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Pan

Great hard-to-find condiments

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Thanks a lot for the additional information and ideas. You folks really know some interesting stuff.

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On 10/27/2017 at 6:04 PM, andiesenji said:

I have ordered some things from Australia that were not readily available here.  Wattleseed is one. I have purchased it a couple of times and experimented with several recipes.

 

andiesenji, which company have you ordered wattleseed from? Can you compare the taste to anything else you've tried?

 

I hope I can find a jam like the one you described.

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On 11/7/2017 at 5:23 AM, Anna N said:

I was just given some passion berries from Ethiopia and some Timur pepper from Kathmandu.  Fabulous. 

Anna, could you describe these a little? I don't think I've had passion berries before. Do you find this description accurate?

 

Quote

A native of the central desert regions and another of Australia's many and varied wild tomatoes, Passion Berries are a real sweet surprise.[...]The amazingly sweet and aromatic fruit are generally 1-1.5cm in diameter and hang in great numbers right at soil level under the plant. The fruit are ripe when creamy yellow, and taste somewhere between banana, caramel and vanilla.

 

Are the ones you have dried? What do you use them for?

 

Also, how is Timur pepper different from other varieties?

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7 minutes ago, Pan said:

Anna, could you describe these a little? I don't think I've had passion berries before. Do you find this description accurate?

 

 

Are the ones you have dried? What do you use them for?

 

Also, how is Timur pepper different from other varieties?

 No that is not a description of the Ethiopian variety. See here.   I have not yet had much of a chance to play around with them and my ability to describe tasting notes is zero. 

 

 I find the Timur  pepper to be much more fragrant and floral than the pepper I usually use which is Tellicherry.  I don’t use it in cooking because I think its unique properties disappear too quickly. So I finish my dishes with it rather than use it in creating them.  I am betting @andiesenji will be much more helpful with your questions than I.  She is a connoisseur while I’m just a consumer and grateful receiver of such gifts. 

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Anna, thanks for the quick response and for helping me avoid going in the wrong direction. Of course there are passion fruits, too, which I'm quite familiar with (they are wonderful in Hawaii!), but I knew you didn't mean those.

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1 hour ago, Pan said:

Anna, thanks for the quick response and for helping me avoid going in the wrong direction. Of course there are passion fruits, too, which I'm quite familiar with (they are wonderful in Hawaii!), but I knew you didn't mean those.

 Can you believe I have never had a passion fruit?  Live a sheltered life. Anyway I hope you get some help In starting your business. It sounds like it could be a lot of fun for you and for those of us who enjoy exploring new things.In starting your business.

 

 Edited to remove dictation echo!  


Edited by Anna N Remove dictation error that repeats last sentence (log)

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6 hours ago, Pan said:

 

andiesenji, which company have you ordered wattleseed from? Can you compare the taste to anything else you've tried?

 

I hope I can find a jam like the one you described.

Here is the link to my post in 2011 about using the wattleseed and the vendor and some other things I ordered.

 

Further down the page is a mention of black garlic, which is now much easier to find than it was then.  

 

If you do a search for wattleseed, you will find a page full of posts from various members.  I read all of them eagerly when I first began using it.  It has a flavor that is like a combination of coffee, chocolate, roasted hazelnuts and even a hint of pepper.   I don't think there is anyway to get the exact flavor by combining these things.

I have used it in cookies, including a shortbread that I took to a holiday party and was totally consumed, including the crumbs.  

 

 

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On 11/21/2017 at 2:55 AM, andiesenji said:

Here is the link to my post in 2011 about using the wattleseed and the vendor and some other things I ordered.

 

Further down the page is a mention of black garlic, which is now much easier to find than it was then.  

 

If you do a search for wattleseed, you will find a page full of posts from various members.  I read all of them eagerly when I first began using it.  It has a flavor that is like a combination of coffee, chocolate, roasted hazelnuts and even a hint of pepper.   I don't think there is anyway to get the exact flavor by combining these things.

I have used it in cookies, including a shortbread that I took to a holiday party and was totally consumed, including the crumbs.  

