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Thanksgiving Side Dishes

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Looks like I'm cooking TG dinner for the first time in ages. There will be turkey (SV probably), jalapeno cornbread (son's non-negotiable demand) and the rest is open to suggestion.

 

Any great recipes out there?

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CI's green bean casserole.

Ina Garten's cranberry chutney.

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I'm hosting TG dinner for the first time ever. Never made a turkey before! This should be fun.

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Braised red cabbage

Cauliflower gratin

Creamed spinach

Glazed carrots

Roasted root vegetables

Corn pudding

 

I'm sure I'll think of more--but this will start the conversation.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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12 minutes ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

Braised red cabbage

 

I love red cabbage. How do you make yours? 

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This is some good stuff. The consomme itself is intense -- bright and clean and flavorful and a little sweet. Store-bought "cranberry juice" is a pale imitation. I find new uses for this each year. I think I'm going to do a gellan-based "cranberry sauce" this year. I might even set the gel in a can so I can unmold it and it'll look like a can of Ocean Spray. 

 

 

The yield sucks, and you're going to feel bad about all the softened cranberries you throw away. But that's life without a centerfuge for you. (I did make a cranberry "bbq sauce" once with some spent berries... it was alright.)  There's also no need to use a circulator... boil-in-a-bag works just fine (or better)/. Weigh your bags down. Cranberries be like: WE ALL FLOAT DOWN HERE!

 

Comic Sans makes everything scarier. Even cranberries.

 

Anyway, the obvious use is for cocktails and mocktails. This guy was 1.5oz cran, 2oz gin, a dash of simple, fill with seltzer. (You can see the National Dog Show in the background, so you KNOW it's Thanksgiving.)

 

 post-73474-0-38502200-1448830765_thumb.jpg

 

This was a Thanksgiving "taco" I did with smoked confit turkey thigh, sweet potato, turkey skin cracklins, radishes, bbq sauce, and pickled onions. The onions were pickled in the cranberry consomme and they look and taste awesome. The sauce is that BBQ sauce I mentioned. I don't really remember what went in apart from spent cranberries, molasses, and paprika... but it took a lot of doctoring and experimentation to get it right.

 

post-73474-0-47074800-1448830237_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

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I also do a slaw-like thing based on shredded brussels sprouts. The easiest way to get going with that is to buy pre-shredded ones from Trader Joe's (or wherever) and pick through the bag to remove the larger chunks. Then cut everything else up into matchsticks (a task made easier with a mandoline). This was sprouts, granny smith apple, and watermelon radish, tossed with shaved parm and a pomegranate garnish. The dressing was TJ's dijon mustard, raw honey, apple cider vinegar, and a tablespoon or two of mayo.

 

59f349d566ef5_FullSizeRender(41).thumb.jpg.967f5eb7a3f45f56d65a5d677897b402.jpg

 

The only issue is that you have to toss it a la minute, or it'll sog-out on you. But when it's fresh, it's crunchy and bright and delicious.


Edited by btbyrd (log)
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Depends on how traditional, alt-traditional, or non-traditional you'd like to be. We're starting with pretty much the same as you: local fresh turkey (but slow-cooked vs. sous vide) and cornbread dressing (w/o the peppers). There's be a Oaxacan black mole (not this one, but similar) instead of gravy, which might work well for you, given the cornbread. We'll also make something similar to this stir-fried sweet potato recipe. Add a simple green veg -- maybe stir-fried green beans, so you can cook it at the same time as the sweet potatoes -- and you're good to go. Ms. Alex insists on a classic cooked and chilled whole-berry cranberry sauce (I use fresh OJ as the liquid), but any variation thereof would be fine -- even a cranberry sorbet as an intermezzo.

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Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

-The mosque is too far from home, so let's do this / Let's make a weeping child laugh.

    Nida Fazli, poet, 1938-2016 (translated, from the Urdu, by Anu Garg, wordsmith.org)

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@btbyrd Insanely great looking food!

1 hour ago, cakewalk said:

I love red cabbage. How do you make yours? 

