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Pan

Great hard-to-find condiments

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On the sugar topic--and I realize that maybe you aren't into selling sugar products, but I thought I'd add this in case you change your mind.

 

La Canne sugar

 

I have the pecan and the ginger.  It's interesting and good.  I've put it on blueberry muffins before baking....cookies......

 

IMG_4059.JPG.4ecaa78f17d264c547747f2c4455c020.JPG

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We could always increase our scope some time later.

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Delivery to Australia would be wonderful, albeit at a higher premium, surely.

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Definitely. Shipping will cost more.

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Hi, everyone!

 

I went to the 6th Annual NYC Hot Sauce Expo in Greenpoint, Brooklyn today with my girlfriend. It was a way different experience from the Fancy Food Show I had attended in San Francisco in January. The Fancy Food Show is an industry event to which the general public are pretty much excluded and people are looking to do a lot of wholesale business. The Hot Sauce Expo, which will continue in my absence tomorrow (technically later today, Sunday), is a public event that requires only $12 and change for tickets (and I believe $10 if paid in cash at the venue). It's also specifically devoted to hot sauce (some alcoholic drinks, milk and bottled water are also available, as are barbecue, hot dogs and a couple of other food items, but they are sidelines), and loud though not ear-splitting heavy metal music plays from the "Stage of Doom" for most of the day.

 

More importantly, for my purposes, there was one absolutely phenomenal vendor, at least one other terrific one and several very good ones, among the larger number of ordinary ones and a few downright bad ones (if you're going on the last day, please trust me and do not try the crab salsa!). The mix of vendors was quite interesting, with a good representation from New York and nearby states from Massachusetts to New Jersey, others from the South (one great one is from Florida and was in the far side of the room) and West and some international ones from Australia (who had a good gingery sauce) and England. My girlfriend also enjoyed the expo as a retail customer who tried most of the same sauces I tried and a few others and bought 3 sauces.

I'm still writing up my notes about the vendors, but definitely plan to use some products from some of the best ones who exhibited today.

 

At the end of the show, both of us had some beer from Lagunitas, one of the exhibitors, and a blessedly non-spicy Polish meal at a food store with tables called Polka Dot (my girlfriend also bought several items to go for her 2nd-generation Polish-American mother) and then walked down to Williamsburg to have some good hot chocolate and chamomile tea at Martha's Country Bakery. I plan to lay off the spice tomorrow, too, but it was certainly a good afternoon and a very worthwhile trip to the expo.

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7 hours ago, Pan said:

Hi, everyone!

 

I went to the 6th Annual NYC Hot Sauce Expo in Greenpoint, Brooklyn today with my girlfriend. It was a way different experience from the Fancy Food Show I had attended in San Francisco in January. The Fancy Food Show is an industry event to which the general public are pretty much excluded and people are looking to do a lot of wholesale business. The Hot Sauce Expo, which will continue in my absence tomorrow (technically later today, Sunday), is a public event that requires only $12 and change for tickets (and I believe $10 if paid in cash at the venue). It's also specifically devoted to hot sauce (some alcoholic drinks, milk and bottled water are also available, as are barbecue, hot dogs and a couple of other food items, but they are sidelines), and loud though not ear-splitting heavy metal music plays from the "Stage of Doom" for most of the day.

 

More importantly, for my purposes, there was one absolutely phenomenal vendor, at least one other terrific one and several very good ones, among the larger number of ordinary ones and a few downright bad ones (if you're going on the last day, please trust me and do not try the crab salsa!). The mix of vendors was quite interesting, with a good representation from New York and nearby states from Massachusetts to New Jersey, others from the South (one great one is from Florida and was in the far side of the room) and West and some international ones from Australia (who had a good gingery sauce) and England. My girlfriend also enjoyed the expo as a retail customer who tried most of the same sauces I tried and a few others and bought 3 sauces.

I'm still writing up my notes about the vendors, but definitely plan to use some products from some of the best ones who exhibited today.

 

At the end of the show, both of us had some beer from Lagunitas, one of the exhibitors, and a blessedly non-spicy Polish meal at a food store with tables called Polka Dot (my girlfriend also bought several items to go for her 2nd-generation Polish-American mother) and then walked down to Williamsburg to have some good hot chocolate and chamomile tea at Martha's Country Bakery. I plan to lay off the spice tomorrow, too, but it was certainly a good afternoon and a very worthwhile trip to the expo.

 

I am anxious for you to get this venture up and going. I feel pretty certain I will be a good customer.

 

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This is my go to condiment.  Straight from the squeeze bottle onto fajitas, sandwiches or into a stew pot.  Also mixed with mayo, or mixed with cherry preserves next to grilled fish and meats.   My husband likes the dulce version better for straight from the bottle uses.  

 

Image result for chipotle squeeze jacquesImage result for clemente jacques chipotle dulce

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Thanks, and it's great to have someone in this thread who lives part of the time in Mexico! I'll look into it.

 

kayb, we're eager to get this business started, too. We're still in the research and planning stage and will keep everyone abreast of our progress.

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There are some very interesting relishes, jams and sauces made here in Australia from native ingredients (we call it bush tucker).  lemon myrtle, finger lime, quandong and samphire spring to mind, and are quite prevalent in better restaurants, although often expensive 

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Cronker, do you have any favorite makers for these items? I'd be quite interested.

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I did some quick checking on Clemente Jacques. Clemente Jacques seems to be a pretty widely available brand, though the Chipotles Dulces are not for sale on either Walmart or Amazon, so the variety of products that are easy to obtain throughout the U.S. seems to be limited.

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18 hours ago, gulfporter said:

This is my go to condiment.  Straight from the squeeze bottle onto fajitas, sandwiches or into a stew pot.  Also mixed with mayo, or mixed with cherry preserves next to grilled fish and meats.   My husband likes the dulce version better for straight from the bottle uses.  

 

Image result for chipotle squeeze jacquesImage result for clemente jacques chipotle dulce

I'm now totally intrigued by these. Any guesses where I'd find them in the USA, at least until @Pan gets his venture up and running? I'm in small-town upstate New York, a 6-hour drive from NYC but within easy reach of online sources.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks, Cronker. Those products look very interesting. Do you have favorites from among them?


Edited by Pan (log)

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Melissa, some products from that company are available on Amazon, but not all of them.

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The bush tomato sauce and the lemon Myrtle chilli are both really good and give very interesting variations on flavours you are familiar with.

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I will definitely keep these in mind. Thanks, Cronker.

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No problem.  Keep in mind that the brand I have suggested is one of the larger producers- a great amount of Bush tucker is very artisanal and small scale.  You might be better off having a purveyor if you’re after the really good and interesting things..

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Here's one I just ran across:

 

jam.thumb.jpg.19d534434ff261bd3693a63bf0de7498.jpg

 

Website here.

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