 

 

 

The pepperberry shown on  Vic Cherikoff's page looks like Mountain Pepper, Tasmannia lanceolata to me. I don't find it particularly peppery. 

 

We call the fruit of Schinus molle, Pepper Tree, pepperberry or pink peppercorn. This is an invasive species introduced from South America, so I'm sure you can find some closer. I've never harvested any from the tree in my back yard. There is some question about whether it is safe for children to consume.

 

Not all wattle seed is considered edible and some apparently has other ingestion properties. I do wish suppliers would let you know what species they are using. The list of edible seeds may be incomplete - an indigenous park ranger mentioned a species to me that I hadn't seen elsewhere.

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Anna, all of you are helping me make preparations to start this business, and I will certainly continue to post while I continue to do research and get this off the ground.

 

andiesenji, thanks a lot for the link. Australian $145/kg isn't cheap, but how long would it take you to use up that amount? I see they're currently out of stock in that, but they do have the extract: https://cherikoff.net/shop/product/wattleseed-extract-1kg/. Would you use that, or do you prefer the powder?

 

haresfur, I don't think I would want to sell a product that might be dangerous for children. But in terms of wattle seed, would you trust the safety of the product Vic Cherikoff is selling? https://cherikoff.net/shop/product/wattleseed-1kg/

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13 hours ago, Pan said:

haresfur, I don't think I would want to sell a product that might be dangerous for children. But in terms of wattle seed, would you trust the safety of the product Vic Cherikoff is selling? https://cherikoff.net/shop/product/wattleseed-1kg/

 

I think you may want to decide if you want to sell under the currently available brands, in their packaging, or if you want to repackage for sale. I don't know the regulations vis a vis being a producer rather than a more passive importer. In any case it pays to shop around: a quick look on the internet came up with a low price of $88/1000g. The only supplier I am familiar with is Herbie's, because that's what they sell at my local store. They seem to only deal in small packs. I'm intrigued by Outback Pride because they appear to be doing good things with the aboriginal communities and are producers, not just marketers. I have bought their sauces from the supermarket so I know they have a viable business. And a social-good story is a selling point. Maybe contact them about pricing to your market. Don't forget the Aussie dollar is pretty low these days. 

 

It appears that DMT is found in the bark and leaves so you should be right with seeds sold by any of the bush tucker suppliers.

 

Good luck!

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Thanks a lot, haresfur.

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This mustard is great on bagels with cream cheese , tomato, and onion. Great little business in Trinidad CA. Wish I could find it locally. 

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Thanks for the suggestions, anomalii and Jo; I'll see what I can do. Jo, what's special about that red wine vinegar in particular?


Edited by Pan (log)

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8 hours ago, Pan said:

Thanks for the suggestions, anomalii and Jo; I'll see what I can do. Jo, what's special about that red wine vinegar in particular?

 

 

Orleans method.  Since I posted I found a source for Martin Pouret but I haven't ordered yet.  I have about 2/3 bottle left!

 

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Are you planning to ship to Canada?  (She asked, hopefully.)

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Yes, I plan to ship to Canada, too.

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12 hours ago, Pan said:

Yes, I plan to ship to Canada, too.

 

Yes!  Wonderful!

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Thanks a lot, Jo! Is it not possible to purchase the vinegar directly from the producer? http://www.martin-pouret.com/en/contact

 

Maybe that requires an importation license, something we would obviously need if we intend to do wholesale trade from foreign countries.

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Another thought, per the discussion in Modernist Bread how about European fine rye flour?  ...assuming flour can be called a condiment.

 

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It can't be considered a condiment, but do you have a favorite producer?

 

I do speak French pretty well in practice and can write in French. Thanks for the link, which I'll have a look at.

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9 hours ago, Pan said:

It can't be considered a condiment, but do you have a favorite producer?

 

I do speak French pretty well in practice and can write in French. Thanks for the link, which I'll have a look at.

 

To the best of my remembrance I have never purchased rye flour in my life.  From the Modernist Bread discussion apparently suitably fine rye flour is not sold in the US.

 

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