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gulfporter

Do You Have a Preferred Baking Method for Cheesecakes?

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I'm bringing a cheesecake to a NYE party.  It's been awhile since I baked one.  In searching for cheesecake recipes (I'll likely go with a cranberry-orange one), it appears there are 3 common baking methods: 

1.  Bake xx minutes in xxx degree oven.

2.  Bake xx minutes in a xxx degree oven, then turn off the heat and leave cheesecake in oven for xx minutes.

3.  Bake in a water bath.  

Since I have no experience with my new springform pan that I purchased here in Mexico (no name brand), I am adverse to the water bath method just in case the pan has issues.  

Of the other two methods, do you prefer one over the other?

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From my favourite cheesecake book - Cheesecake Extraordinaire

 

Bake at 350 for 15 minutes then turn down to 180 for about 45 minutes or until center no longer looks wet or shiny. Remove from oven, run knife around the inside edge of pan to prevent cracking and place bake in turned off oven for 1 hour.

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I have this book and recommend it highly. I can attest to the cranberry orange recipe in it, it's very nice!  I'm not sure if you can get cranberry juice concentrate there (it's hard for me, even here in cranberry country!), but if you can; do try the recipe. 

 

Depending on the recipe I either bake at a low temp, leave it in the turned-off oven for an hour and then take it out to cool; or bake in a water bath. 

 

You can always wrap the springform in heavy duty foil if you decide to use the water bath.  Wrapping the bottom and going up the sides will prevent water from seeping in the pan.

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@gulfporter, my personal preference is to not bake cheesecake in a water bath. I enjoy the slight browning and drier, slightly lighter texture that results from a straight bake. Your cheesecake is more likely to develop cracks with this method, but if food snobs are coming to dinner, I cover those up with a fruit topping. 


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes delete whitespace (log)
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Used the '"leave it in a turned off oven"' method .  Got some cracks....I always do!  

 

But this time I did something about them....found this on youtube and must say mine now looks beautiful, too.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Wg_PVc84Zk

 

 

 

 

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You kinda have to think of cheesecake as a custard. It's set with eggs, so it needs to be baked low and slow. And not overbaked, which I think some people have issues with since it may not look set and keep baking it.

For Christmas, I made a goat cheese cheesecake, and I baked it at 350 for 15 mins, turned it down to 275 and baked about 45 mins more (this was a small 7"). It still had a soft jiggle in the middle. I left it in the oven with the door ajar until it cooled. Then ran a knife around the edge. The texture was perfect. 

 

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