Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Edit History

Anna N

Anna N

59 minutes ago, Raamo said:

 

Grr why don't I have my books yet.  It's well below 0C here as well - but we keep the house humidified.  We are used to very wet dough since that's one of the keys behind AB in 5 mins a day.  Anyway back to the topic - we've found with other high end cookbooks that they sometimes require some adjustment - I was hoping MB would be more precise.  But there will be a Corrections and Clarifications page - alas it doesn't seem to be up yet...  

 

Are we talking about off by a cup or more  - or is this enough to be a factor of flour conditions?  I've made plenty of bread in the past where I had to add more flour then it called for.    What are the recipes pain de mie and _________?

 More than half a cup. And I’m not for a minute suggesting that the recipes are at fault. They’re using a very different flour  and probably a very different atmosphere.

 

Don’t think it would be too wise to post recipes. And while I know that ingredient lists cannot usually be copyrighted,  I am loath to risk any infringements. 

Anna N

Anna N

55 minutes ago, Raamo said:

 

Grr why don't I have my books yet.  It's well below 0C here as well - but we keep the house humidified.  We are used to very wet dough since that's one of the keys behind AB in 5 mins a day.  Anyway back to the topic - we've found with other high end cookbooks that they sometimes require some adjustment - I was hoping MB would be more precise.  But there will be a Corrections and Clarifications page - alas it doesn't seem to be up yet...  

 

Are we talking about off by a cup or more  - or is this enough to be a factor of flour conditions?  I've made plenty of bread in the past where I had to add more flour then it called for.    What are the recipes pain de mie and _________?

 More than half a cup. And I’m not for minute suggesting that the recipes are at fault. They’re using a very different flour  and probably a very different atmosphere. Don’t think it would be too wise to post recipes. And while I know that ingredient lists cannot usually be copyrighted,  I am loath to risk any infringements. 

  • Similar Content

    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Ankarsrum, the Swedish mixer of many names: Electrolux Assistent, DLX, Verona, Magic Mill...
       

       
       
      I understand a few eGullet folks have these, or have had.  Mine came this afternoon.  From what I've read, mixing procedure with the Ankarsrum is different from mixing with planetary stand mixers.  At the moment I need advice specifically with whether I should use the dough hook (with or without the scraper arm) or the roller attachment for my bread.
       
      The Ankarsrum manual says to use the dough hook for dough with between 1 and 1.5 liters of liquid ingredients.  OK.  My usual dough recipe uses 410 g of water.  Rose Levy Beranbaum in The Bread Bible says to use the dough hook when mixing less than 4 pounds of dough.  Which if my math is correct is about 750 g of water (math is not my thing).  Beranbaum adds "For larger amounts, use the roller and scraper."
       
      Yet most bread recipes in the Ankarsrum recipe booklet that call for the dough hook use about a liter of liquid.  The recipes that call for the roller use less liquid, 400-600 ml.  Beranbaum is usually right but I'm wondering if she's wrong?
       
      Thoughts or suggestions?
       
       
      P.S.  Sparkling Gold was not my first color choice.  Sparkling Gold was perhaps not my thirteenth color choice.  But Sparkling Gold was 10 percent off.  Besides, the gold color matches the gold lettering on the bowl and dials.  Now I feel better.
       
       
    • By jedovaty
      (Note: This topic was split from the Monkey Bread topic, to keep both discussions focused and relevant to the question at hand.)
      I made inverse puff pastry last week for "chasson aux pommes" (apple turnovers).  Never made puff pastry before.  Beginner's luck, turned out beyond expectations, super layers, butter, crisp exterior, tender honeycomb inerior (even without yeast!!), lightly sweet, slightly tart, it took every bit of will power not to eat them before taking them to work. 
      Based on all the suggestions, I saved the scraps, and additionally separated them by size and shape.  Seems like I can make something called "monkey bread", but I have no clue what that actually is.  I've researched it, and it seems I should just bunch it up with sugar and bake... but these aren't yeasted, sooooo wouldn't bunching these up screw up the layers and make more of a pie dough squishy thing?
      Reading the forums, with puff pastry I can make little cookies or crackers or other things.  But I'm not quite sure how to do this?  They are kind of small to twist into sticks or roll into arlettes?  Help please and thank you??? 🤝
      For now, I've put scraps in the freezer.

    • By Okanagancook
      I was reminded the other day of the egg-in-plastic-wrap-poach method.
       
    • By MSRadell
      GE is entering the SV field in an innovative way. They are doing a crowdfunding approach through one of their Innovation technology centers. The device itself is also innovative in that it uses a Inductive cooktop for the heating element with a wireless temperature sensor. It's also unique in that it does not include any type of water circulation.
       
      Here's a link to the crowdfunding site: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/paragon-induction-cooktop/
       
      What does everybody think about this entry into the field? If nothing else it certainly shows that SV has gotten the attention of major appliance makers. A few weeks ago GE also announced that one of their new lines of stoves will have the same type of temperature control as this device uses so you can do SV on your stovetop.
       
    • By Luke
      I made the Creme Anglaise recipe from Myhrvold Modernist Cuisine - it did look curdled and lumpy coming out of the zip lock bag as described in the recipe.
       
      I used my stick blender to smooth it out as instructed, but I think I blended it for too long, and it went from lumpy to smooth to watery. Did I make a fatal mistake of over blending the custard?
       
      The recipe does not say how to blend or when to stop.
       
      Hoping one of the gurus can give me guidance before I try this again.
       
      Many Thanks
      Luke
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...