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Fish Cake Herb


blbst36
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Hi All - another simple question on a recipe.  They are fish and potato cakes.  I'm using cod and russet potatoes to make the cake, but I'm stumped on replacing the tarragon in them.  When I made them before, I wasn't a fan of it.  I hate rosemary, so that's not an option.  Would basil be an acceptable replacement?  

 

Thanks!

 

ETA - I forgot to mention it calls for fresh herbs :$

Edited by blbst36 (log)
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FWIW, in my neck of the woods the herb of choice for such things is summer savory. It's not one of the more common herbs, but it's nice to have on hand...it has hints of thyme and sage, but with a pleasantly peppery bite. 

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41 minutes ago, chromedome said:

FWIW, in my neck of the woods the herb of choice for such things is summer savory. It's not one of the more common herbs, but it's nice to have on hand...it has hints of thyme and sage, but with a pleasantly peppery bite. 

 

I don't think I've seen anything like that.  Is that fresh?

 

31 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

How about thyme?

 

I love thyme.  Would that go well with fish?

 

Thanks!!

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The most common herb used in my neck of the woods is chopped parsley, salt and pepper. If you are using a good quality flavoured fish, you do not want to kill the flavour with using too strong a herb. Also, instead of just breading the fish cakes, use crushed cornflakes or crushed weetbix. I do not know if cod has any flavour - it is most likely like our hake - zltch flavour!

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9 minutes ago, blbst36 said:

I don't think I've seen anything like that.  Is that fresh?

 

It's usually sold in dried form, though you might find it fresh at a farmer's market. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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10 minutes ago, JohnT said:

The most common herb used in my neck of the woods is chopped parsley, salt and pepper. If you are using a good quality flavoured fish, you do not want to kill the flavour with using too strong a herb. Also, instead of just breading the fish cakes, use crushed cornflakes or crushed weetbix. I do not know if cod has any flavour - it is most likely like our hake - zltch flavour!

 

I think parsley would be too sweet, no?  Cod isn't a strong flavored fish.  It's one of the milder ones, but I wouldn't call it flavorless.  

 

This recipe actually uses fresh breadcrumbs for the breading.  I think it worked out pretty well......wish I could remember.

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No, parsley is quite a mild herb that pairs well with fish. I certainly would not term it sweet. And yes, fresh bread crumbs are fine and will crisp-up nicely if fried properly - I was just giving you a different angle at making fish cakes. But follow your recipe and they should work out just fine if it has worked for you in the past.

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Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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2 hours ago, JohnT said:

No, parsley is quite a mild herb that pairs well with fish. I certainly would not term it sweet. And yes, fresh bread crumbs are fine and will crisp-up nicely if fried properly - I was just giving you a different angle at making fish cakes. But follow your recipe and they should work out just fine if it has worked for you in the past.

Maybe I am thinking of  the dried parsley I have, but it actually does add sweetness to the dish you are making.  I can't use it with eggs because I don't like sweet with my eggs :) 

 

Ok - I thought maybe the suggestions you made were better than fresh bread crumbs!  I'm not a fan of cornflakes as a breading, honestly.  It comes down to the sweet again.  I'll eat a bowl of them like no one's business. but I tend to avoid recipes that use them as a coating.

 

2 hours ago, JohnT said:

Thanks!

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a very long time ago I lived near a fantastic fish monger on Long Island.

 

then P.F. came out with this book :

 

https://www.amazon.com/Seafood-Cookbook-Classic-Contemporary/dp/0812916042/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 

 

I used to make a bread crumb mix , butter , garlic dry white wine and

 

get ready 

 

fresh cilantro

 

an Rx from the book

 

I know some can't stand cilantro

 

OK with me

 

but I like it.

 

consider some fresh finely chopped  cilantro   

 

not too much

 

only if you like it.

 

butter ? just a little ?  dry white wine ? deduced ?  not too much ?

 

 

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8 hours ago, chromedome said:

FWIW, in my neck of the woods the herb of choice for such things is summer savory. It's not one of the more common herbs, but it's nice to have on hand...it has hints of thyme and sage, but with a pleasantly peppery bite. 

 

That's what I was going to suggest.

 

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The basil worked well.  The Parsley would've worked, too, if I had managed to chop it fine enough.  Regardless, I had problems with the damn things staying together.  I don't remember having this much trouble last time, but I'm sure I did.  I may tweak the recipe.  It doesn't have anything to actually bind all the ingredients together.  Just potatoes, fish, herbs, and a bit of heavy cream.

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17 hours ago, blbst36 said:

The basil worked well.  The Parsley would've worked, too, if I had managed to chop it fine enough.  Regardless, I had problems with the damn things staying together.  I don't remember having this much trouble last time, but I'm sure I did.  I may tweak the recipe.  It doesn't have anything to actually bind all the ingredients together.  Just potatoes, fish, herbs, and a bit of heavy cream.

 

Eggs or besan (chickpea flour), just a little, would bind it fine. You can get besan at Patel Brothers on your way home, along with a lot of other really, really interesting ingredients you can't find anywhere else. If you go, make sure you check out the 18 or so barrels filled with Indian snacks. I can't wait until I get up there again for the fragrant savory, spicy square crackers. Everything in the barrels is $4.99 a pound. The produce department is also a wonder for anyone who enjoys new food discoveries.

 

Some vegan chefs even make a meringue style dessert topping from the liquid in canned chickpeas. They have surprising, egg-like binding properties. 

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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4 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Eggs or besan (chickpea flour), just a little, would bind it fine. You can get besan at Patel Brothers on your way home, along with a lot of other really, really interesting ingredients you can't find anywhere else. If you go, make sure you check out the 18 or so barrels filled with Indian snacks. I can't wait until I get up there again for the fragrant savory, spicy square crackers. Everything in the barrels is $4.99 a pound. The produce department is also a wonder for anyone who enjoys new food discoveries.

 

Some vegan chefs even make a meringue style dessert topping from the liquid in canned chickpeas. They have surprising, egg-like binding properties. 

 

Thanks!  I actually have besan flour already.  I know I've been to Patel's, but I don't know if I bought anything there.  I'll have to check it out again for the snacks.  I wasn't in the best mood when I went 9_9

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