Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Raamo

Baking with Myhrvold's "Modernist Bread: The Art and Science"

Recommended Posts

IMG_8277.thumb.JPG.22092d4c50c6de2c067dbe6e2fe7864a.JPG

 

IMG_8278.thumb.JPG.7ee5a25e9ac5a63f1e78ef7ff3355a87.JPG

 

compleat wheat version of sandwich loaf -  baked in CSO

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

received_10155352303054150.thumb.jpeg.c64d0b57b31123f6876a48fb54ebbb55.jpegreceived_10155352275614150.thumb.jpeg.c77c2b782a9dbe2b0228dda329ea128e.jpeg

 

Modernist Challah.  I know I did multiple things wrong, one of them being not using osmotolerant yeast as I didn't realize the typo / oversight of not listing it in the recipe.  I think it was underproofed as a result?  I aired on the side of caution as the room it was proofing in was a bit hotter than 70f.  It was very dense and very much on the dry side.  Its also very much a possibility I have never had real challah, however.

 

Did a 5 strand braid which seemed fairly simple and I got progressively better.  The full 2kg recipe was nice for learning how to braid and roll the strands... but I think I'll be halfing it if possible next time.  4 loafs is a lot of challah, but my friends appreciated the free bread.  Baked in my brand new cadco xaft115.

 

I have Sourdough Starter Attempt #3 going.  I've moved to a glass jar to see if my container was the reason it was not behaving correctly.  I need to find a source for rye flour locally too as I really want to try the 100% rye.  I've only found the Bob's Red Mill Dark Rye so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, repiv said:

received_10155352303054150.thumb.jpeg.c64d0b57b31123f6876a48fb54ebbb55.jpegreceived_10155352275614150.thumb.jpeg.c77c2b782a9dbe2b0228dda329ea128e.jpeg

 

Modernist Challah.  I know I did multiple things wrong, one of them being not using osmotolerant yeast as I didn't realize the typo / oversight of not listing it in the recipe.  I think it was underproofed as a result?  I aired on the side of caution as the room it was proofing in was a bit hotter than 70f.  It was very dense and very much on the dry side.  Its also very much a possibility I have never had real challah, however.

 

Did a 5 strand braid which seemed fairly simple and I got progressively better.  The full 2kg recipe was nice for learning how to braid and roll the strands... but I think I'll be halfing it if possible next time.  4 loafs is a lot of challah, but my friends appreciated the free bread.  Baked in my brand new cadco xaft115.

 

I have Sourdough Starter Attempt #3 going.  I've moved to a glass jar to see if my container was the reason it was not behaving correctly.  I need to find a source for rye flour locally too as I really want to try the 100% rye.  I've only found the Bob's Red Mill Dark Rye so far.

If it's too dry to eat - slice, dry well in oven and use for a nice lemon bread pudding - alternate bread, globs of lemon curd and custard. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Gateau battu 

That looks really dark on top -- is it really that dark in person?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

That looks really dark on top -- is it really that dark in person?

It's pretty dark with the egg wash - but doesn't taste burned at all. The pics in the book and online show it pretty dark as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Makes fabulous french toast - sucks up eggs like a sponge.

 

IMG_8287.thumb.JPG.61616c56cac7e11f2dfe36aff63e9123.JPG

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday got around to trying the direct ciabatta recipe (using my new Ankarsrum mixer). The fermentation moved pretty fast, but fortunately I was around to manage it, and I'm pretty happy with the result. It was a really slack dough at 88% hydration (here in Italy the standard ciabatta uses only 80% hydration - my guess is that it's due to the differences in flours...next time I'll probably stay closer to that level) but handled well enough with a generous dusting of semola rimacinata. Final proof on a couche and baked uncovered on the back of a baking sheet with a tray of boiling water on the floor of the oven for the first 20 minutes of so. The crumb was quite open, creamy and translucent and very tender. 

IMG_1517.jpg

IMG_1519.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In line with @Kerry Beal's French Toast above, this morning I had some leftover mature levain (I always make a bit extra, and I had a change of heart about which breads to make today so had even more than usual). I combined it with salt, sugar, baking soda, an egg, and enough milk to get the consistency I needed and made "sourdough" pancakes. Of course these aren't really leavened much by the levain, that's what the baking soda was for, but they turned out pretty well. I think using baking soda instead of baking powder was a tactical error on my part, it neutralized too much of the acidity from the starter. Next time I'd use baking powder, I think.

Pancakes.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used the modernist brioche recipe for praline and raisin buns

 

IMG_8319.thumb.JPG.070f0b679dff31ca21effdddb0bf79fa.JPG

IMG_8320.thumb.JPG.54c8553ddf99418095c89d57feee6cb8.JPG

 

IMG_8322.thumb.JPG.2b6a833d40df77ce23662ecf17b2f18e.JPG

 

 

  • Like 5
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inspired from last weekends Babka, I've made a cinnamon filling and going to make something akin to cinnamon rolls.

