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Which country's tea do you like best?


Hezo541
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3 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

No tea shops in this county or nearby as far as I can tell. :S

 

ETA: This place isn't far—Corning, NY

 

 

Most places do sampling, ask to try whatever they will offer.

 

I get a lot of tea from Asian markets. Many basic types are under $5. Sure, there are better, pricier types. But, everyone starts somewhere. A pound box of gen mai cha can cost as little as $3, and you'll have tea to drink for months.

 

For me, the most important thing is that it is loose tea, not teabags. I can taste the flavor of the bag. Also, some companies put inferior sweepings/dust in the bags. You will get more tea and better tea at an overall lower cost by purchasing loose tea.

 

Of course, for loose tea, an infuser is useful. I prefer the type with a handle over the kind on a chain. The kind on a chain are difficult to open and clean sometimes. The micro-fine type that rest on the cup are also good, but cost more.

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3 minutes ago, Lisa Shock said:

I get a lot of tea from Asian markets.

 

I've been told that there are a couple small asian markets in Ithaca, NY—about 33 miles away.

I've been wanting to check them out sometime—when I'm in the mood to leave the property.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

There are hundreds, if not thousands of Chinese teas. Which ones?

I had a fantastic Chinese Long Island Ice Tea last time I visited Shanghai ...

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On 26/08/2017 at 0:51 AM, KennethT said:

I used to drink a lot of Lung Ching (Dragon's well green tea) - although, when I had it in Beijing they called it Long Jian. 

 

In Mandarin Chinese (by far the largest dialect), it is 龙井 lóng jǐng, which means Dragon's Well, so that's what you heard in Beijing, although the Beijing accent may sound like 'jian'.

 

Similarly, in Mandarin, Ti Kwan Yin  is '铁观音 tiě guān yīn '.

 

As far as I can make out the transliterations you are using are Cantonese based. But I speak very little Cantonese.

 

The one I can never work out is how 'oolong' arose. In both Mandarin and Cantonese, it is preceded by a /w/ sound.  Mandarin: 乌龙 wū lóng; Cantonese: 烏龍 wu1 lung4*2. Bizarre group of languages!

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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@liuzhou I'm sure the transliterations I am using are Cantonese based - as the Cantonese (lots from HK) were the first to come to NY over a hundred years ago.  Only relatively recently (last 10-15 years?) have there been more and more restaurants and shops owned by people who spoke Mandarin or something other than Cantonese.  I gather there's been a large influx of Fujianese in the last several years.

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9 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@liuzhou I'm sure the transliterations I am using are Cantonese based - as the Cantonese (lots from HK) were the first to come to NY over a hundred years ago.  Only relatively recently (last 10-15 years?) have there been more and more restaurants and shops owned by people who spoke Mandarin or something other than Cantonese.  I gather there's been a large influx of Fujianese in the last several years.

 

I know. The same in England. But changing rapidly. Fujian people came centuries ago. The English word "tea" is from a Fujian dialect.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Canada's - as I grow my own!

 

Lately I have been enjoying a concoction of Lemon Grass, Mint, Ginger (non local) and Cilantro.  Really tasty.

 

This morning, it's Chaga, Lemon Grass and Mint. 

 

Far more benefits than traditional tea, no caffeine, and (in my opinion at least) far tastier.

 

Though I do enjoy a nice Chinese White (White peony) or (red) Oolong every now and then.

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On 8/25/2017 at 0:43 AM, liuzhou said:

 

I find it interesting that Chinese people almost never drink tea with food. Before or after, yes. but during the meal, no.

 

This is not to suggest that you are in any way "wrong" to do so. I just thought it might be an interesting observation to throw into the conversation.

 

 

I understand that dim sum is always with tea for the Chinese. As a matter of fact they don't even say "let's do dim sum", they say "let's go have tea".

 

dcarch

 

 

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2 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

I understand that dim sum is always with tea for the Chinese. As a matter of fact they don't even say "let's do dim sum", they say "let's go have tea".

 

dcarch

 

 

 

Yes, you are correct. Dim sum is small snacks to accompany tea and the event is called 'yam cha'. It is usually translated as 'morning tea' although the literal meaning is 'drink tea'.

 

It is a Cantonese/Hong Kong breakfast tradition.

 

I should have said that most do not drink tea with full meals such as lunch or dinner. I forgot about yam cha, because I can't bear it. The food and tea are ok, but the noise is cacophonous.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Who said M&S Gold tea, it is my choice as well, drunk black with no sugar.

Now here is the thing, new advice is to brew the loose tea for 3 minutes stir with a spoon then let it rest for two more minutes, in this way you will not be drinking boiling hot tea and will appreciate it's  subtleties.

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