick peas for the best flavour.

 

Soak 150g or 3/4 c chick peas in cold water overnight.

Drain and put peas in a pot and cover with two inches of water.  Bring to a boil and cook until almost soft but not quite done.  This makes taking the skin off easier.

Drain saving the cooking water.

Put the peas in a large bowl of cold water and rub them between your palms to remove the skins.  Yes, that's right.  The skins will float so you can skim them off and replenish the water as needed. Once the peas are skinned put them back in the cooking water and simmer until very soft.  Drain once again but save the cooking water.

Put 4 cloves of minced garlic, 3 Tablespoons Tahini, 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 2 teaspoons ground cumin seeds that have been toasted.  Whiz until blended.  Add the peas along with 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, 3 tablespoons olive oil and 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or crushed red pepper.  Blend until smooth adding the cooking water as needed to get the texture you like.  Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking.

 

You could use a blender also but you will probably need to add a little more cooking water so your mixture does not cease up the blender.

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Yes skinning the chickpeas does make a difference but I'm often too lazy.  Your method of removal sounds good 

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It does work well because the peas are more firm so you can give them a good rub without crushing them.

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On 12/26/2017 at 9:25 PM, joiei said:

I make hummus but I am bored with my recipe. I can make a meal out of vegies and some excellent hummus.  I need a recipe for a better hummus than what I have.  So you all can help me.  This is part of my new diet designs.  First question, a source for quality dried garbanzos.  I live in Oklahoma and it is winter, the chance for fresh beans is not a happening thing. Do you cook your beans in stock or water?  I have never peeled the cooked beans, is it worth my time?  All suggestions are greatly appreciated.  

 

Rancho Gordo has excellent dried garbanzos IMO

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For over thirty years, I've been following this recipe and am happy with it.

 

These days, I have to make my own tahini as it's unavailable here. Chinese sesame paste is not substitute!

 

5a447118c8b4e_hummusingredients.thumb.jpg.89269f6739f3e502194f04a0468d9d3b.jpg

 

hummus.thumb.jpg.ff29a47d925ae19de8a7868d5b65e016.jpg

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8 hours ago, liuzhou said:

For over thirty years, I've been following this recipe and am happy with it.

 

These days, I have to make my own tahini as it's unavailable here. Chinese sesame paste is not substitute!

 

5a447118c8b4e_hummusingredients.thumb.jpg.89269f6739f3e502194f04a0468d9d3b.jpg

 

hummus.thumb.jpg.ff29a47d925ae19de8a7868d5b65e016.jpg

That's a good recipe.  I'd support looking at what is available in tahini. The wrong paste can ruin the recipe.

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Shain should chime in here - but I will offer a few thoughts...

 

Try to get your hands on Smoked Dried Chickpeas.  We have brought them back a number of times from trips to Israel and they make the ULTIMATE hummus!

 

Besides that, garlic confit instead of raw makes a big difference, as does high quality olive oil.  Other than that, I am a bit of a purist; though sometimes I will add some roasted hot peppers to it.

 

 

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On 12/26/2017 at 10:46 PM, heidih said:

Ottolenghi's recipe has an enormous amount of tahini in it compared to other recipes I've got, I've always shied away from it for fear that it had metric-to-imperial conversion issues. Is there really over a cup of tahini to 1.25 cups dried chickpeas?

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18 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

This is my go to recipe.  The devil IS in the details.  This recipe will make the smoothest hummus you have ever had.  

If you want to go all out, I recommend dried chick peas for the best flavour.

 

Soak 150g or 3/4 c chick peas in cold water overnight.

Drain and put peas in a pot and cover with two inches of water.  Bring to a boil and cook until almost soft but not quite done.  This makes taking the skin off easier.

Drain saving the cooking water.

Put the peas in a large bowl of cold water and rub them between your palms to remove the skins.  Yes, that's right.  The skins will float so you can skim them off and replenish the water as needed. Once the peas are skinned put them back in the cooking water and simmer until very soft.  Drain once again but save the cooking water.

Put 4 cloves of minced garlic, 3 Tablespoons Tahini, 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 2 teaspoons ground cumin seeds that have been toasted.  Whiz until blended.  Add the peas along with 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, 3 tablespoons olive oil and 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or crushed red pepper.  Blend until smooth adding the cooking water as needed to get the texture you like.  Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking.

 

You could use a blender also but you will probably need to add a little more cooking water so your mixture does not cease up the blender.

I will definitely give this recipe a try.  The portions sound very close to what I use.  I have Aleppo pepper but never thought of adding it to my hummus.  

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Chiming in...

Firstly, as for Ottolenghi & Sami recpie, knowing their work, I'm sure it will yield good results, but there are a few things that I think are not ideal. The amount of tahini is on the high end of the spectrum, but not unheard of. The amount of baking soda is also high. I'd also recommend that you take a look at Kenji's article about hummus in Serious Eats. Hes explanations are very good and he's recipe is not far from my own.