 

Braised in apple juice with a little onion, and a hint of allspice & S/P

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For the first time in years I'm not cooking Thanksgiving dinner for the family.  Instead I will be going to a potluck/fundraiser.  It should be fun, but that means that the side dish I am bringing has to be on point.  I'm going to be watching this thread for some inspiration, but right now I'm leaning towards a gluten free sausage and herb dressing.  Dressing/stuffing is one of my favorite Thanksgiving foods.  I'm wondering if I can adapt my traditional recipe with wheat bread to corn bread?  Might have to do a trial run!  

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8 hours ago, cakewalk said:

I love red cabbage. How do you make yours? 

I don't have a specific recipe--it's different every time. Constants are shredded red cabbage, slivered red onion, a little garlic, a generous amount of red wine, cooked slowly for as long as it takes to get soft and jammy. I've added grated nutmeg, vanilla, dried cherries or cranberries, orange juice, a pinch of cinnamon, a little honey if it seems too tart--not all at the same time, of course.  My German grandmother was famous for her sweet and sour red cabbage, so sometimes as an homage I've stirred in a little vinegar and brown sugar. But I much prefer it on the savory side. Salt and pepper, of course.

 

I like the idea of apple juice too--gives it a nice fruit overtone. Allspice--hmm--gotta try that this TG.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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Not a side but for me I always have to have a mince pie!

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Do a search for Lenora's Yeast Rolls. (from Bernard Clayton's New Complete Book of Breads)

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I need to keep an eye on this topic. The last few years we've gone out, but this year we're feeling brave enough to tackle a turkey or similar, so we're going to see if we can make it happen at home. That lets us stay with our newest addition (Vinny the puppy) also, who we are very thankful for.

 

Does anyone do something other than turkey? Or in addition? I'm all for turkey because tradition, but other members of my household don't care for it terribly much. So I'm pondering perhaps a small turkey and something else also as a main course? We can't do shellfish because I'm allergic, though I suppose that might be somewhat traditional? Any other thoughts? I'd prefer something that will play well with the same sides as the turkey so we don't have too much in the way of clashing flavors going on.

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This isn't my year to make Thanksgiving dinner but I started making a list of things to think about for when I do.  It's just a list of suggestions and I'll look up recipes when I narrow it down, but here is what I have as possibilities.  Whenever I see or think of something else, I'll add it. I have another year before it's my turn again. When I did it last, along with the turkey, I also served a Heritage Ham (Duroc) which was a big hit.

 

Turkey

Ham

Rib Roast

 

Challah Bread

Georgia Biscuits

 

Sides

Dressing - Cornbread & andouille stuffing 

Cranberry chutney

 

Layered salad

3 bean salad

 

Creamed Corn 

Yukon Gold mashed potatoes

Broccoli & Cheese Casserole

Roasted Glazed Carrots

Country Baked  Apples

Sweet Potato Casserole

Baked Mac & Cheese

Potatoes & Ham Au Gratin

Green Beans

 

Desserts:Pies

 

Strawberry

Peach

Peach Praline

Cherry

Apple walnut

Pineapple upside down pie 

Pumpkin

Strawberry Rhubarb

Southern Pecan

Blackberry

Blueberry

 

Cakes

 

Carrot

Lemon


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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This green bean mushroom tart with blue cheese and crispy shallots is excellent.  I always make this when I make a mini Thanksgiving dinner for just the two of us (I don't get to have the exact things that I like when we go to the in-law's ...which is fine because I don't want to host so that means I don't get to choose the menu lol).

 

Anyway, it's easy and it tastes great at room temperature.

 

 

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56 minutes ago, Shelby said:

This green bean mushroom tart with blue cheese and crispy shallots is excellent.  I always make this when I make a mini Thanksgiving dinner for just the two of us (I don't get to have the exact things that I like when we go to the in-law's ...which is fine because I don't want to host so that means I don't get to choose the menu lol).

 

Anyway, it's easy and it tastes great at room temperature.

 

 

 

That looks very good, Shelby. I think it'll make an appearance at our Thanksgiving table, if not sooner.  Thanks for the link!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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10 hours ago, quiet1 said:

I need to keep an eye on this topic. The last few years we've gone out, but this year we're feeling brave enough to tackle a turkey or similar, so we're going to see if we can make it happen at home. That lets us stay with our newest addition (Vinny the puppy) also, who we are very thankful for.

