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Tuber magnatum

Tuber magnatum

5 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

I was thinking that after inflating it you could displace the air with helium, but I don't know how much the balloon itself weighs so I don't know if that will do the job or not. 

 

One cubic meter helium can lift about 1kg or put another way, one cubic foot of helium lifts  28.2 gms, around an ounce.  I rather suspect a balloon of bread would weigh way too much and presumably it would be porous. Wouldn't it be cool if you could float a pomme soufflee, but that too is way too heavy?  So I am stuck looking for a taffy balloon recipe!

Tuber magnatum

Tuber magnatum

5 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

I was thinking that after inflating it you could displace the air with helium, but I don't know how much the balloon itself weighs so I don't know if that will do the job or not. 

 

One cubic meter helium can lift about 1kg or put another way, one cubic foot of helium lifts  28.2 gms, around an ounce.  I rather suspect a balloon of bread would weigh way too much and presumably it would be porous. Wouldn't it be cool if you could float a pomme soufflee, but that too is way too heavy.  So I am stuck looking for a taffy balloon recipe!

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