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liuzhou

Dining with the Dong

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Thank you.  It has been an incredible view into a culture completely unknown to me.  Thank you for the journey.  I am anticipating more  of your travels.

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SO much to see and eat in China...SO little time. Thank you for your travels and sharing. :wub:

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You see a side of China that very few Westerners will ever see. Thank you for showing us your China.

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On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 11:22 AM, IowaDee said:

I'm thinking about having one of those DNA tests done.  As far as I know, I'm 100% WASP but somehow I feel that there may be just a single Dong gene lurking within.  Everything you post about them just makes me feel good.  

 

Do it!  According to 23andme I am 0.1% Yakut, a Siberian minority in China.

 

Beautiful travelogue @liuzhou.  Somehow I missed it first time around.

 

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      The rest of my trip can be seen here:
       
       
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