Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Recommended Posts

I like to make roasted eggplant/aubergine for baba gahanouj, bharta (etc.) on coals that impart a wonderful smoky flavour.  I've had good success doing it in a barbecue (actually a Big Green Egg).  So, now that it's winter, I thought "why not try it in the fireplace, after the fire has burnt down to glowing coals?" I cut a few slits in the eggplant so that it wouldn't explode, did NOT wrap it in foil, thinking that would just seal out the smoky flavour, and popped it into the fireplace (with glass doors) for 15 min.  It came out looking good, perhaps a little under-cooked, but basically OK.  The taste was TERRIBLE -  very strong flavour of fire place ash.  I only had a couple of bites, despite my Methodist ancestors looking disapprovingly over my shoulder, because it really was bad.  So has anyone else tried this?  I'd like to make it work.  Should the eggplant be wrapped in foil? Should I wait until the coals have died down further?  Does it depend on the type of wood? This was mainly aspen - crappy firewood at best, but it was free (Methodist ancestors won this time.).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried it at least once, and have tried it over an open campfire more then once.  I don't recall having problems with an overly ashy taste, but I have often had problems with the whole darned thing collapsing so much that there was only a crispy shell!  Heat too high, or cooked too long, I figured. If you laid the eggplant on the bare coals, I'd suggest putting it in a pan on the coals next time and elevating it slightly.  If you don't want to dirty a pan in the ash, you could make a bowl of that foil. Sorry, I can't guarantee that this will appease your ancestors, since I'm speculating. :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, KootenayCook said:

I like to make roasted eggplant/aubergine for baba gahanouj, bharta (etc.) on coals that impart a wonderful smoky flavour.  I've had good success doing it in a barbecue (actually a Big Green Egg).  So, now that it's winter, I thought "why not try it in the fireplace, after the fire has burnt down to glowing coals?" I cut a few slits in the eggplant so that it wouldn't explode, did NOT wrap it in foil, thinking that would just seal out the smoky flavour, and popped it into the fireplace (with glass doors) for 15 min.  It came out looking good, perhaps a little under-cooked, but basically OK.  The taste was TERRIBLE -  very strong flavour of fire place ash.  I only had a couple of bites, despite my Methodist ancestors looking disapprovingly over my shoulder, because it really was bad.  So has anyone else tried this?  I'd like to make it work.  Should the eggplant be wrapped in foil? Should I wait until the coals have died down further?  Does it depend on the type of wood? This was mainly aspen - crappy firewood at best, but it was free (Methodist ancestors won this time.).

 

I sympathize on the Methodist ancestors; I tried to tell my Methodist parents they could send my greens to the starving children, but that was a non-starter.

 

I would see if I could rig some way to elevate the eggplant, obviously in a pan, higher above the coals. Might also have something to do with the amount of ash buildup in your fireplace. Do you have a tripod like one uses over a campfire to suspend a Dutch oven? If so, you could use that without the top. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was the aubergine overly bitter after roasting?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, JohnT said:

Was the aubergine overly bitter after roasting?

 

No, not at all, as I drained off all the liquid.  I also forgot to mention in my original post that I was meticulous about getting the cooked pulp out without any ash or burnt bits of skin. So the acrid flavour wasn't through contamination.

 

@kayb Thanks for the suggestion.  Will try that. I actually put the eggplant in the glowing coals, which is what I've done with the bbq and had good results.  Our fireplace has a grate - I can make sure all the ash is down below and the coals are not touching the eggplant; so no need for a special contraption.

 

I'm thinking it might be the type of wood & will try it again with maple, when the pile in my woodshed gets down that far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I asked about a bitter flavour as you normally get that with an aubergine that is not fresh. They really need to be cooked as soon after harvesting as possible. However, yours, you say, was not. As has been said by @Captain, it really looks like the burnt wood imparted that flavour into yours. I cannot pass comment on your fire wood as you folk use totally different woods than what I would use where I am. However, I do know that certain woods used here in indoor fireplaces for heating, cannot be used for any type of cooking. And never use any type of treated wood for cooking - it will impart a terrible taste to your cooked food and most likely make you very ill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 fireplace (with glass doors) ???? sitting glowing coals>>>

 

Were you smoking the eggplant or burning it?

 

1- Eggplant should not be in direct contact with the heat source, in this case glowing coals.

2- Eggplant should not be in an enclosed glass doors thingy

3- Eggplant should not be cut or scored. Simply pricking with a fork.

4- Never tried it from wood but always from coal and most of the time from a open gas hob flame and some people use the oven grill.

 

For the record, the Baba Ghanouj recipe is unfortunately incorrect as it is using Lemon for sourness.

Eggplant pulp with Tahineh and Lemon++ correct name is Batenjan Mtabal and the full name is Batenjan Mtabal bel Thineh.

Baba Ghanouj is different as the sourness is from Pomegranate juice with Tehinah.

 

Baba Ghanouj translation is Father for Baba and Baba is also used as sometimes derogatory and some time in a patronizing manner.

Ghanouj is what you say to a pampered child. Pamper=Spoil=Cuddle

Ghanouj is not someone name (I guess I need to correct Wikipedia on that).

