Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Raamo

Baking with Myhrvold's "Modernist Bread: The Art and Science"

Recommended Posts

I got snowed in today and made the lavish bread on a whim.  I'm unsure if I did it right.  It puffed up and would fool most people into thinking it was pita bread.  Google results for lavish bread yields many different result and styles.

 

Will post pictures tomorrow.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

B826C4BE-9CF5-49C3-971D-6A06AAD23680.thumb.jpeg.dd7b81ccbe7f2dc93c9f35cbca2bbfa6.jpeg

 

Sourdough bâtard. Mixed up yesterday and cold proofed in the refrigerator overnight.  Baked in the CSO ( Cuisinart steam oven). Oven was preheated for 30 minutes on convection  450°F and then baked on the steam function at 450°F until done. 

 Because I had had a couple of days of total failures of my breads I decided to cheat just a little and used 1/8 of a teaspoon of instant yeast. Consider it a pre-mental break down prophylactic. xD

  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

0C64961D-819F-466A-8B35-5A4A5DFE4FBC.thumb.jpeg.0f8437af73212a59ee8ed18067e69604.jpeg

 

 This is the sourdough crumb.  I’m just not sure how much I like this bread.  The trouble with being dependent on commercial sourdough is that you develop a taste for it and even if you get something better it’s just not the same. It’s a bit like the kids preferring the blue box (Kraft Dinner) over homemade macaroni and cheese.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Anna N said:

I’m just not sure how much I like this bread.

Are you looking for more sourness, or just something different?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

Are you looking for more sourness, or just something different?

Perhaps just a different name. I guess the point I’m trying to make is that it is not the sourdough that I am accustomed to. And I will give you that the sourdough I am accustomed to would not meet too many other people’s idea of sourdough. I suspect what I was eating would more properly be called a country-style bread with a sturdy texture and a soft crust. I need to stop comparing apples and oranges I guess. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Perhaps just a different name. I guess the point I’m trying to make is that it is not the sourdough that I am accustomed to. And I will give you that the sourdough I am accustomed to would not meet too many other people’s idea of sourdough. I suspect what I was eating would more properly be called a country-style bread with a sturdy texture and a soft crust. I need to stop comparing apples and oranges I guess. 

 

Anna I am confused what you mean.  Are you saying the sourdough loaf you just made was "country-style bread with a sturdy texture" or were you saying the sourdough you were accustomed to was "country-style bread with a sturdy texture"?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cinnamon raisin bread 

 

IMG_7967.thumb.JPG.2279b70eae481cc4fd4121c0e657af52.JPG

 

Docked to see if it would prevent delamination IMG_7969.thumb.JPG.ad6439964ad4feb6d593d6ca722693a7.JPG

 

IMG_7970.thumb.JPG.634eb71c0ee5941c21ffb0137fa306fe.JPG

 

IMG_7972.thumb.JPG.6ae6356f51cfb823420fd560cd92028b.JPG

 

second loaf - tin foil tent stuck to the crust

 

IMG_7975.thumb.JPG.d3eb09dbd13efbf686f239950b1e10e1.JPGp

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got something like five different breads in progress right now. The first one that was ready is...

 

American Pumpernickel (p. 4•308)

 

Lots going on here. First, this bread includes both levain and osmotolerant yeast (which I finally have and didn't have to substitute). It also calls for caramel color, which I don't have and didn't feel like making. So I used coffee instead. It also has a lot of cocoa powder in it, and a hefty dose of molasses. The upshot is that basically none of the color is "real" here, as is typical for this style of rye. Despite the inclusion of the levain, it's got enough commercial yeast in it that it gets created like a direct dough. It rises very quickly, and only needed to proof for an hour or so. 

 

The recipe calls for baking it in a loaf pan, but I was feeling retro tonight...

DSC_6819.jpg

 

You can probably guess where this is going...

DSC_6821.jpg

 

No, there is no soup mix involved in that spinach dip. It's a recipe from a 2002 issue of Cook's Illustrated:

DSC_6822.jpg

 

DSC_6826.jpg

 

This is a delicious rye bread, with lots of flavor from the onions and caraway. It's got a nice, soft texture, but we ate it fresh enough that the crust was still crispy. Worlds better than the supermarket equivalent.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Anna I am confused what you mean.  Are you saying the sourdough loaf you just made was "country-style bread with a sturdy texture" or were you saying the sourdough you were accustomed to was "country-style bread with a sturdy texture"?

