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louwings

Hey there!

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louwings   

I'm a new member of this forum. Excited to learn more recipes and cooking skills from you guys!

And also to share some of my insights :D

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Hi @louwings,

 

Welcome to the eGullet forums. This is the best food forum to learn about cuisines and food cultures of the world and share your knowledge. We have members from all over the world, and you will learn something new every day here.

 

Please tell us about the foods you like to cook and eat. Do you cook at home or eat out in restaurants a lot? Where in the world are you, and what kind of ingredients are available to you? It's always interesting to learn what other members have at their disposal for raw materials in recipes.

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louwings   

Hi Thanks for the Crepes and Kim Shook! :)

I'm in Australia, specifically, Sydney. I'm a newbie when it comes to cooking and my recent works are easy recipes. I joined the forum to learn more from you guys in terms of tips, skills, and recipes. Anyway, the latest one I've cooked was called a Cajun Salmon with Chargrilled Corn Salsa. I got the recipe from my energy provider. I think it was pretty good. Here's the recipe if you want to try http://www.covau.com.au/blog/cajun-salmon-with-chargrilled-corn-salsa

 

How about you guys? Tell me about the food you cook!

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Hey @louwings,

 

I cooked up a mess of fried medium shrimp and french fries tonight. The shrimp were just lightly dusted with flour and tail on and the fries were thin cut. I made homemade tartar sauce to go with and preceded it with a salad with lemon vinaigrette dressing. I also tend to cook a lot of Mexican or Tex-Mex food because I just like it a lot. I also like Indian although I am learning in this area, but it certainly appeals enough to me to keep pursuing it. I am late to the party on this cuisine, having only been introduced to it when Indian immigrants started opening restaurants around here. It's astounding what their ancient culture does with vegetables.

 

We have at least one member and I think actually three that are currently active from Sydney Australia. Isn't that where there is this absolutely amazing seafood market unrivaled in the world except maybe for Japan?

 

Where does your salmon come from? Our best available get shipped in from Alaska or our Pacific Northwest and is wild. People are trying to farm it, but it doesn't taste as good, doesn't seem to provide as good nutrition as the wild caught fish, and there are reports that diseases concentrated in the farming conditions can harm the wild population. I love a nice thick salmon steak cut crosswise across the spine of the fish bone-in and skin-on done over charcoal. This is so good. I have a food memory from steaks just like this done over charcoal one Easter that I will remember forever. So many places like to take the bones out. I hate that. They practically fall out when cooked, keep the flesh from drying out and I love the tasty gelatinous stuff surrounding them that I enjoy while eating the salmon steak.

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Welcome, so glad you joined us. I hope that you find lots of recipes and the help that you need to become an experienced cook. You're going to find that cooking by Metric measurements and by cooking by volume measurements, as we do is a bit confusing. If there's anything that we can do to help, please don't hesitate to ask. In fact, maybe our Australian friends and we can start a new topic so that you can help us with our metric and we can help you interpret some of our recipes. And you can explain to us some of those quaint expressions you have and we can explain some of our more confusing idioms. Although we, supposedly, speak the same language we have a lot to learn from each other.

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