Baba Ghanouj correct translation is a Father's cuddle.

 

Today, people use either names for the Lemony version which is a sad state of affairs. I prefer the original with Pomegranate freshly squeezed juice.

Two completely different tastes and people started substituting Lemon instead of Pomegranate for the simple lack and difficulty, cost and sourcing Pomegranate in times gone by.

A plea to all readers, do remember that such recipes were created in ancient or old times where cooking had to follow the seasons harvest and location. Food recipes were created during each particular season. Albeit not anymore the case today and substituting elements in a recipe falls under the guise of creativity or sheer incompetence.

 

This is how age old great recipes are expropriated and ruined by neighboring cultures and countries.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2017 at 4:23 AM, Nicolai said:

 fireplace (with glass doors) ???? sitting glowing coals>>>

 

Were you smoking the eggplant or burning it?

 

1- Eggplant should not be in direct contact with the heat source, in this case glowing coals.

2- Eggplant should not be in an enclosed glass doors thingy

3- Eggplant should not be cut or scored. Simply pricking with a fork.

4- Never tried it from wood but always from coal and most of the time from a open gas hob flame and some people use the oven grill.

 

For the record, the Baba Ghanouj recipe is unfortunately incorrect as it is using Lemon for sourness.

Eggplant pulp with Tahineh and Lemon++ correct name is Batenjan Mtabal and the full name is Batenjan Mtabal bel Thineh.

Baba Ghanouj is different as the sourness is from Pomegranate juice with Tehinah.

 

Baba Ghanouj translation is Father for Baba and Baba is also used as sometimes derogatory and some time in a patronizing manner.

Ghanouj is what you say to a pampered child. Pamper=Spoil=Cuddle

Ghanouj is not someone name (I guess I need to correct Wikipedia on that).

Baba Ghanouj correct translation is a Father's cuddle.

 

Today, people use either names for the Lemony version which is a sad state of affairs. I prefer the original with Pomegranate freshly squeezed juice.

Two completely different tastes and people started substituting Lemon instead of Pomegranate for the simple lack and difficulty, cost and sourcing Pomegranate in times gone by.

A plea to all readers, do remember that such recipes were created in ancient or old times where cooking had to follow the seasons harvest and location. Food recipes were created during each particular season. Albeit not anymore the case today and substituting elements in a recipe falls under the guise of creativity or sheer incompetence.

 

This is how age old great recipes are expropriated and ruined by neighboring cultures and countries.

 

 

 

Hello- This may be Very OT (and if so please let me know) I really want to cook my eggplant on a gas hob. Could tell me how its done?       

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You just set the purple babe right on the burner grate and let it go - do NOT walk too far away/ turn as lower side gets dark. Do not pierce unless you have a well paid cleaner person ;)


Edited by heidih (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/29/2018 at 4:19 AM, Naftal said:

Hello- This may be Very OT (and if so please let me know) I really want to cook my eggplant on a gas hob. Could tell me how its done?       

Just prick with a fork and torch it on the burner, turning with some tongs for even charring or turn it by the stem.

 

It is advisable to line the hob with Alu foil as the aubergine will release some juice and pieces of charred flesh are bound to fall.

 

You should end up with a completely charred skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By crisw
      I am trying to work on making some chocolates for my diabetic sister. As the sweetener, I used Swerve, an erythritol-based sweetener that supposedly behaves like sugar (and that my sister likes.) I added it to my standard milk chocolate recipe from Chocolate Alchemy- http://chocolatealchemy.com/recipes/dark-milk-chocolate-45 It came out of the melanger fine and set up OK. But, when I went to temper it, it would not melt! Even after an hour at 140F, it was about the consistency of peanut butter. 
       
      Has anyone worked with Swerve and have any successful recipes? Or have any idea why it was so viscous?  The stuff is darned expensive, so I don't want to experiment too much. 
    • By Bernie
      I have a nice recipe for Lamb shanks Rogan Josh. The recipe uses Greek style yogurt and stock along with the various spices and a long slow braise (3 hrs plus)
      7 out of 10 times the result is that the sauce has the appearance of having split the yogurt from the stock.
      It does not seem to affect the flavor at all, its just the appearance.
       
      Is this the result of cooking at too high a temperature at some stage during the cook?
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
    • By Arlene13
      Posted 1 hour ago My truffles are cracking and leaking even when dipped at room temperature. 
      I am so frustrated! Also some centres are too soft to dip unless chilled or frozen, suggestions? Also anyone have a good butterscotch truffle recipe with no icing sugar or cream cheese involved?
      thank you!
    • By pastrygirl
      I have a slab of stone, I think it’s quartz, that I stored in my garage over the summer. The garage is kind of gross and buggy, there used to be a ton of old books in there so there were silverfish and the spiders who eat them. I don’t store paper goods out there but I figured stone would be safe. Yesterday I dusted off the bug poo and dragged the stone into the kitchen. Now I’m noticing tiny little perfections all over it, little spots where the stone has been etched into and catch when I run a fingernail across. I’m pretty sure they weren’t there in May. Is bug poo caustic enough to cause this? Or am I imagining things?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×