 

The latter. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Chris Hennes

 

a 2002 issue of Cook's Illustrated

 

 can you be more specific on the issue ?

 

Id like to look that Rx up.

 

thanks

 

P.S.:  May/June pp  15

 

knew there was a reason I saved so many old CI's

 

back then there was a lot less churn  

 

and some decent stuff.


Edited by rotuts (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the lavish bread.  Still unsure if I screwed something up along the way.  On a scale of 1-10 I'd give it a 5.  It wasn't bad, but it was just worse pita with a lack of depth of flavor.  The only thing that would push me to make this again is how dead nuts easy it was start to finish.  I haven't tried any of the dough relaxer techniques mentioned in the book, but I feel like this would benefit from it if I tried it again.

 

5a5d80686456c_chrisc83.jpg.485e19992b23dc7b80368a2fd0b88de9.jpg5a5d806a62f7b_chrisc84.jpg.89b87b138c73dd3c51b8348f0c2ab7e9.jpg

 

Second thing I made this weekend was the second chance sourdough.  Not out of choice, but because I can't get a levain going or to stay going.  Everything starts fine.  Looks good and healthy after the first 48h and first feeding.  Second feeding it looked alright, but I didn't look at it during full maturity.  Third feeding it was a bit sad looking.  Fourth looked alright, passed the float test and I managed to make a loaf of bread with it but didn't see much rise in the dough while proofing, but seemed to pass the finger test.  Went ahead and baked it... well, lets just say I've learned I need to either check the load in time or run a second timer.  My phone crashed with the timer and I had to 'guess' when it was done.  Turns out I guessed wrong, so I was left with an undercooked loaf that I couldn't really tell would've resulted in success or not.  Large empty cavity, but what was cooked looked good.

 

But on to the second chance sourdough.  Very much enjoyed this bread.   Made my 1kg loaf a bit too big for my cast iron cooker but I don't think it hurt it too much.  Made a couple not pictured baguettes too (still working on my baguette shaping...)

 

5a5d805f902fe_chrisc81.jpg.0649b414cd886283d805a52b7a597d54.jpg5a5d806c710d3_chrisc85.jpg.0db13491d734f066bf5353cee41c1f84.jpg

 

Third baking project was the reason I bought this book.  I didn't want recipes that told me exactly how to make good bread.  I wanted to know WHAT made bread and how to make bread however I want.  I live in Memphis, TN and my family is from Louisiana so I take poboys pretty seriously.  I wanted to make a poboy french bread loaf like no other.  I based my recipe loosely around the bahn mi and A+ baguette.  Added 30g corn meal, half of it being toasted.  20g sugar, 20g olive oil.  Then the fun part... I wanted to try the gelatin high hydration method. 

This was about 85% hydration, but some was lost due to a poor method of going from the container I heated and cooled the gelatin in to the mixing bowl so maybe a bit less.  Super easy to handle the dough and maybe too easy as it was very stiff and I had to leave it out after the final fold.  Ended up baking it at 375 for 30 minutes.   Ended up better than I ever expected.  I'm not 100% sure what the gelatin / water effect had, but the crumb ended up super soft but not very open at all.  For a first shot as a last minute 'I'm bored and want a poboy' project it was a huge success.  What wasn't a success was actually taking pictures... but I do have this picture of the final poboy.  I froze the other 3 and a half loafs so maybe I can get a shot later if people are interested.

 

5a5d8062d3763_chrisc82.jpg.810ca9e61eb278e9a568dc86f5088514.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Delicious 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Modernist Ciabatta (p. 4•160)

 

I didn't get as much rise out of mine as their image shows: I suspect I called proof early on this one (it's hard to read because it's so slack). Honestly, I've gotten a bit spoiled by the very long fermentation times of the other loaves I've been working on recently, this one was sort of bland in comparison. I know that's the nature of the beast, but I definitely prefer the longer fermentation times of the French lean bread and the sourdoughs.

 

DSC_6832.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Compleat Wheat (p. 4•137)

 

This is a "whole wheat" bread in that it's got white flour, bran, and germ all added in the appropriate proportions. You toast and soak the bran and germ separate from the endosperm, which lets you get a much lighter loaf than is typical of whole wheat flour, particularly naturally leavened. This recipe works very well and gives a terrific flavor and texture. The loaves are also beautiful, which is always nice.

