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Kasia

My Irish coffee

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My Irish Coffee

 

Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink.


If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum.

Ingredients (for 2 drinks)
300ml of strong, hot coffee
40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey
150ml of 30% sweet cream
4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar
1 teaspoon of caster sugar
4 drops of vanilla essence

Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee.


Enjoy your drink!

 

 

IMG_1113a.jpg


Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

follow me on Facebook and Instagram

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47 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Indeed it is, but I've never seen so much being used, and I spent a lot of time in Ireland when I was younger.

You are probably wright @liuzhou but pls remember that it is called "My Irish coffee" :) and tagged as "dessert"

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Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

follow me on Facebook and Instagram

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This looks absolutely divine.  I am beginning a week of Thanksgiving break and this sounds like the perfect drink for cozy me-time.  Thank you for sharing!

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I'm fond of coffee with Jameson's and Bailey's Irish Cream. Needs nothing else. It will certainly chase the chills.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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i have only ever had Irish coffee at Buena Vista in Francisco. It is such an embedded  experience that I don't think I would attempt it elsewhere :)  

 

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You have to hit th rewind/replay on bottom left

 

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10 hours ago, heidih said:

i have only ever had Irish coffee at Buena Vista in Francisco. It is such an embedded  experience that I don't think I would attempt it elsewhere :)  

 

I watched this piece on CBS Sunday Morning yesterday.  

Put Irish Whiskey on my shopping list.

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21 minutes ago, lindag said:

I watched this piece on CBS Sunday Morning yesterday.  

Put Irish Whiskey on my shopping list.

If I'd watched that on Sunday morning, I'd probably have put the Irish whiskey into my coffee 🙃

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Today I stopped at the liquor store expressly for Irish Whiskey.  I opted for the Tulla more brand.

Then I hotfooted it home to make my first Irish Whiskey!  (Somehow I've never had one before.)

1 teadpoon brown sugar, some hot coffee, the whiskey (large shot) and the cream.  

Oh my,   I may have to have another!

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I remember bringing home a little crock of Tullamore Dew from a trip to Ireland, years ago and I think I still have it somewhere!

 

Apologies if I shared this Irish coffee story before.....My grandmother left Ireland all by herself to come to the US in 1901, at the age of 16.  She was into her 90's when she returned there for the first time on a family vacation and was served Irish coffee for the first.    Nanny took quite a liking to the beverage and asked for one wherever they went. Authentic or not, they apparently pour them for American tourists.

Someone asked her if she'd had Irish coffee when she lived in Ireland.  Her response, "Why sure, child, if they'd had it back then, I never would have left!  :D

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For my Irish Coffee I used some Reddi Whip which was almost gone.

But then I remembered  I had an Isi Whip in the pantry that I got quite a few years ago and had never used!  (I'm not a big dessert person.)

I added my whipping cream and charged it up and now it's ready for the mince that's in the fridge.  The plain cream from the ISI is a bit bland but I have some Torani Vanilla Syrup in the pantry that I usually use for Iced Coffee, I'm thinking it's just the right add-in to sweeten the cream a bit.

I served mine up in one of these.


Edited by lindag (log)

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