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chef koo

Cleaning leeks

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I've seen a number of recipes involving whole, uncut leeks. Is the idea to clean them whole (Is that possible?); buy them dirtless (is that also possible?), or is it no possible and you simply accept the dirt and just eat it?


Edited by chef koo (log)

bork bork bork

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To get long white leek stems, farmers pile dirt up high to blanch. Therefore you will always have plenty of dirt.

 

There are dirtless leeks grown hydroponically.

 

dcarch

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

 

I am fairly sure the leeks here in China are not grown hydroponically, yet they are dirtless.

Correct me if I am wrong but I seem to think that Chinese (as it were) leeks are very different from "Welsh" leeks.  At least the ones I have seen in the Asian stores here.  They are much more delicate and petite compared to the giant ones we get in the regular grocery store. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Just now, Anna N said:

Correct me if I am wrong but I seem to think that Chinese (as it were) leeks are very different from "Welsh" leeks.  At least the ones I have seen in the Asian stores here.  They are much more delicate and petite compared to the giant ones we get in the regular grocery store. 

 

You are correct, but we get both types. My comments above refer to the 'Welsh' type.

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In recent years all the leeks I've bought have been 'dirtless'.

It used to be that you'd have to slice in half from top to bottom and rinse under running water between the layers to dislodge the dirt.  One of Ina Garten's methods is to slice the leeks in half inch rounds and soak in a bowl of cold water, then drain to get rid of the sand.

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35 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

You are correct, but we get both types. My comments above refer to the 'Welsh' type.

Very interesting. There is no way you could eat the leeks I buy without thoroughly washing them.  We are not talking a little sand here and there but small clumps of dirt that insinuate themselves between the layers. I have never found reason to serve leeks "whole"  so it doesn't bother me a great deal.  I either cut them up crosswise and  swish them around in a couple of changes of water or make two slits lengthwise ( and shuffle the layers like a deck of cards) so that I can get out the dirt. Now if you were going to use only the very white part above the root then you might well get away without cleaning them.  But they are darned

 expensive here so one tries to use as much as is reasonable.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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2 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Very interesting. There is no way you could eat the leeks I buy without thoroughly washing them.  We are not talking a little sand here and there but small clumps of dirt that insinuate themselves between the layers.

 

Yes, that is how I remember them in England.

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I have yet to see a leek I'd be happy to eat without a thorough cleaning.


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I had to buy a couple of leeks to use with dinner later today.

They hardly even resemble the leeks I buy here. That clear demarcation between the white and green is not present on my leeks and mine are nowhere near as slender and delicate.  You would not even have to look inside to find dirt on the leeks here!  Lucky you!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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3 hours ago, Anna N said:

They hardly even resemble the leeks I buy here. That clear demarcation between the white and green is not present on my leeks and mine are nowhere near as slender and delicate.  ------------------!

 

This?  :D

 

leek_1.jpg'

(Googled Image)

 

dcarch

 

 

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

This?  :D

 Not quite. Very close. Mine are much dirtier. :D

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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