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Raamo

Baking with Myhrvold's "Modernist Bread: The Art and Science"

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Van Over bread made in Thermomix - dough was 24 C in a very short time.

 

 

 

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In the basic sourdough recipe, with the machine mixing instructions, do they clarify what they mean by "mix to medium gluten development?"

 

I use a 6qt KA mixer with a spiral dough hook, and have gradually been shortening mixing times when using medium to high-hydration doughs and autolyse steps. If I go longer than 90 seconds, the dough seems to get soupier rather than firmer. I'm assuming the gluten will break down if I go longer than this, but everyone online who writes about mixing bread mechanically mentions mixing times of several minutes. Should I ignore the apparent weakening of the dough and mix longer?

 

My dough ends up being extremely extensible, but almost entirely without elasticity. At hydration levels above 65% my boules get floppy and almost resemble focaccia. (using half KA AP flour, half KA bread). But it's delicious ... like the best tasting bread I've had. When I lower the hydration, I get beautiful, professional looking boules that just taste ok. 

 

Should I mix longer or change the dough development steps in any other way? Right now I'm making the recipe as written, with regard to autolyse, mixing, and stretch / fold schedule. I've increased the hydration to 70%, and am using a lower percentage of starter, to facilitate a longer warm ferment. My starter gives the flavors I like if it gets a few hours in the 90°F range.

 

For one trial I tried adding a couple of extra stretch / fold steps. This made a stronger dough, but gave a tightly organized crumb that was less chewy, and resembled commercial sandwich bread. Not awesome.

 

Any tips on how to get a stronger dough that will hold its shape, without compromising flavor, will make me oh so happy.

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I bake a couple loves of French lean bread once a week.  Tonight's baguette was particularly lovely.  I have a KitchenAid and rather than finishing on speed two I've been finishing my dough on speed four or higher for a shorter time.  Not recommended of course.  Don't tell on me.  But why pay for a commercial mixer if you can't beat the hell out of it?

 

It sure was good.

 

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I have a KitchenAid and rather than finishing on speed two I've been finishing my dough on speed four or higher for a shorter time. 

 

I thought most of the recipes say to finish mixing on medium speed which I've been using between 4 and 6 on my kitchenaid?

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22 minutes ago, rob1234 said:

 

I thought most of the recipes say to finish mixing on medium speed which I've been using between 4 and 6 on my kitchenaid?

 

Interesting!  I'd love to know what the MB folks call "medium".  I had originally been using 1 for low and 2 for medium.

 

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4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Interesting!  I'd love to know what the MB folks call "medium".  I had originally been using 1 for low and 2 for medium.

 

Having said that, I sometimes have to hold the mixer in place so it doesn't fly off the counter when mixing at that speed so maybe it should be slower.

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