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The Sweet Makers on BBC

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I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 


Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 


BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 

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