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Hello! I was wondering if anyone on here has tried using an induction cooktop with confection making (caramels, fondant, marshmallows ect...). My stove has literally three settings, and the low setting still burns sugar and there is no such thing as maintaining any sort of "simmer". I was looking into getting a cooktop and buying some copper sugar pots and mauviel makes this thing that goes inbetween. I would love to hear any input into this idea or your experiences!

 

~Sarah

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I would suggest that if you are using induction for sugar, that you use induction ready pots rather than putting the disc in between. Induction is great for confections, but the discs aren't - it really removes the advantage of induction over other types of cook tops.

 

 

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Thankyou Kerry for this insight :) I will try first with a pan that is designed for induction cooking. I really hope it works!

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