 

Does anyone do something other than turkey? Or in addition? I'm all for turkey because tradition, but other members of my household don't care for it terribly much. So I'm pondering perhaps a small turkey and something else also as a main course? We can't do shellfish because I'm allergic, though I suppose that might be somewhat traditional? Any other thoughts? I'd prefer something that will play well with the same sides as the turkey so we don't have too much in the way of clashing flavors going on.

@quiet1  we don't care for Turkey either so we always have capon.  The breast doesn't seem to dry out the way Turkey does.  They range in size between 6 to 8 pounds and are delicious.  Unstuffed, they cook in about an hour.  They have a small frame and so there is lots of meat on them.  If that is to small for your group, Norm's suggestion of a ham would be good too.

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I really like this recipe for Nikki's Sweet Potatoes from 101 Cookbooks that includes coconut milk and fresh ginger with a topping of unsweetened coconut and macadamia nuts (I've also used hazelnuts).  There's just a spoonful of maple syrup so it's not cloyingly sweet but the marshmallow faction is appeased by the crunchy topping.  It's been a hit whenever I've made it for Thanksgiving.  Even my picky eater cousins, whose full list of acceptable vegetables consists entirely of corn, demolished a huge pan of it!


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

This green bean mushroom tart with blue cheese and crispy shallots is excellent.  I always make this when I make a mini Thanksgiving dinner for just the two of us (I don't get to have the exact things that I like when we go to the in-law's ...which is fine because I don't want to host so that means I don't get to choose the menu lol).

 

Anyway, it's easy and it tastes great at room temperature.

 

 

 

Would this work as an appetizer?  This building is having a holiday get-together and I need to bring an appetizer.  Our building has a large number of Jewish people who will be attending.  Does this dish meet their dietary requirements?  I'd like to bring something everyone can eat.

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4 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Would this work as an appetizer?  This building is having a holiday get-together and I need to bring an appetizer.  Our building has a large number of Jewish people who will be attending.  Does this dish meet their dietary requirements?  I'd like to bring something everyone can eat.

It would be wonderful as an appetizer IMO.  You could cut it into squares and people could put it in their hand on a napkin.  I can't think of a reason why it wouldn't meet their requirements.

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1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

 

Would this work as an appetizer?  This building is having a holiday get-together and I need to bring an appetizer.  Our building has a large number of Jewish people who will be attending.  Does this dish meet their dietary requirements?  I'd like to bring something everyone can eat.

I bookmarked that recipe because I think it looks great (thanks @Shelby), but I won't use it for TG because it has dairy in it, and since I keep kosher and we're having a bird, it's a no go. (No meat and dairy together.) There's no monolithic standard to keeping kosher (although not mixing meat and dairy is pretty much a standard; do I contradict myself? Very well then ...), and some Jews don't do it at all. So I don't see any reason not to bring it. If there are people in your building who keep kosher, they probably won't eat the turkey (unless it's a kosher turkey), and so might like having the tart. If there are people who are very religious, they probably won't eat much of anything, so no worries there! I think it would make a great appetizer. 

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@Shelby and @lindag  thank you.  @lindag there won't be any turkey served, just assorted appetizers.  So, i'll give this a go.  Trial run first, of course!

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Two things that go on our Thanksgiving table, no matter what. Cloud of Squash and Sweet and Sour Red Cabbage. The red cabbage recipe I use is below. Cloud of Squash is just a massive bowl of whipped baked butternut squash, with enough butter and salt to kill a vulnerable person.

 

Sweet and Sour Red Cabbage and Apples

2 tbsp. veg or olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped
1 small head red cabbage, quartered and thinly sliced
2 apples, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup red wine (any kind - even leftover yucky stuff is ok)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp. sugar (or more, to taste)
2 tsp.  salt
1/2 cup apple jelly (or any tart jelly - crabapple, grape...whatever)

In a large pot or Dutch oven, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onions, and cook, stirring for 5 minutes, until softened. Add the cabbage and cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, for 10 to 15 minutes or until the cabbage is thoroughly wilted and softened. Now add the apples, wine, vinegar, sugar, and salt, lower the heat to low, and simmer, covered, for 1-1/2 to 2 hours, stirring once in a while.

Stir in the apple jelly, replace the cover on the pot, and continue to simmer for another 15 to 20 minutes.

Makes about 8 servings.


Edited by Nyleve Baar (log)
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