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smeems

Need restaurant for my wedding!

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Hi.  I'm brand new to this site.  I used to be on Chowhound but I see now that that site is a mess. I found this site and it looks pretty cool.  The main reason I joined is  I’m looking for recommendations for a restaurant to hold my wedding in March 2018. We were hoping maybe in Brooklyn but we are open to anything interesting. There will be 55-60 people and the ceremony will also be at the restaurant. I’m thinking of a brunch/early afternoon affair, most likely on a weekend. Would love to find a funky/old school/unique/charming type of place for my sweetheart. Inexpensive please! Thank you in advance!

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First, congratulations, and may you have a long and happy marriage! I saw your post on Food Talk Central. You want to spend no more than $65.00-70.00 per person. That can be pretty difficult with large groups in New York, especially if that figure includes alcohol. Also, if the ceremony will be at the restaurant, are you looking for a private room or looking to rent out the entire restaurant?

 

My general feeling is, if your guests are OK with going far south in Brooklyn (e.g., Sheepshead Bay), you'll have a better chance at getting something old-school that's not expensive. I'm not so knowledgeable about this, but I had a very good lunch a few years ago at Vesuvio in Bensonhurst. They're not so cheap but my lunch was certainly less than $65 including a glass of wine and tip but excluding dessert. I'm not sure how much seating they have, but I thought the place had charm. I hope you get some good recommendations.

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I went to a wedding in brooklyn a couple of years ago. 

The restaurant has a big attached outdoor garden which can hold maybe 150 to 200 people. 

It was a very nice wedding. I don't think it was expensive.

In your case, March would be too cold for an outdoor wedding.

 

dcarch


Edited by dcarch (log)

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I have no information to contribute, having never been to Brooklyn, but I have to at least give a warm hello to anyone who chooses a Terry Pratchett character for their username. :)

 

As it happens, I've been reading "Unseen Academicals" aloud to my GF this past few weeks. 

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Thanks for the props on my username.  It's actually a nickname based on my last name that a good friend gave me.  Who is Terry Pratchett?  I really need to know.  What character?  what book?  film?

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1 hour ago, smeems said:

Thanks for the props on my username.  It's actually a nickname based on my last name that a good friend gave me.  Who is Terry Pratchett?  I really need to know.  What character?  what book?  film?

 

Terry Pratchett is an English author, known mainly for the Discworld series. If you do an eG search (top right corner of the page) for Discworld, it's referenced in a number of topics.

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2 hours ago, smeems said:

Thanks for the props on my username.  It's actually a nickname based on my last name that a good friend gave me.  Who is Terry Pratchett?  I really need to know.  What character?  what book?  film?

 

He wrote comedic fantasy novels, but that's like saying Alain Ducasse might know his way around the kitchen. They started as a loving spoof/tribute to the pulp fantasy tales of the 40s, but quickly grew into something entirely other. He has something of the same off-kilter sensibility as Douglas Adams (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy), but with more depth and, thankfully, he was much more prolific. Under all the silliness the Discworld series contains some highly intelligent and impassioned writing, and Pratchett has been described as "the best satirist England has produced since Swift." A.S Byatt, a winner herself, lobbied hard but unsuccessfully to have him shortlisted for the Booker Prize. 

 

The character Natchbull Smeems crops up in one of the late Discworld books, Unseen Academicals, which is set at Unseen University (the Disc's premier school of wizardry). He's the Candle Knave, responsible both for overseeing the candle-making crew and for seeing that all the sconces and chandeliers are fully fitted with candles. 

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