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Trick-or-treat instructions. Really?


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Hello all.

i just got home and found a note in my letter box:

 

"Dear Neighbour,

our family is excited to be participating in this year's Halloween festivities, and our lovely children are very much looking forward to charming you on their trick-or-treat adventures.

we would like for you to know that our children have allergies to nuts and gluten, so could you please ensure you are able to provide any food products that omit these items?

 Thanks"

 

i dont even even know who this family might be, and I'm guessing that with Halloween costumes, I won't be able to tell who are the sickly, pale  kids anyway.  Since when did it become my issue to monitor someone else's dietary restrictions when dropping treats into a bag?

seriously!

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You’ll recognize them, they’re those same darn kids you keep yelling at to get off your lawn. 

 

And I guess you won’t be painting your pumpkin teal? https://www.foodallergy.org/education-awareness/teal-pumpkin-project

 

The note does seem presumptuous and entitled and parents can certainly read the ingredients (and teach the kids to do so). But they probably figure it doesn’t hurt to ask. How much of a drag would it be as a child to not get to eat half your Halloween candy?

 

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It seems rude to ask - maybe if they'd offered to drop off something if your treats weren't suitable?

 

We do the teal pumpkin thing but it's voluntary and honestly some kids just seem to prefer non-toys. I guess more variety than a whole bag of candy? Previous years we made up little baggies but this year we just bought one of the pre-packaged party assortments of smallish toys and will let kids pick from that instead of the candy bowl. It wasn't much and I expect it will last a couple of years easy. (We live right near an elementary school so we get a lot of traffic since poeple tend to know the area and feel comfortable having their kids walking around.)

 

We also usually have full size candy bars which is always popular. (My mom lives with us ATM and she stalks the sales relentlessly until she finds the assortment packs on super sale, so it costs less than you'd think, and the kids love it.)

 

We don't have any relevant allergies in the house, but my mom's lactose intolerant and just watching her deal with that all my life, I feel bad for kids who have to be crazy careful all the time and can't even really trick or treat normally.

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"You’ll recognize them, they’re those same darn kids you keep yelling at to get off your lawn."

That's pretty gratuitous.

 

Parents with children who have a food intolerance can also be more proactive. When faced with such issues, I always purchased the necessary substitutes in advance and, after culling the offending items, stealthily replaced them with the safe items. A responsible parent would be foolish to place such a burden on total strangers.

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I get it, and I would hate to be the parent who has to rifle through the goody bag weeding out what is acceptable and what is not.

i also think it's somehow thoughtful for the parent to go around the neighbourhood and drop flyers in our boxes.

for background- Halloween is a relatively new festival observed in Australia, only perhaps the last decade or so have we been more and more interested in it as a celebration.

in fact, I've never ever had a trick-or-treater until two years ago.

we bought some of those little chocolate bars for the last years offering, but I have made some very nice fudge and some cookies for this year.  I got cellophane and ribbons and made little packages for any Rugrats that dare knock on our door.

unfortunately, these "treats" aren't gluten or nut free so I could just turn a blind eye and then they become "tricks" right? (Kidding)

Edited by Cronker (log)
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Actually, are little toys a thing? Never heard of that as a Halloween treat, but makes sense.

as I mentioned, Halloween is a relatively new thing here in Australia.

had I known about toys being an option, I could have bought a whole heap from my volunteer op-shop!

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6 hours ago, Cronker said:

I get it, and I would hate to be the parent who has to rifle through the goody bag weeding out what is acceptable and what is not.

i also think it's somehow thoughtful for the parent to go around the neighbourhood and drop flyers in our boxes.

 


I don't get it at all. It's basically saying "please restrict every kid out trick-or-treating that night to items that meet the dietary needs of my children". Because, unless mom has a "we're the allergy kids" sign attached to the kid's costumes, how would anybody know which kids the letter referred to? Weeding through what the kids can and can't eat is part of the parent's responsibility as the parents of children with allergies. 

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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its the parents job , period.

 

if the risks are too high for their children doing     .........................

 

then they kindly and politely restrict their children's activities  not the whole neighborhoods nor the entire public school district's

 

this is an outstanding example of the times :   selfish self centerdness.

 

that being said , it is unfortunate that the children have nut allergies.

 

I wouldn't wish this on anyone.

 

but its extraordinarily selfish to project the problem on the neighborhood 

 

perhaps an illuminated sign at the top of your driveway might read :

 

" We Eat Nuts "

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Agreed with rotuts -

 

I have friends who have anaphylactic allergies as well as kids with allergies.

 

The onus is on the parent to ensure their kids are not eating harmful foods - just as the onus is on parents to ensure kids dont eat opened candies, etc.

 

That note however is a joke and if those parents are relying on others to screen the candies for whomever their kids are, they are clueless.