 

DSC_6836.jpg

 

DSC_6840.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chocolate and Cranberry Sourdough (p. 4•80)

 

Of course, any time I'm making a bunch of sourdoughs this one gets requested. I subbed in cranberries for the cherries this time: it's still delicious. My starter is also much more robust than last time around, so the flavor and texture are both better as well.

 

DSC_6838.jpg

 

DSC_6842.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nutella Babka (p. 4•225)

 

I had an unopened jar of Nutella in my cupboard that expired something like two years ago (I don't exactly eat a lot of Nutella). Of course, expiration dates for such things are a bit sketchy, and it still tastes and smells fresh, so away we go using the thing up. I used basically the whole thing for this loaf, which is a 25% butter brioche with Nutella swirls (they also have a more homemade filling, but librarians will eat anything so I'm bringing the Nutella into work tomorrow!). The baking time was a bit suspect, but I just kept a careful eye on it and pulled it when I couldn't imagine wanting the crust any darker.

 

DSC_6843.jpg

 

DSC_6845.jpg

 

DSC_6846.jpg

 

DSC_6851.jpg

 

DSC_6854.jpg

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Chris Hennes

 

that Babka is impressive !

 

finest one Ive ever seen.

 

congratulations !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided I wanted to make Ciabatta, and I was impatient so I made the direct ciabatta.... and then I said sure lets make the full 1kg at a time...

 

Proofing took forever, and it overflowed my container - making quite the mess.

Anyway it worked and it's tasty, but it made me swore never again to make 1kg "loaf" of ciabatta at once again.

 

20180114_165425.thumb.jpg.e715bf07e6998ce50236fdef1a152271.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 American Pumpernickel was on my radar but when @Chris Hennes tackled it I moved it up on my list. 

 

 Like Chris I was missing caramel colouring so I subbed a tablespoon of espresso powder dissolved in 30 g of water. I was also missing non-dutched cocoa powder so I subbed in black cocoa powder.  That certainly made for a dramatic looking loaf.

 

The recipe calls for 75 g of caramelized onions and I tried to do the math to reduce  thr given recipe to give me a little over 75 g. Apparently my math failed me again or maybe my caramelizing ability but I definitely ended up with far more onions than I needed. But in which universe are extra caramelized onions a bad thing?

 

I do think the amount of yeast called for is a bit over-the-top and would consider reducing it the next time. This dough ferments at an alarming rate. 

 

I love the taste and it reminds me of a Dempster’s bread (Pumpernickel rye) that I enjoy. 

 

 One nitpick. I found the crust not to my liking. I would’ve preferred it to be very similar to the texture of the crumb.  It’s a bit crispy which I don’t find quite right with this bread. 

 

271B3F58-C24C-49DF-A283-3D32DD581B5A.thumb.jpeg.b4840a8a90c08fd6716b1f4a75d2da43.jpeg

 

A1C1F067-05A9-46C2-830E-5CCAF1333242.thumb.jpeg.beb9ebfa0e41c80158ca2beffd02d0d4.jpeg

 

 Not sure why it looks wet but it is not. 

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Anna N Wow, that color is dramatic. I’m not familiar with “black cocoa powder” — do you have a link handy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if that was a mistake or not, but I love the look of that bread. It's almost Gothic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So today I decided to try the second chance sourdough since my starter proved to have little lifting power (I feed once a week in the fridge... after a month of daily feeding)

 

Anyway it's yummy, though not as sourdoughy as the sourdough I made earlier with the same starter.

 

20180116_170802.thumb.jpg.a82b0a7001a3f200e8adfd6daa34f9ce.jpg

 

20180116_170944.thumb.jpg.44a1b88832b63cc5485fd84cd99be2fb.jpg

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

@Anna N Wow, that color is dramatic. I’m not familiar with “black cocoa powder” — do you have a link handy?

 

Interesting, never heard of it before myself, from google:

 

Black cocoa is cocoa powder that has been heavily Dutched. If you've ever had an Oreo cookie, the outer cookies are a good example of black cocoa. Because it has a strong, very brusque flavor, it's best used in conjunction with another cocoa powder and is mostly used to boost color.