 

My perspective is focused around hummus as is popular in Israel and Palestine, I'm sadly less familiar with hummus as common in the neighboring countries. One should remember that it's a very old dish, and there are endless versions.

In Israel (and as far as I know also the surrounding countries), hummus is not "creatively" flavored. Hummus with beats, roasted peppers, sundried tomates, etc, while often very tasty, is not considered hummus by Israelis (and there are people with quite a strong feeling about it :)). 

Garlic, cumin, chili and sometimes a small amount of cooked onion or carrots are the only flavoring I ever saw added, and all in a nuanced fashion. A common mistake is to add a large amount of those - hummus should (usually) be mellow, smooth, creamy and rich in both flavor and texture.  No olive oil in hummus, all the fat should come from tahini. The oil goes only on top.

Lemon juice is another important ingredient and it's amount varies. I prefer my hummus with just enough acidity to break the richness, but not to taste sour at all. Some likes it much more tangy. A rule of thumb is that the warmer a hummus is to be served, the less lemon it needs. A warm and acidic hummus is quite bad. Often a garlic-lemon sauce is served along the hummus or poured on top of it.

And if talking about temperature, hummus should never be served below room temp, and some styles (often more modern ones) are served warm. I like mine best when it's warm.

The chickpeas - the most important thing is to cook them well and then cook them some more. Let the heat make the hard work for the blender. When cooked well enough, you can make a decently smooth hummus even with a mortar and pestle. It's really best to use dry and not canned, but if you have to use canned you will need to cook them some more until they are as soft as described. When using dried, soak them well and cook with lightly salted water. A pressure cooker does wonders but otherwise add a small amount of baking powder. Use the smallest cultivar of chickpeas that you can find. Peeling the chickpeas is usually not necessary (think of the shops selling gallons a day). If cooked enough, the peel will mostly dissolve. Very large chickpeas might have an overly thick peel, I'll try to find some other types.

Blend the chickpeas while warm, and use their cooking water.

Add tahini, I like mine not too heavy on it - about one half of the chickpeas dry weight or one thourth of their cooked weight. Some like much more. Choosing the right tahini is a whole other story, but make sure to used one made of hulled tahini (mot wholemeal). It should be nutty, sweet and not bitter. Add enough water for the hummus to be as thick as a Greek yogurt, it should flow a little. Add lemon to taste (when at serving temp), as well as salt, and little garlic. Cumin and chili are optional.

The common toppings around here are whole chickpeas (get some out of the pot before they get too soft), ful (cooked fava beans) with plenty of cumin, boiled egg, tahini sauce, chopped or sliced raw onion, ground spiced meat, pan fried mushrooms, pine nuts.

Make sure to have some good pita bread. Pita chips are not usually served with hummus in Israel. I like pitas that are fluffy and soft (more like a steamed bun then a tortilla). Naan bread also works great.

If you are tired of hummus, look into masabacha and ful medames.

 

So my recipe:

Yields two servings when without toppings.

- 160 g small dry chickpeas, soaked overnight

- 1 teaspoon salt + more to taste

- 90 g tahini (stir well before use)

- 60-75 g lemon juice (2-3 tablespoons)

- 1 clove of garlic (not a large one)

- 1 teaspoon cumin

 

- Cook chickpeas with salt until falling apart tender.

- Drain and let chill to serving temp (warm). Reserve cooking water.

- Add tahini and blend smooth, adding cooking water until it is as thick as Greek yogurt.

- Add lemon garlic, cumin. Maybe more salt or a touch of chili.

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That’s interesting when you say no olive oil in the mix, just for garnish.  And, cooking the chick peas to the point the skins almost dissolve!  Will have to try both of those.  Thanks for your input from the heart of hummus country:B

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3 hours ago, shain said:

In Israel (and as far as I know also the surrounding countries), hummus is not "creatively" flavored. 

Oh bless your heart for saying that. I was going to, but I'm sure it will go over much better coming from you, even though we're both coming from the same place.

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i've tried multiple different chickpeas (canned and dry).

MOST flavorful, in my opinion, canned Goya chickpeas

 

i've tried multiple different tahini's

Most flavorful, in my opinion, Krinos Tahini

 

the balance of salt, acid (lemon juice) and garlic is crucial to elevate the dish. Most folks dont add enough lemon juice.

finally, hummus tastes infinitely better on day two.

 

just my opinion. hope it helps you make a tastier dish!

 

 

 

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Here is an image of a few chickpea varieties, for hummus, the small "Bulgarian" on the top right is preferred by many, the large variety on the bottom right is not very good for hummus, since its peel is thick and it is slow to cook.

 

This is my favorite tahini - Al Karwan, seems to be rather costly on Amazon. Al Arz is also quite nice, but more expensive. Achva tahini is sold for a better price, it's very common is Israel, and quite OK.

 

16 hours ago, Heartsurgeon said:

hummus tastes infinitely better on day two

Lets agree to disagree :)

 

 


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