IMG_20180204_164052.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

San Francisco Sourdough

 

A deliberately sour sourdough, via the inclusion of a bit of rye flour in the final stiff levain. I made mine with a 24-hour final proof in the refrigerator -- done for timing reasons, but it resulted in a very nicely flavored loaf.

 

DSC_7269.jpg

 

DSC_7278.jpg

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surfer Sourdough

 

A high-hydration sourdough. Nice flavor, but the texture and aesthetics leave something to be desired.

 

DSC_7271.jpg

 

DSC_7280.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sourdough with Porridge

 

I made this one with a cornmeal porridge made from a fresh Oklahoma cornmeal courtesy of @Tri2Cook. The addition of a porridge makes for a pretty slack dough, I think it would have been a better-looking loaf if it were made a bit lower hydration. The flavor is excellent, of course.

 

DSC_7275.jpg

 

DSC_7283.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chocolate Cherry Sourdough

 

As if I could make it through a weekend of baking without making this one! By popular demand, this time with a mix of bing and tart cherries, dehydrated overnight (which was not long enough to reproduce the dryness of commercial dehydrated cherries, so they have a different texture this time around). I also made the dough a bit lower hydration so it was easier to work with. I don't think the texture suffered for it.

 

DSC_7274.jpg

 

DSC_7286.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

San Francisco Sourdough

 

A deliberately sour sourdough, via the inclusion of a bit of rye flour in the final stiff levain. I made mine with a 24-hour final proof in the refrigerator -- done for timing reasons, but it resulted in a very nicely flavored loaf.

 

Chris, can you comment on how this sourdough compares with true (that is, made in that area) San Francisco sourdough?  Every time I think I have it right, I get a chance to taste the local stuff and realize how far off I am. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Chris, can you comment on how this sourdough compares with true (that is, made in that area) San Francisco sourdough?  Every time I think I have it right, I get a chance to taste the local stuff and realize how far off I am. 

 

With the caveat that although I’ve been to San Francisco several times, I’ve never lived there, so I’m not an expert on the nuances, I think this bread is closer to a San Francisco style than their baseline recipe. The sourdough I’ve had in SFO was even more sour than this one, however, so I think some experimentation with levain maturity is in order.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any mention in Modernist Bread of Georgian cheese breads, khachapuri?  Or other Georgian breads?  The index is no help, and I confess I have not finished reading MB cover to cover.*

 

 

*or more properly, covers to covers.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started working on the SF Sourdough this am (stiff levain now in fridge until morning) - but realized I needed something to hold the family over so did the Pain Rustique with an extra 40 grams of light rye. Forgot to save some of the dough for my next pate fermente.

 

IMG_8361.thumb.JPG.b74401c74b13805bdfb1e01771d87292.JPG

 

It made two loaves - but one is pretty much eaten.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_8372.thumb.JPG.49f242309cda38121ed7e0135f62d706.JPG

 

SF Sourdough - sent a loaf to school with the child - when we went to pick her up one of the Educational Assistants commented how it tasted just like the bread she'd had down at Fisherman's Wharf


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

American pumpernickel - onions added after first turn as I failed to read recipe through before starting.

 

IMG_8442.thumb.JPG.ba043909d6b6bb879abe49fbce260512.JPG

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

German Sunflower Seed Rye Bread (p. 4•402)

 

This is a quite compact loaf, but not as dense as I expected based on the writeup. It's made with a very high percentage of rye levain, plus some rye flour and a small amount of wheat flour. The sunflower seeds are toasted and soaked before including, plus some extra sprinkled on top. A starch slurry would have helped a lot there, the seeds didn't want to stick to the top, they come off too easily. The taste and texture are quite good, though it's a bit of an odd-shaped loaf because it's so short.

 

DSC_7870.jpg

 

DSC_7874.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      I have Volumes 1 ,2 and 4 of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's Great Chocolate books are for sale.
       
      The books are in great shape!  There is some tape on the corner of the front of volume 1 that I used to keep it together after a drop.  Volume 1 is also autographed by the author (See pics below).
       
      I'm asking $150 for the lot OBO.
       
      Let me know if interested or if you have questions
       
       
       



    • By K8CanCook
      Good day eG peoples!
       
      I am going to purchase a copy of Larousse Gastronomique (English, because I cannot speak French as well as most French toddlers), and I am wondering which version you think is better and why? Let your opinions fly freely...hold nothing back!
    • By Hideo Sakai
      Any idea what is the best book for me? I am starting to love cooking, I just got great recipe of sauces from this book "Restaurant Style Barbecue Sauce Recipes" all I need is the proper technique for grilling. Thanks
    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By gibbs
      With Modernist Cuisine I waited a couple of years and ended up with a copy from the 6th printing run the advantage of this was that all errors picked up in the erratta had been corrected in the print copy.  I am looking to get modernist bread soon and wondered if someone had purchased it recently to check or if someone knew of hand if they have printed any additional corrected runs 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×