 

Seems king author sells it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By CCB
      I used my homemade toffee in a cookie recipe hoping that the toffee will add a crunch to the cookie... it didn't turn out well as the toffee melted and didn't keep its hardened crunch form. How can I prevent my toffee from melting in my cookie recipe?
    • By Rho
       
      The space race trickled into kitchens in the 60s and 70s, including one curious tool that's faded away in the years since: the thermal pin, a heat pipe skewer that can halve cooking times for roasts:

       
      Heat pipes are thermal superconductors, transferring heat 500-1000 times more effectively than solid copper (some people in the sous vide thread have discussed copper pins). They're hollow tubes with the air evacuated and a small amount of working fluid, often water. The usable temperature range is limited by the triple point and the critical point, with additional constraints near the edges. Water is effective from 20C-280C /70F-530F, which comfortably spans most cooking temperatures.
       
      Modernist Bread has an excellent section on how bread bakes, including a diagram of the internal heat pipes that develop, summarized here. (click for a good photo!)
       
      Sous-vide solves the overcooking side of the gradient problem, but it's still limited by total heat diffusion time-- doubling the size of a cut quadruples the time needed for the center to reach temperature. Heat pipe pins should make larger cuts practical, or normal cuts cook faster. Here's a graph from "The heat pipe and its potential for enhancing the cooking and cooling of meat joints", showing average temperatures over time for 1kg joints of meat convection baked at 190C/375F for 110 minutes (foil removed for the last 30 minutes):

       
      Thermal pins were sold commercially from 1956 to about 1990. They're listed occasionally for about $20 on ebay. They even made potato baking racks with heat pipes-- though now you can easily par-cook a potato in the microwave and finish it in the oven.
       
      I don't know why production of thermal pins stopped, or what fundamental problems limited their usage. It seems like pans and commercial griddles would be improved by adding heat pipes to spread heat throughout and avoid hot or cold spots. Perhaps roasts fell out of favor as the culture of entertaining shifted away from monolithic centerpieces to smaller, more precisely cooked portions.
    • By philie
      Hey there, i hope to find some help in the wise hands of yours. after some research i am still having some problems concerning glazing:
       
      For a party i would like to make some cubes and rounded savoury cakes and foams out of silicone forms that have a ready bottom and a colour glazing. 
      Somehow i just do not manage to find a steady glazing ( one that does not run ) and is for texture reasons preferably hard or crisp that does not include sugar or syrup.
       
      can you help me or lead my way in a certain direction?
       
      thanks very much!
    • By trfl
      Dear fellow bakers,
      We have been baking no-knead bread at home for several years and as a family of scientists and engineers, we consistently tried to make it even more easier and convenient. 
      We liked what we ended up with so much that, I decided to start a small company (based in Eindhoven, Netherlands) to make a new bread kit product out of it.
       
      I am seeking your help to know your opinion of the product and how the story is told.
       
      LoafNest is an improvement on no-knead Dutch oven bread making. We took perforated silicone liner designed for professional bread baking and put it into a uniquely designed cast iron casserole. With this improvement, there is no need for shaping or second raising of the bread. You just mix, let the dough raise, pre-heat, pour the dough, bake and done!
       
      So, LoafNest is a no-knead, no-mess, no-cleanup solution for convenient and practical bread making.
       
      The perforated silicone liner is from the same company that makes Silpat mats. Our liner is a more advanced version with perforations that allow radiative, conductive and convective heat to all sides of the bread. It is also rated to a higher temperature (260C/500F)
       
      With less than 5 minutes of active work that can fit into a busy schedule, we hope to reduce the entry barrier for people who are willing to make bread. Our primary targets are people who buy expensive premium bread but want to make their own premium bread at home or people who use bread machines and want to eat better bread.
       
      While it is not a primary target, we also believe this is a nice solution for experienced bakers who want to use a high-humidity, high thermal mass baking environment.
       
      You can find the details and more images on http://trfl.nl/LoafNest  [still a little bit work in progress] and http://trfl.nl/loafnest-gallery 
      What are your impressions of the product? Visually and functionally? What are your thoughts on how the story is told? Any improvement to resonate better with people who are thinking of starting to bake their own bread? Any thoughts on pricing? I would be grateful to your feedback and suggestions.
       
      I am sure, in the end, we all want more people to eat better and healthier bread. So please support me in this endeavor. 
       


    • By Chris Hennes
      Of the many zillions of inclusions they discuss in Modernist Bread, one that I'd honestly never considered was sprouted grains. Apparently I'm out of touch with the "health food" movement! Have any of you made bread with sprouted grains? Can you describe the flavor difference between sprouted versus just soaked? Right now I'm sprouting some rye, but I'm curious about what to expect from the finished product.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×