 

On a side note - if you are above 12 years old and are coming to trick'o'treat at my house tonight - I hope you bring a change of underwear!  :)

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8 hours ago, Cronker said:

in fact, I've never ever had a trick-or-treater until two years ago.

we bought some of those little chocolate bars for the last years offering, but I have made some very nice fudge and some cookies for this year.  I got cellophane and ribbons and made little packages for any Rugrats that dare knock on our door.

 

That sounds lovely.  it's probably too late considering time zones, but for you or others giving out home-made treats, it would be thoughtful to at least include the major allergens on a sticker somewhere - i.e. 'contains milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, and (specify which) tree nuts' so people can avoid if needed.  Later, when sorting through the loot, they may not remember that you said 'walnut fudge', so best to put it in writing.

 

In the US, the FDA wants the top 8 allergens specified - milk, wheat, egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, and fish.  Except for the fish, sweets have a lot of those!  (A lot of chocolate contains soy lecithin, apparently tolerable for many who otherwise avoid soy, but I still have to label for it.  Earlier this year, I had to do an FDA recall because I hadn't declared milk or soy in some  chocolate bars so food allergies are on my mind.)  Labeling is an extra step, but worth it to know you're giving the consumer accurate information so they can make informed decisions. Otherwise, people may just throw your treats away if they don't know what's in them :(

 

 

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9 hours ago, Cronker said:

Hello all.

i just got home and found a note in my letter box:

 

"Dear Neighbour,

our family is excited to be participating in this year's Halloween festivities, and our lovely children are very much looking forward to charming you on their trick-or-treat adventures.

we would like for you to know that our children have allergies to nuts and gluten, so could you please ensure you are able to provide any food products that omit these items?

 Thanks"

 

i dont even even know who this family might be, and I'm guessing that with Halloween costumes, I won't be able to tell who are the sickly, pale  kids anyway.  Since when did it become my issue to monitor someone else's dietary restrictions when dropping treats into a bag?

seriously!

 

Seriously?  Maybe they could keep their 'lovely' (I'll just bet) kids at home and feed them something safe to  eat.  Or take them to the many, many neighborhood or church Halloween events.

Good grief, I can't believe the gall.

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out of curiosity I looked at the bags of candy I bought

 

I enjoy following the Markets.  a few years ago RiteAid had the cheapest ' better ' candy     $$/bag

 

but that was 2 weeks ++ before the Event in Question.   they prices steadily rose as H approached.

 

now Stop$Shop has made its move   ( or maybe Mars.Inc + S&S )   5 bags of Mars candy $ 10 USD.   only 2 weeks before the event

 

I looked at the bags :  the usual assortment.  4 clearly had nuts in their formulation :  Snickers , etc.

 

on the back there was a label new to me , but Ive never checked the back :  

 

"  partially processed w genetic engineering "

 

and 3 Muscketeers  has no nuts

 

but "   may contain peanuts "

 

maybe tha's modern speak for the older  " processed at a plant that may process nuts "

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Not to mention that they are telling you this the day before Halloween?  Most folks, I would assume, already have their candy purchased and ready to go.

 

I guess you could switch to those vile little boxes of raisins.........

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In Canada it's easy to get candy made in nut free facilities - knowing I have a couple of nut allergic kids down the street - that's what I buy. But refuse to go gluten free or I won't be able to dump the leftovers. But since I'm not home I'm sure the lights will be off at my house tonight!

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well

 

the 4 - 9 group

 

well  its worth it for them

 

esp the 4 + group

 

they can barely negotiate 3 stares

 

because their eyes are Sooooooo wide open w amazement !

 

after 9 ....................

 

its pretty much a Giggle Club of Friends

 

which is wonderful in itself.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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12 hours ago, Cronker said:

Actually, are little toys a thing? Never heard of that as a Halloween treat, but makes sense.

as I mentioned, Halloween is a relatively new thing here in Australia.

had I known about toys being an option, I could have bought a whole heap from my volunteer op-shop!

 

Toys aren't a super common thing and most kids do prefer candy and will be cranky if they just get toys. However it makes an alternative for the kids that prefer it or can't have candy.

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13 hours ago, Cronker said:

Hello all.

i just got home and found a note in my letter box:

 

"Dear Neighbour,

our family is excited to be participating in this year's Halloween festivities, and our lovely children are very much looking forward to charming you on their trick-or-treat adventures.

we would like for you to know that our children have allergies to nuts and gluten, so could you please ensure you are able to provide any food products that omit these items?

 Thanks"

 

i dont even even know who this family might be, and I'm guessing that with Halloween costumes, I won't be able to tell who are the sickly, pale  kids anyway.  Since when did it become my issue to monitor someone else's dietary restrictions when dropping treats into a bag?

seriously!

 

 

HAHAHA!

 

That note takes balls. No kid eats all that candy anyway.

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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